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Marcus J. Carey & Jennifer Jin


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 Copyright©   
 2019 by Marcus J. Carey 

Introduction
My mind is in a very peaceful and reflective mood. I’m
nearing the end of my first time away from work in at least
three years, most of which has been a blur as I founded my
own cybersecurity firm.

I’ve learned a lot about venture capital, investors, and
mentors—as well as what it takes to build a company from
just an idea. It’s been an amazing journey. My reputation
as a white hat hacker gave me the credibility to get this far,
and we’re just getting started.

I believe in giving as I go. In other words, instead of waiting
until I “make it” to give back to others, I have been trying
to mentor everyone I come across along the way. I have
always been the type to want to help others, so I mean
it when I say you’re welcome to email or meet me for
guidance about anything. I will always try my best to help.

Over the last year, I’ve listened to hundreds of hours
of audiobooks while going to and from work and while
walking the dogs. One of the books that really impressed
me was Tribe of Mentors by Timothy Ferriss, and it
stands as the inspiration for this book’s concept. I highly
recommend this thought-provoking read on life and
business, especially if you’re a fan of self-help books or entrepreneurship.

In his book, Ferriss asked famous people from his
impressive network eleven questions, and then the magic
just happens. For me, this immediately sparked the idea
that there should be a cybersecurity version of the book.
So, I compiled the most common questions people ask me
about cybersecurity and then narrowed it down to the list
you are about to see.

In total, I ended up with 14 questions. The questions
initially start with views of cybersecurity at-large and
then become more personal. I noticed that when I have
conversations at conferences, this is the normal flow. We
call these types of conversations “hallway-con,” because
some of the best learning happens between the scheduled
talks and events.

After compiling the questions, I started reaching out to
my network of friends and colleagues in the industry and
asked them to be a part of this book. I was humbled by
the response. In total, we ended up with 70 inspiring and
thought-provoking interviews with notable hackers—
including such luminaries as Lesley Carhart, David
Kennedy, and Bruce Potter.

But before we launch into the interviews, let’s take a quick
look at the questions:
1. If there is one myth that you could debunk in
cybersecurity, what would it be?
2. What is one of the biggest bang-for-the-buck
actions that an organization can take to improve
their cybersecurity posture?
3. How is it that cybersecurity spending is
increasing but breaches are still happening?
4. Do you need a college degree or certification
to be a cybersecurity professional?
5. How did you get started in the cybersecurity field,
and what advice would you give to a beginner
pursuing a career in cybersecurity?
6. What is your specialty in cybersecurity?
How can others gain expertise in your specialty?
7. What is your advice for career success when it
comes to getting hired, climbing the corporate
ladder, or starting a company in cybersecurity?
8. What qualities do you believe all highly successful
cybersecurity professionals share?
9. What is the best book or movie that can be
used to illustrate cybersecurity challenges?
10. What is your favorite hacker movie?
11. What are your favorite books for motivation,
personal development, or enjoyment?
12. What is some practical cybersecurity advice you
give to people at home in the age of social media
and the Internet of Things?
13. What is a life hack that you’d like to share?
14. What is the biggest mistake you’ve ever made,
and how did you recover from it?
Before we wrap up, a quick note about the book: We edited
every interview to improve flow and readability, and in
some cases, this meant abbreviating answers or deleting
non-responses. You’ll also notice that we’ve included
contact information at the end of each bio indicating where
you can find each hacker on the web, as well as on social
media. We’re an engaged and tight-knit group, and we
hope you’ll join us.

Creating this book has been an amazing journey, and I
hope the answers to these questions help guide you along your path.
Marcus J. Carey
CEO Threatcare
January 1, 2018

