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What the New Science of Psychedelics Teaches Us About consciousness, dying, addiction, depression, and transcendence

Michael Pollan

BISAC: BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY / Science & Technology. | MEDICAL / Mental Health.

Subjects: LCSH: Pollan, Michael, 1955—Mental health. | Hallucinogenic drugs—Therapeutic use. | Psychotherapy patients—Biography.

How to Change Your Mind- What the New Science of Psychedelics Teaches Us About Consciousness
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Book Details
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 4.00
 Pages
 456 p
 File Size 
 3,540 KB
 File Type
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 ISBN
 9780525558941 (ebook) 
 Copyright©   
 2018 by Michael Pollan

About the Author
MICHAEL POLLAN is the author of seven previous books, including
Cooked, Food Rules, In Defense of Food, The Omnivore’s Dilemma, and
The Botany of Desire, all of which were New York Times bestsellers. A
longtime contributor to The New York Times Magazine, he also teaches
writing at Harvard and the University of California, Berkeley, where he is
the John S. and James L. Knight Professor of Journalism. In 2010, Time
magazine named him in its list of the one hundred most influential
people in the world.
....

PROLOGUE
A New Door
MIDWAY THROUGH the twentieth century, two unusual new molecules,
organic compounds with a striking family resemblance, exploded upon
the West. In time, they would change the course of social, political, and
cultural history, as well as the personal histories of the millions of people
who would eventually introduce them to their brains. As it happened, the
arrival of these disruptive chemistries coincided with another world
historical explosion—that of the atomic bomb. There were people who
compared the two events and made much of the cosmic synchronicity.
Extraordinary new energies had been loosed upon the world; things
would never be quite the same.

The first of these molecules was an accidental invention of science.
Lysergic acid diethylamide, commonly known as LSD, was first
synthesized by Albert Hofmann in 1938, shortly before physicists split an
atom of uranium for the first time. Hofmann, who worked for the Swiss
pharmaceutical firm Sandoz, had been looking for a drug to stimulate
circulation, not a psychoactive compound. It wasn’t until five years later
when he accidentally ingested a minuscule quantity of the new chemical
that he realized he had created something powerful, at once terrifying and wondrous.

The second molecule had been around for thousands of years, though
no one in the developed world was aware of it. Produced not by a chemist
but by an inconspicuous little brown mushroom, this molecule, which
would come to be known as psilocybin, had been used by the indigenous
peoples of Mexico and Central America for hundreds of years as a
sacrament. Called teonanácatl by the Aztecs, or “flesh of the gods,” the
mushroom was brutally suppressed by the Roman Catholic Church after
the Spanish conquest and driven underground. In 1955, twelve years after
Albert Hofmann’s discovery of LSD, a Manhattan banker and amateur
mycologist named R. Gordon Wasson sampled the magic mushroom in
the town of Huautla de Jiménez in the southern Mexican state of Oaxaca.
Two years later, he published a fifteen-page account of the “mushrooms
that cause strange visions” in Life magazine, marking the moment when
news of a new form of consciousness first reached the general public. (In
1957, knowledge of LSD was mostly confined to the community of
researchers and mental health professionals.) People would not realize
the magnitude of what had happened for several more years, but history
in the West had shifted.

The impact of these two molecules is hard to overestimate. The advent
of LSD can be linked to the revolution in brain science that begins in the
1950s, when scientists discovered the role of neurotransmitters in the
brain. That quantities of LSD measured in micrograms could produce
symptoms resembling psychosis inspired brain scientists to search for the
neurochemical basis of mental disorders previously believed to be
psychological in origin. At the same time, psychedelics found their way
into psychotherapy, where they were used to treat a variety of disorders,
including alcoholism, anxiety, and depression. For most of the 1950s and
early 1960s, many in the psychiatric establishment regarded LSD and
psilocybin as miracle drugs.