Table of Contents
Introduction 1
01 Marcus J. Carey 6
02 Ian Anderson 12
03 Andrew Bagrin 18
04 Zate Berg 24
05 Cheryl Biswas 28
06 Keirsten Brager 32
07 Evan Booth 38
08 Kyle Bubp 42
09 Lesley Carhart 48
10 Lee Carsten 54
11 Whitney Champion 60
12 Ming Chow 66
13 Jim Christy 72
14 Ian Coldwater 78
15 Dan Cornell 84
16 Kim Crawley 90
17 Emily Crose 96
18 Daniel Crowley 100
19 Winnona DeSombre 104
20 Ryan Dewhurst 110
21 Deidre Diamond 114
22 Ben Donnelly 118
23 Kimber Dowsett 130
24 Ronald Eddings 136
25 Justin Elze 140
26 Robert Graham 144
27 Claudio Guarnieri 150
28 Ron Gula 154
29 Jennifer Havermann 158
30 Teuta Hyseni 162
31 Terence Jackson 168
32 Ken Johnson 172
33 David Kennedy 178
34 Michelle Klinger 186
35 Marina Krotofil 192
36 Sami Laiho 200
37 Robert M. Lee 204
38 Kelly Lum 208
39 Tracy Z. Maleeff 212
40 Andy Malone 218
41 Jeffrey Man 224
42 Jim Manico 232
43 Kylie Martonik 236
44 Christina Morillo 240
45 Kent Nabors 244
46 Wendy Nather 252
47 Charles Nwatu 258
48 Davi Ottenheimer 264
Contents
49 Brandon Perry 274
50 Bruce Potter 280
51 Edward Prevost 284
52 Steve Ragan 288
53 Stephen A. Ridley 292
54 Tony Robinson 300
55 David Rook 306
56 Guillaume Ross 314
57 Brad Schaufenbuel 320
58 Chinyere Schwartz 326
59 Khalil Sehnaoui 330
60 Astha Singhal 338
61 Dug Song 342
62 Jayson E. Street 352
63 Ben Ten 358
64 Dan Tentler 362
65 Ben Tomhave 368
66 Robert "TProphet" Walker 374
67 Georgia Weidman 380
68 Jake Williams 384
69 Robert Willis 390
70 Robin Wood 394
Final Thoughts 399
Acknowledgments 400
Bibliography 401


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INFORMATION SYSTEMS, WEB AND PERVASIVE COMPUTING SERIES

Edited by Daniel Ventre


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Book Details
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 Copyright©   
 ISTE Ltd 2014 

Author Biographies
Dean Cheng is the Senior Research Fellow for Chinese
political and security affairs at the Asia Studies Center of
The Heritage Foundation. He specializes in Chinese military
and foreign policy, and has written extensively on Chinese
military doctrine, technological implications of its space
program, and “dual use” issues associated with China’s
industrial and scientific infrastructure.

Before joining The Heritage Foundation, he was a senior
analyst with the Center for Naval Analyses, a federally
funded research and development center, and a senior
analyst with Science Applications International Corporation
(SAIC), the Fortune 500 specialist in defense and homeland
security. He has testified before Congress, spoken at the
(American) National Defense University, US Air Force
Academy, and the National Space Symposium, and been
published in the Wall Street Journal and the Washington Post.

Alan Chong is Associate Professor at the S. Rajaratnam
School of International Studies in Singapore. He has
published widely on the notion of soft power and the role of
ideas in constructing the international relations of Singapore
and Asia. His publications have appeared in The Pacific
Review; International Relations of the Asia-Pacific; Asian
Survey; East Asia: an International Quarterly; Politics,
Religion and Ideology; the Review of International Studies;
the Cambridge Review of International Affairs and Armed
Forces and Society. He is also the author of Foreign Policy in
Global Information Space: Actualizing Soft Power (Palgrave,
2007). He is currently working on several projects exploring
the notion of ‘Asian international theory’. His interest in soft
power has also led to inquiry into the sociological and
philosophical foundations of international communication. In
the latter area, he is currently working on a manuscript
titled ‘The International Politics of Communication:
Representing Community in a Globalizing World’. In
tandem, he has pursued a fledgling interest in researching
cyber security issues. He has frequently been interviewed in
the Asian media and consulted in think-tank networks in the region.

Alice Ekman is Associate Research Fellow in charge of
China at the French Institute of International Relations
(Ifri), where she conducts analyses of major domestic and
foreign policy developments. She is an Adjunct Professor at
Sciences Po in Paris, and also lectures at the French
Institute for Higher National Defense Studies and the War
College. Alice Ekman was formerly Visiting Scholar at
Tsinghua University (Beijing), Research Officer at the
Embassy of France in China, and Consultant in a Parisbased
strategy firm. Fluent in Mandarin Chinese, she
regularly undertakes research fieldwork in China and East Asia.

She holds an MA from the London School of Economics in
International Relations, Economics, and Anthropology
(China focus), and a PhD in International Relations from
Sciences Po. Alice Ekman is currently a member of the EU
committee of the Council for Security Cooperation in the
Asia Pacific (CSCAP).

Thomas Flichy de La Neuville is Professor in
international relations at Saint-Cyr military academy.
Specialist of Iran, he has studied persian in the National
Institute of Oriental Languages an cultures and holds a PhD
in legal history. He is visiting professor in Oxford and
Annapolis. Amongst his recent publications, Iran-Russia-
China, a new mongol empire?

Xu Longdi is a PhD and Associate Research Fellow at
China Institute of International Studies (CIIS), Beijing. He
received his PhD in international relations from the
Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences
(CASS) in 2009 and joined CIIS the same year. His expertise
covers International Relations Theory, international
security, and EU politics and foreign policy. Now he runs a
program on “International Norms and Cyber Security”.
Samuel Cherian is Associate Fellow in the Strategic
Technologies Centre at the Institute for Defence Studies and
Analysis, an autonomous think tank affiliated to the Indian
Ministry of Defence. He has written on various cyber
security issues, including critical infrastructure protection,
cyber resilience, cybercrime, and internet governance. He
has also presented on these topics at seminars and round
tables around the world as well as different fora in India. His
recent publications include Cybersecurity and Cyberwar,
(October 2013 issue of Seminar magazine), Emerging Trends
in Cyber Security, (IDSA Web Comments March 28, 2012),
and Prospects for India-US Cyber Security Cooperation,
(Volume 31, Issue 2, Strategic Analysis September 2011).
His monograph Global, Regional and Domestic Dynamics of
Cybersecurity will be published shortly. He was co-ordinator
of the IDSA Task Force on Cyber Security which published a
report on “India's Cyber Security Challenges” in March 2012.
He holds a PhD from the Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi.

Daniel Ventre holds a PhD in Political Science
(University of Versailles). He is the Secretary General of
GERN (Groupe Européen de Recherches sur les Normativités –
European Research Group into Norms), researcher at
CESDIP (Center for Sociological Research on Law and
Criminal Justice Institutions. CNRS/University of
Versailles/Ministry of Justice), Chairholder in Cyber Security
& Cyber Defense (Saint-Cyr/Sogeti/Thales). He is the author
of a number of books and articles (published in French,
English and Chinese) on cyberwarfare, information warfare,
cyberconflict, cybersecurity and cyberdefense. He has published:
Information Warfare – 信息战, National Defense Industry Press, Beijing, 218 pages, January 2014.
Cyber Conflicts, Competing National Perspectives, ISTE, London and John Wiley & Sons, New York, May 2012, 330 pages.
Cyberwar and Information Warfare, ISTE, London and John Wiley & Sons, New York, July 2011, 448 pages.
Cyberattaque et Cyberdéfense, Paris, Editions Hermès Lavoisier, 
Collection “Cybercriminalité et Cyberconflits”, August 2011, 312 pages.
Cyberespace et acteurs du cyberconflit, Paris, Hermès Lavoisier, 
Collection “Cybercriminalité et Cyberconflits”, April 2011, 288 pages.
Cyberguerre et guerre de l’information. Stratégies, règles, enjeux, Paris, Hermès Lavoisier, Collection “Cybercriminalité et Cyberconflits”, September 2010, 318 pages.
Information Warfare, ISTE, London and John Wiley & Sons, New York, 2009, 298 pages.
La guerre de l’information, Paris, Hermès Lavoisier, Collection “Finance Gestion Management”, 2007.



Introduction
Regardless of the origins of cyberspace (those who
designed it, the founding fathers of computing, of telecoms,
of the Internet, the first to give financial backing to these
projects, etc.), what is important to look at in today’s world is
the current configuration of cyberspace, and its possible
future. Whilst a map of the under-sea cable networks shows
the Internet as being rather US-centered, or at least
organized around the triad of the USA, Europe and Asia,
with the other regions of the world appearing to lie on the
periphery, this centrality of infrastructures (root name
servers, computation capacities, data flux, etc.), but also of
investment, research, users, etc., is in the full throes of
evolution. Technology and knowledge are now being
disseminated throughout the world. Where it is impossible to
install hardwired technologies quickly enough, mobile
telephony is becoming an important means of access to the
Internet. Poorer populations are beginning to gain access to
a Web connection. Thus, modern technologies are able to
make their effects felt even in territories where they are not
as omnipresent as in the United States. The technology is
becoming more widely available, and we can see that the
barriers to development are not economic or technical, but
often political: the development of cyberspace, and the form
that it takes, are subject to the will of the political authorities.

Whilst the United States still seem, at present, to be the
dominant force in terms of the Internet and cyberspace, the
more widely the technology propagates, the less the number
of users is concentrated in the Western World. This evolution
of cyberspace is contributing to the current shift of power
(economic, political and strategic power) from America
toward Asia. The report “The World in 2025”1 affirms (and it
is not alone in doing so) that “the centre of gravity of world
production will move towards Asia [...] Before 2025 China
could become the second world economic power”. This shift is
not solely economic. It runs deeper, corresponding to the
shifting of the very foundations of the power of modern
nations: “Before 2025 China could become the second world
economic power [...] India and China could thus account for
approximately 20% of the world’s R&D”. The configuration of
cyberspace is constantly changing as well. There is no truly
stable balance. The same report highlights the effects this
evolution will inevitably have: “If the United States remain
the first military power, the scientific and technological
catching-up of some states, the new irregular war tactics and
the increasing importance of cyber-attacks will weaken their freedom of action”.