The arrival of these two compounds is also linked to the rise of the
counterculture during the 1960s and, perhaps especially, to its particular
tone and style. For the first time in history, the young had a rite of
passage all their own: the “acid trip.” Instead of folding the young into the
adult world, as rites of passage have always done, this one landed them in
a country of the mind few adults had any idea even existed. The effect on
society was, to put it mildly, disruptive.

Yet by the end of the 1960s, the social and political shock waves
unleashed by these molecules seemed to dissipate. The dark side of
psychedelics began to receive tremendous amounts of publicity—bad
trips, psychotic breaks, flashbacks, suicides—and beginning in 1965 the
exuberance surrounding these new drugs gave way to moral panic. As
quickly as the culture and the scientific establishment had embraced
psychedelics, they now turned sharply against them. By the end of the
decade, psychedelic drugs—which had been legal in most places—were
outlawed and forced underground. At least one of the twentieth century’s
two bombs appeared to have been defused.
Then something unexpected and telling happened. Beginning in the
1990s, well out of view of most of us, a small group of scientists,
psychotherapists, and so-called psychonauts, believing that something
precious had been lost from both science and culture, resolved to recover it.

Today, after several decades of suppression and neglect, psychedelics
are having a renaissance. A new generation of scientists, many of them
inspired by their own personal experience of the compounds, are testing
their potential to heal mental illnesses such as depression, anxiety,
trauma, and addiction. Other scientists are using psychedelics in
conjunction with new brain-imaging tools to explore the links between
brain and mind, hoping to unravel some of the mysteries of consciousness.

One good way to understand a complex system is to disturb it and then
see what happens. By smashing atoms, a particle accelerator forces them
to yield their secrets. By administering psychedelics in carefully
calibrated doses, neuroscientists can profoundly disturb the normal
waking consciousness of volunteers, dissolving the structures of the self
and occasioning what can be described as a mystical experience. While
this is happening, imaging tools can observe the changes in the brain’s
activity and patterns of connection. Already this work is yielding
surprising insights into the “neural correlates” of the sense of self and
spiritual experience. The hoary 1960s platitude that psychedelics offered
a key to understanding—and “expanding”—consciousness no longer looks
quite so preposterous.

How to Change Your Mind is the story of this renaissance. Although it
didn’t start out that way, it is a very personal as well as public history.
Perhaps this was inevitable. Everything I was learning about the thirdperson
history of psychedelic research made me want to explore this
novel landscape of the mind in the first person too—to see how the
changes in consciousness these molecules wrought actually feel and what,
if anything, they had to teach me about my mind and might contribute to my life.


Table of Contents
Also by Michael Pollan
Title Page
Copyright
Dedication
Epigraph
Prologue: A New Door
CHAPTER ONE
A Renaissance
CHAPTER TWO
Natural History: Bemushroomed
Coda
CHAPTER THREE
History: The First Wave
Part I: The Promise
Part II: The Crack-Up
Coda
CHAPTER FOUR
Travelogue: Journeying Underground
Trip One: LSD
Trip Two: Psilocybin
Trip Three: 5-MeO-DMT (or, The Toad)
CHAPTER FIVE
The Neuroscience: Your Brain on Psychedelics
CHAPTER SIX
The Trip Treatment: Psychedelics in Psychotherapy
One: Dying
Two: Addiction
Three: Depression
Coda: Going to Meet My Default Mode Network
Epilogue: In Praise of Neural Diversity
Glossary
Acknowledgments
Notes
Bibliography
Index
About the Author


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How to Change Your Mind- What the New Science of Psychedelics Teaches Us About Consciousness
....
PENGUIN PRESS
An imprint of Penguin Random House LLC
375 Hudson Street
New York, New York 10014

DDC 615.7/883—dc23
LC record available at https://lccn.loc.gov/2018006190

PHIL JACKSON

and HUGH DELEHANTY


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Book Details
 Price
 3.00
 Pages
 313 p
 File Size 
 1,289 KB
 File Type
 PDF format
 ISBN
 978-1-10161796-0 
 Copyright©   
 Phil Jackson, 2013