Although, evidently, the domination of cyberspace
(particularly in economic, political and military terms) depends
on more factors than simply the number of users in a state
(there are other variables determining the power balance in
cyberspace: political goals, industrial expertise, capital,
knowledge, data, infrastructure, the capacity to impose a
strategy on all three levels of cyberspace), the evolution of uses
and populations of users represents a major phenomenon,
because it also reflects the changing desires, political, economic
and ideological projects. This evolution reflects, or perhaps
heralds, a gradual transfer of power from one center (the
United States) to another (China). China is, without a doubt,
the major player in this reconfiguration. The stakes are
enormously high, because if, tomorrow, the 1.5 billion Chinese
were all to have access to the Internet, the configuration of
China’s cyberspace itself and of the world as a whole, would be
turned on its head. In cyberspace, Asia is becoming the most
important resource in terms of users, consumers, citizens, but
also (potentially at least) of creators, designers, although
innovation in these domains appears, as yet, to be concentrated
in Silicon Valley and in Israel (notably in the domain of
cybersecurity). The center of innovation, in the field of ICTs,
could, in time, be shifted from America, with its giants of
industry and research, to Asia. Even at this stage, China has
already developed its own solutions – alternatives to the tools
employed in the West (Facebook, Twitter, operating systems,
etc.), and its industrial players (e.g. Huawei and Lenovo) are in
the process of dethroning the historical international market
leaders. By exporting its technologies, and investing in the
development of infrastructure in developing countries, China is
also creating the conditions for future dependency on its
technologies. No doubt China will also be able to invest wisely
in technologies with a promising future – e.g. those which will
feed into the up-and-coming “Internet of Things” – firstly
because of its immense national market, but also because
engineers, who are already digital natives, constitute a
potential creative resource. In addition, a billion or more
Chinese citizens in cyberspace also represent phenomenal
quantities of data produced. It is a crucial focal point for
authorities, companies and even states to be able to cope with
these amounts of data. The capacities to innovate, invest and
deploy one’s technologies throughout the world constitute as
many variables of importance for the power of modern states.
Asia, and particularly China, intends to play the leading roles
in these domains.

Table of Contents
AUTHOR BIOGRAPHIES
INTRODUCTION
CHAPTER 1. CHINA’S INTERNET DEVELOPMENT AND
CYBERSECURITY – POLICIES AND PRACTICES
Xu LONGDI
1.1. Introduction
1.2. Internet development in China: an overview
1.3. China’s policies towards Internet development
1.3.1. From the very beginning of its development,
China’s Internet has been closely linked to the Chinese
economy, and was programmed and integrated
into its macro economic development blueprints
1.3.2. In addition to lending full policy support
to Internet development, China also invests heavily in
building Internet infrastructures
1.3.3. The Chinese government actively
promotes the R&D of next-generation Internet (NGI)
1.3.4. China practices a policy of managing cyber
affairs in line with law, adhering to the principles of
scientific and effective administration in its Internet governance
1.4. Cyber legislation and Internet administration
1.4.1. Basic principles and practices of Internet
administration in China
1.4.2. Guaranteeing the free and secure flow
of information in cyberspace
1.5. Cybersecurity and diplomacy: an international perspective
1.5.1. Cyber policy dialogue and consultation
1.5.2. Regional cyber cooperation
1.5.3. Track Ⅱ cyber diplomacy
1.5.4. Legal cooperation in combating cybercrimes
1.5.5. Technical cooperation
1.5.6. Office for Cyber Affairs of the MFA
1.6. A cybersecurity strategy in the making? 
1.6.1. Significance of the Internet for China 
1.6.2. Goals and objectives
1.6.3. Cyber threat landscape 
1.6.4. Means for strategic goals
1.7. Conclusion
CHAPTER 2. PLA VIEWS ON INFORMATIONIZED
WARFARE, INFORMATION WARFARE AND
INFORMATION OPERATIONS
Dean CHENG
2.1. The evolution of chinese military thinking
2.2. The growing importance of information
2.3. Information operations
2.3.1. Command and control missions 
2.3.2. Offensive information missions 
2.3.3. Defensive information missions
2.3.4. Information support and safeguarding missions
2.4. Key types of information operations
2.4.1. Electronic combat (dianzizhan; 电子战)
2.4.2. Network combat (wangluozhan; 网络战)
2.4.3. Psychological combat (xinlizhan; 心理战) 
2.4.4. Intelligence combat (qingbaozhan; 情报战)
2.4.5. Command and control combat (zhihuikongzhizhan; 指挥控制战)
2.4.6. Physical combat
2.5. Computer network warfare and information operations
CHAPTER 3. CHINA’S ADAPTIVE INTERNET
MANAGEMENT STRATEGY AFTER THE EMERGENCE OF
SOCIAL NETWORKS
Alice EKMAN
3.1. Weibo: the turning point
3.1.1. Adaptive behaviors 
3.1.2. Participative behaviors
3.2. Latest adjustments under Xi Jinping 
3.2.1. Smart management of the Internet: a top priority under the new leadership
3.2.2. “Guiding public opinion”
3.2.3. …while seizing economic opportunities
3.3. Bibliography 
CHAPTER 4. INDIA’S CYBERSECURITY – THE
LANDSCAPE
Cherian SAMUEL
4.1. A snapshot of Asian cyberspace
4.1.1. Aspects of cyberconflict in Asia 
4.1.2. West Asia 
4.1.3. East Asia
4.2. The Indian cyber landscape
4.3. The China challenge: a case study 
4.4. Responses
4.4.1. Implementing a national cybersecurity policy 
4.5. Creating an institutional framework
4.5.1. Ensuring supply chain integrity 
4.6. Takeaways 
CHAPTER 5. CHINA AND SOUTHEAST ASIA: OFFLINE
INFORMATION PENETRATION AND SUSPICIONS OF
ONLINE HACKING – STRATEGIC IMPLICATIONS FROM A
SINGAPOREAN PERSPECTIVE
Alan CHONG
5.1. Offline sphere: latent “diasporic” information
power and official Chinese soft power
5.2. The online sphere: hacktivism as mostly projections
5.3. Conclusion: offline politics strategically obscure online projections
5.4. Bibliography
CHAPTER 6. IMPACT OF MONGOLIA’S CHOICES IN
INTERNATIONAL POLITICS ON CYBERSECURITY
Daniel VENTRE
6.1. Mongolia’s cyberspace
6.2. Cyberspace and political stakes
6.2.1. Mongolia targeted by cyber-attacks 
6.2.2. Nationalism on the Internet
6.3. Information-space security policy.
CHAPTER 7. CHINA-IRAN-RUSSIA – A CYBERCOMMUNITY
OF INFORMATION? 
Thomas FLICHY DE LA NEUVILLE
7.1. The hall marks of cyber-cooperation
7.1.1. Pax cyber-mongolica
7.1.2. A cyber-community of information – the proof of Syria
7.1.3. The counter-point of Mali 
7.2. The geopolitical bases for the cyber-mongol  empire
7.2.1. An undeniable closer Sino-Iranian relationship
7.2.2. Arms sales in Russo-Iranian and Sino-Iranianrelations
7.2.3. Sino-Russian support for Iranian civil nuclear development
7.2.4. A clear-cut Sino-Russian diplomatic position on the Iranian program
7.2.5. Oil and gas at the heart of economic relations
7.3. Order in cyberspace: an absolute necessity within China
7.3.1. Interior order and exterior disorder
7.3.2. The appearance of peace and the necessity of secrecy
CHAPTER 8. DISCOURSE REGARDING CHINA: CYBERSPACE
AND CYBERSECURITY
Daniel VENTRE
8.1. Identification of prevailing themes 
8.1.1. Depictions of the Internet in China
8.1.2. Impact of cyberspace on Chinese society
8.1.3. The Chinese cyber threat
8.1.4. The Chinese army: its practices, capabilities and strategies
8.1.5. Espionage
8.1.6. China, cyberspace and international relations
8.1.7. Particular points from the Western perspective
8.2. The evolution of American discourse about
China, cybersecurity and cyber defense
8.2.1. The annual reports of the US Defense Department
8.2.2. Speeches of the Secretaries of Defense
8.2.3. Prospective analyses conducted by the
National Intelligence Council
8.3. Conclusion
GENERAL CONCLUSION
LIST OF AUTHORS
INDEX


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Introduction
When thinking about the issues of cyberspace, its
influence on the quality of international relations and on the
evolution of the world, and looking at the importance of
cyber strategies for national and international equilibria,
China is naturally at the center of the debate. The questions
are numerous: what are the variables affecting Chinese
power? What is China’s ambition – what role does it hope to
play on the international stage? In what ways can its society
and its political regime evolve? How does cyberspace fit in
with these issues of both internal and international politics?
What will be the consequences of the evolution of cyberspace
and of its use, for Chinese society, for other countries in the
region, and for the rest of the world? Are the proposals
formulated and the initiatives taken by China in terms of
governance of the Internet able to reshape the
interconnection of the world such as it is imagined and
defined by the West? The evolution of cyberspace, with the
central role that China now plays and will continue to play
for a long time to come, is now a matter of security and
national defense. Cybersecurity and cyberdefense are
political and strategic issues of prime importance. Practices,
intentions and projects in this field have a direct influence
on international relations. New actors, new forms of
relations between states, new powers, conflicts and power
distributions are taking shape throughout cyberspace.
The aim of this book is to analyze China’s policies,
strategies and practices in the area of cybersecurity and
cyberdefense; and also to analyze the effect they have on the
political and strategic choices made by other states.