EPIGRAPH 
When you do things from your soul,
you feel a river moving in you, a joy. RUMI

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The work on this book began during the winter of 2011–12 in the living room of
Phil’s house in Playa del Rey, California, a sleepy beach town. The room, a long
floor-through overlooking the Pacific, is filled with mementoes: an Edward
Curtis photo of a Kutenai brave gathering rushes in a canoe on Flathead Lake, a
totemlike painting of the Bulls’ second three-peat team, a giant replica of the
Lakers’ 2010 championship ring. Outside the full-length windows, Olympic
hopefuls could be seen practicing volleyball on the beach, while a parade of
Angelenos in brightly colored exercise wear streamed by on inline skates,
bicycles, razor scooters, and other earth friendly vehicles.

Every now and then, Phil would stop expounding on the wonders of the
triangle offense for a moment and gaze dreamily at the ocean. “Look,” he’d say,
pointing to a fishing boat heading out to sea or a small pod of dolphins frolicking
in the waves near shore. We’d sit in silence and watch for a while until Phil
decided it was time to get back to unraveling the mysteries of the Blind Pig or
some other arcane aspect of the Jacksonian game.

Tucked away in the rear of the room is a small meditation space enclosed by
Japanese-style paper screens, where Phil sits zazen most mornings. On one wall
hangs a beautiful calligraphic drawing of enso, the Zen symbol of oneness, with
these lines from Tozan Ryokai, a ninth-century Buddhist monk:
Do not try to see the objective world.
You which is given an object to see is quite different from you yourself.
I am going my own way and I meet myself which includes everything I meet.
I am not something I can see (as an object).
When you understand self which includes everything,
You have your true way.
This is the essence of what we’ve been trying to convey in this book: that the
path of transformation is to see yourself as something beyond the narrow
confines of your small ego—something that “includes everything.”
Basketball isn’t a one-person game, even though the media lords sometimes
portray it that way. Nor is it a five-person game, for that matter. It’s an intricate
dance that includes everything happening at any given moment—the tap of the
ball against the rim, the murmur of the crowd, the glint of anger in your
opponent’s eyes, the chatter of your own monkey mind.

The same is true with writing. Creating a book of this kind goes far beyond
the solitary work of two guys banging away at their laptops. Fortunately we’ve
been blessed throughout this project with an extraordinary team of men and
women who have contributed their insights, creative energy, and hard work to
make this book come to life.

First, we would like to thank our agent, Jennifer Rudolph Walsh at William
Morris Entertainment for helping give birth to this book and nurturing it along
the way. Big thanks also to agent extraordinaire Todd Musburger for his
perseverance, integrity, and gift for putting all the pieces together.
We owe a great debt to our publisher and editor, Scott Moyers, for holding
the vision of Eleven Rings from the start and making that vision real. Kudos, as
well, to Scott’s assistant, Mally Anderson, and the rest of the editorial team at
The Penguin Press for their Jordan-like grace under pressure.

We’d especially like to thank the players, coaches, journalists, and others
who took the time to share with us their personal reflections about Phil and the
events chronicled in these pages. In particular, we’re grateful to Senator Bill
Bradley and Mike Riordan for their insights re the Knicks; Michael Jordan,
Scottie Pippen, John Paxson, Steve Kerr, and Johnny Bach re the Bulls; and
Kobe Bryant, Derek Fisher, Rick Fox, Pau Gasol, Luke Walton, Frank Hamblen,
Brian Shaw, and Kurt Rambis re the Lakers. Thanks also to Bill Fitch, Chip
Schaefer, Wally Blase, George Mumford, Brooke Jackson, and Joe Jackson for
their invaluable contributions.

We’re especially indebted to writers Sam Smith and Mark Heisler for their
guidance and in-depth knowledge of the NBA. Chicago Sun-Times columnist
Rick Telander was also a great help, as were reporters Mike Bresnahan of the
Los Angeles Times and Kevin Ding of the Orange County Register.
A tip of the hat to Lakers PR wizard John Black and his team for parting the
waters as only he knows how. We’re also much obliged to Tim Hallam and his
crew at the Bulls.