Contributions to this work have come from seven
researchers, specializing in international relations and
issues of cybersecurity. The individual chapters are drawn
from a conference which took place in Paris, on 1 July 2013,
organized by the Chair of Cyberdefense and Cybersecurity
(Saint-Cyr / Sogeti / Thales).

Leverage the power of Python to encrypt and decrypt data 

Samuel Bowne

What this book covers

Chapter 1, Obfuscation, covers the Caesar cipher and ROT13, simple character
substitution ciphers, and base64 encoding. We then move on to XOR. In the end,
there are challenges to test your learning that involve cracking the Caesar
cipher, reversing base64 encoding, and deciphering XOR encryption without the key.
Chapter 2, Hashing, covers the older MD5 and the newer SHA hashing techniques
and also Windows password hashes. The weakest type of hashing is common
use, followed by Linux password hashes, which are the strongest type of hashing
in common use. Afterward, there are some challenges to complete. The first is to
crack some Windows hashes and recover passwords, then you will be tasked
with cracking hashes where you don't even know how many rounds of hashing
algorithm were used, and finally you will be asked to crack those strong Linux hashes.
Chapter 3, Strong Encryption, covers the primary mode used to hide data today. It
is strong enough for the US military. Then, there are two of its modes, ECB and
CBC; CBC being the stronger and more common one. We will also discuss the
padding oracle attack, which makes it possible to overcome some parts of AES
CBC if the designer makes an error and the overly informative error message
gives information to the attacker. Finally, we introduce RSA, the main public
key algorithm used today, which makes it possible to send secrets over an
insecure channel without having exchanged a gives private key. Following all
that, we will perform a challenge where, we will crack RSA in the case where it
is erroneously created with two similar prime numbers instead of two random prime numbers.

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Book Details
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 Pages
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 File Size
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 File Type
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 ISBN
 978-1-78953-444-3
 Copyright   
 2018 Packt Publishing 

About the Author
Sam Bowne has been teaching computer networking and security classes at City
College of San Francisco since 2000. He has given talks and hands-on training at
DEFCON, HOPE, B-Sides SF, B-Sides LV, BayThreat, LayerOne, Toorcon, and
many other schools and conferences. He has done his PhD and CISSP. He is a
DEF CON Black-Badge co-winner.

Preface
Cryptography has a long and important history in protecting critical systems and
sensitive information. This book will show you how to encrypt, evaluate,
compare, and attack data using Python. Overall, the book will help you deal with
the common errors in encryption and show you how to exploit them.

Who this book is for
This book is intended for security professionals who want to learn how to
encrypt data, evaluate and compare encryption methods, and how to attack them.

Table of Contents
Title Page
Copyright and Credits
Hands-On Cryptography with Python
Packt Upsell
Why subscribe?
PacktPub.com
Contributor
About the author
Packt is searching for authors like you
Preface
Who this book is for
What this book covers
To get the most out of this book
Download the example code files
Download the color images
Conventions used
Get in touch
Reviews
1. Obfuscation
About cryptography
Installing and setting up Python
Using Python on Mac or Linux
Installing Python on Windows
Caesar cipher and ROT13
Implementing the Caesar cipher in Python
ROT13
base64 encoding
ASCII data
Binary data
XOR
Challenge 1 – the Caesar cipher
Challenge 2 – base64
Challenge 3 – XOR
Summary
2. Hashing
MD5 and SHA hashes
What are hashes?
Windows password hashes
Getting hashes with Cain
MD4 and Unicode
Cracking hashes with Google
Cracking hashes with wordlists
Linux password hashes
Challenge 1 – cracking Windows hashes
Challenge 2 – cracking many-round hashes
Challenge 3 – cracking Linux hashes
Summary
3. Strong Encryption
Strong encryption with AES
ECB and CBC modes
ECB
CBC
Padding oracle attack
Strong encryption with RSA
Public key encryption
RSA algorithm
Implementation in Python
Challenge – cracking RSA with similar factors
Large integers in Python
What's next?
Cryptography within IoT
ZigBee cryptographic keys
Complexity of ZigBee key management
Bluetooth – LE
Summary
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To get the most out of this book
You do not need to have programming experience or any special computer. Any
computer that can run Python can do these projects, and you don't need much
math because we'll not be inventing new encryption techniques just to learn how
to use the pre-existing standard ones that don't require anything more than very
basic algebra.

Computational Techniques for Resolving Security Issues

Sanjib Sinha


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Book Details
 Price
 4.00 USD
 Pages
 426 p
 File Size
 8,196 KB
 File Type
 PDF format
 ISBN-13 (electronic) 
 ISBN-13 (pbk)
 978-1-4842-3891-2
 978-1-4842-3890-5
 Copyright   
 2018 by Sanjib Sinha  

About the Author
Sanjib Sinha is a certified .NET Windows and
web developer, specializing in Python, security
programming, and PHP; he won Microsoft’s
Community Contributor Award in 2011.
Sanjib Sinha has also written Beginning Ethical
Hacking with Python and Beginning Laravel for Apress.

About the Technical Reviewer
Vaibhav Chavan holds a certification in ethical hacking and has worked
as a security analyst in the IT world as well as in the banking, insurance,
and e-commerce industries. He now works as a security analyst in Mumbai
and has more than five years of experience in the IT industry. He has
hands-on experience in Kali Linux and other tools such as the Metasploit
Framework, Burp Suite, Nessus, and more.

Introduction
You can get started in white-hat ethical hacking using Kali Linux, and this
book starts you on that road by giving you an overview of security trends,
where you will learn about the OSI security architecture. This will form the
foundation for the rest of Beginning Ethical Hacking with Kali Linux.
With the theory out of the way, you’ll move on to an introduction to
VirtualBox, networking terminologies, and common Linux commands,
followed by the step-by-step procedures to build your own web server and
acquire the skill to be anonymous. When you have finished the examples
in the first part of your book, you will have all you need to carry out safe
and ethical hacking experiments.

After an introduction to Kali Linux, you will carry out your first
penetration tests with Python and code raw binary packets for use in those
tests. You will learn how to find secret directories of a target system, how to
use a TCP client in Python and services, and how to do port scanning using
Nmap. Along the way, you will learn how to collect important information;
how to track e-mail; and how to use important tools such as DMitry,
Maltego, and others. You’ll also take a look at the five phases of penetration testing.

After that, this book will cover SQL mapping and vulnerability analysis
where you will learn about sniffing and spoofing, why ARP poisoning is a
threat, how SniffJoke prevents poisoning, how to analyze protocols with
Wireshark, and how to use sniffing packets with Scapy. Then, you will learn
how to detect SQL injection vulnerabilities, how to use Sqlmap, and how to
do brute-force or password attacks. In addition, you will learn how to use
important hacking tools such as OpenVas, Nikto, Vega, and Burp Suite.
The book will also explain the information assurance model and
the hacking framework Metasploit, taking you through important
commands, exploits, and payload basics. Moving on to hashes and
passwords, you will learn password testing and hacking techniques with
John the Ripper and Rainbow. You will then dive into classic and modern
encryption techniques where you will learn to work with the conventional
cryptosystem.

In the final chapter, you will use all the skills of hacking to exploit a
remote Windows and Linux system, and you will learn how to “own” a
remote target entirely.