Special thanks to Phil’s collaborators on previous books, authors Charley
Rosen (Maverick and More Than a Game) and Michael Arkush (The Last
Season), and photographers George Kalinsky (Take It All!) and Andrew D.
Bernstein (Journey to the Ring). We’ve also benefited from the perspectives of
other authors in these works: Bill Bradley’s Life on the Run, Phil Berger’s
Miracle on 33rd Street, Dennis D’Agostino’s Garden Glory, Red Holzman and
Harvey Frommer’s Red on Red, Roland Lazenby’s Mindgames and The Show,
David Halberstam’s Playing for Keeps, Sam Smith’s The Jordan Rules, Rick
Telander’s In the Year of the Bull, Elizabeth Kaye’s Ain’t No Tomorrow, and
Mark Heisler’s Madmen’s Ball.

In addition, we’d like to thank several journalists who’ve covered Phil and
his teams throughout his career for their insights, especially Frank Deford, Jack
McCallum, and Phil Taylor (Sports Illustrated); Tim Kawakami, Tim Brown,
Bill Plaschke, T. J. Simers, and Broderick Turner (Los Angeles Times); Melissa
Isaacson, Terry Armour, Skip Myslenski, Bernie Lincicome, and Bob Verdi
(Chicago Tribune); Lacy J. Banks, John Jackson, and Jay Mariotti (Chicago Sun-
Times); Tim Sullivan and Mark Ziegler (San Diego Union-Tribune); Howard
Beck and Mike Wise (New York Times); Mike Lupica (New York Newsday); J. A.
Adande, Ramona Shelburne, and Marc Stein (ESPN); and Michael Wilbon (Washington Post).

Researchers Sue O’Brian and Lyn Garrity did an exceptional job of making
sure we got our facts straight. Deep bows to Kathleen Clark for creating the
wonderful picture gallery, and to Brian Musburger and Liz Calamari for their
tireless effort promoting the book. Thanks also to Chelsea Jackson, Clay
McLachlan, John M. Delehanty, Jessica Catlow, Rebekah Berger, Amanda
Romeo, Gary Mailman, Amy Carollo, Caitlin Moore, Kathleen Nishimoto,
Gayle Waller, and Chrissie Zartman, for assistance beyond the call of duty.
Most of all, we are humbled by the love and support of the book’s biggest
champions, Barbara Graham and Jeanie Buss.

From the beginning Barbara has poured her heart and soul into this project
and lifted the book with her masterful editing and creative vision.
And if it weren’t for Jeanie, this book might never have been born. She is the
reason Phil came back to the Lakers for his second run. We have Jeanie to thank,
along with the late Dr. Jerry Buss, for giving Phil the chance to win his last two rings.
Phil Jackson and Hugh Delehanty
February 2013

Table of Contents
ALSO BY PHIL JACKSON
TITLE PAGE
COPYRIGHT
DEDICATION
EPIGRAPH

1 THE CIRCLE OF LOVE
2 THE JACKSON ELEVEN
3 RED
4 THE QUEST
5 DANCES WITH BULLS
6 WARRIOR SPIRIT
7 HEARING THE UNHEARD
8 A QUESTION OF CHARACTER
9 BITTERSWEET VICTORY
10 WORLD IN FLUX
11 BASKETBALL POETRY
12 AS THE WORM TURNS
13 THE LAST DANCE
14 ONE BREATH, ONE MIND
15 THE EIGHTFOLD OFFENSE
16 THE JOY OF DOING NOTHING
17 ONE-TWO-THREE—LAKERS!
18 THE WISDOM OF ANGER
19 CHOP WOOD, CARRY WATER
20 DESTINY’S CHILDREN
21 DELIVERANCE
22 THIS GAME’S IN THE REFRIGERATOR

PHOTOGRAPHS
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
INDEX
CREDITS

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