Table of Contents
About the Author ...............................................................................xiii
About the Technical Reviewer ............................................................xv
Acknowledgments ............................................................................xvii
Introduction .......................................................................................xix
Chapter 1: Security Trends
Nature and Perspective .........................................................................................3
Before and After the Digital Transformation ..........................................................6
The OSI Security Architecture ...............................................................................6
Security Attacks, Services, and Mechanisms .....................................................10
Timeline of Hacking .......................................................................................14
How to Use Google Hacking Techniques .............................................................15
Further Reading ..................................................................................................17
Chapter 2: Setting Up a Penetration Testing and Network
Security Lab
Why Virtualization? .............................................................................................20
Installing VirtualBox ............................................................................................21
Installing Appliances on VirtualBox ...............................................................23
Installing VirtualBox Guest Addition ...............................................................29
Installing Metasploitable ...............................................................................31
Installing Windows ........................................................................................33
Installing Kali in VMware .....................................................................................36
Chapter 3: Elementary Linux Commands
Finding the Kali Terminal ....................................................................................42
Navigating the File System .................................................................................44
Working with Text Files .......................................................................................48
Searching Files ...................................................................................................49
Writing to the Terminal ........................................................................................51
Working with Directories .....................................................................................52
Setting File Permissions .....................................................................................53
Chapter 4: Know Your Network
Networking Layers ..............................................................................................61
Internetworking Models ......................................................................................65
OSI .................................................................................................................65
TCP/IP ............................................................................................................68
Further Reading ..................................................................................................69
Chapter 5: How to Build a Kali Web Server
Why Do You Need a Web Server? ........................................................................72
Introducing Sockets ............................................................................................73
Beginning the Web Server ..................................................................................73
Diving into Sockets .............................................................................................76
Installing PyCharm and the Wing IDE Editor .......................................................84
How to Stay Anonymous .....................................................................................86
Changing Your Proxy Chain ............................................................................88
Working with DNS Settings ...........................................................................92
Using a VPN ...................................................................................................94
Changing Your MAC Address .......................................................................100
Chapter 6: Kali Linux from the Inside Out 
More About Kali Linux Tools ..............................................................................106
Information Gathering ..................................................................................107
Vulnerability Analysis ...................................................................................108
Wireless Attacks ..........................................................................................109
Web Applications .........................................................................................109
WPS Tools ....................................................................................................110
Exploitation Tools .........................................................................................111
Forensic Tools ..............................................................................................111
Sniffing and Spoofing ..................................................................................112
Password Attacks ........................................................................................112
Maintaining Access .....................................................................................113
Reverse Engineering ...................................................................................113
Hardware Hacking .......................................................................................114
Exploring Kali Linux from the Inside .................................................................114
Machine Language ......................................................................................114
Registers .....................................................................................................115
Why Is Understanding Memory So Important? ............................................116
Editors .........................................................................................................117
Hacking Tools ..............................................................................................121
Staying Updated with SSH ................................................................................124
Getting Started ............................................................................................125
Working with Blacklists and Whitelists .......................................................128
Securing SSH ...............................................................................................130
Connecting to Kali Linux Over SSH ..............................................................134
Chapter 7: Kali Linux and Python
What Is Penetration Testing? ...........................................................................137
First Penetration Using Python ..........................................................................139
Whois Searches for More Information .........................................................142
Finding Secret Directories ...........................................................................152
Top-Level Domain Scanning ........................................................................158
Obtaining a Web Site’s IP Address ...............................................................161
TCP Client in Python and Services ....................................................................164
Capturing Raw Binary Packets ..........................................................................170
Port Scanning Using Nmap ...............................................................................174
Importing the Nmap Module ........................................................................175
What Does Nmap Do? ..................................................................................180
Nmap Network Scanner ..............................................................................183
Chapter 8: Information Gathering 
Python Virtual Environment ...............................................................................190
Reconnaissance Tools .......................................................................................197
Know the Domain and Hostname ................................................................198
E-mail Tracking Made Easy .........................................................................200
Searching the Internet Archive ....................................................................202
Passive Information .....................................................................................204
Web Spiders Are Crawling ...........................................................................205
More About Scanning ..................................................................................206
You Can Find Location Too! ..........................................................................213
DMitry, Maltego, and Other Tools .......................................................................214
Summarizing the Five Phases of Penetration ...................................................220
Chapter 9: SQL Mapping
Sniffing and Spoofing ........................................................................................221
Packing and Unpacking with Python ...........................................................223
Why Wireless Media Is Vulnerable ...............................................................227
ARP Poisoning Is a Threat ............................................................................228
SQL Injection .....................................................................................................241
Detecting SQL Injection Vulnerabilities ........................................................242
How to Use sqlmap ......................................................................................243
Brute-Force or Password Attacks .....................................................................253
Chapter 10: Vulnerability Analysis
Overview of Vulnerability Analysis Tools ...........................................................259
How to Use OpenVas .........................................................................................260
How to Use Nikto ..............................................................................................268
How to Use Vega ...............................................................................................270
How to Use Burp Suite ......................................................................................276
Chapter 11: Information Assurance Model 
What the AI Model Is All About ..........................................................................284
How to Tie the Elements Together? ...................................................................285
How the AI Model Works ...................................................................................287
Why Is the AI Model Important? ........................................................................289
Further Reading ................................................................................................290
Chapter 12: Introducing Metasploit in Kali Linux
Understanding the Metasploit Architecture ......................................................292
Summarizing Modules ......................................................................................295
Mixins and Plugins in Ruby ...............................................................................302
Metasploit Console or Interface ........................................................................304
Exploits and Payloads in Metasploit .................................................................308
How to Use Exploit and Payloads ................................................................309
How to Start Exploits ...................................................................................315
Chapter 13: Hashes and Passwords 
Hashes and Encryption .....................................................................................324
Password Testing Tools .....................................................................................327
John the Ripper and Johnny .............................................................................338
How to Use RainbowCrack ................................................................................342
Chapter 14: Classic and Modern Encryption
Nature and Perspective .....................................................................................348
Models of the Cryptography System .................................................................352
Types of Attacks on Encrypted Messages .........................................................354
Chapter 15: Exploiting Targets
Exploiting Linux with Metasploit .......................................................................358
Exploiting Samba .........................................................................................359
Exploiting IRC ..............................................................................................371
Exploiting Windows with Armitage ....................................................................380
Index .................................................................................................405

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Who This Book Is For
This book is primarily for information security professionals. However,
security enthusiasts and absolute beginners will also find this book
helpful. For absolute beginners, knowledge of high school algebra,
the number system, and the Python programming language is a plus.
However, this book provides an explanation of the foundational rules so
you can understand the relationship between them and ethical hacking,
information security, and the hacking-related tools of Kali Linux.
For more advanced professionals, the book also includes in-depth analysis.

Whether you are new to ethical hacking or a seasoned veteran, this
book will help you understand and master many of the powerful and
useful hacking-related tools of Kali Linux and the techniques that are
widely used in the industry today.
To start with, you need a virtual box or virtual machine, so proceed to Chapter 1.
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