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 A Witch’s Guide to Herbal Folklore and Enchantments 

by Gerina Dunwich

1. Witchcraft. 2. Herbs—Miscellanea.


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Book Details
 Price
 4.00
 Pages
 578 p
 File Size 
 1,904 KB
 File Type
 PDF format
 ISBN
 1-56414-575 (pbk.)
 Copyright©   
 2002 by Gerina Dunwich 

About the Author
Gerina Dunwich (whose first name is pronounced
“Jereena”) is a practicing Witch, an ordained minister (Universal
Life Church), and a respected spokesperson for the Pagan
community. She considers herself to be a lifelong student
of the occult arts and is the author of numerous books on the
spellcasting arts and the earth-oriented religion of Wicca. Her
most popular titles include Exploring Spellcraft, The Wicca
Spellbook, Wicca Craft, The Pagan Book of Halloween, Wicca
Candle Magick, Everyday Wicca, Wicca Love Spells, and Your Magickal Cat.

Born under the sign of Capricorn with an Aries rising and
her moon in Sagittarius, Gerina is also a professional astrologer
and Tarot reader whose diverse clientele include a number
of Hollywood celebrities and fellow occult authors. She is the
High Priestess of the Coven of the Dark Shadows (formerly
Coven Mandragora), and is the founder of the Bast-Wicca tradition,
the Pagan Poets Society, and the Wheel of Wisdom
School. Gerina is also a poet and a cat-lover. She writes and
plays music and has lived in various parts of world, including
a 300-year-old Colonial house near Salem, Massachusetts, and
a haunted Victorian mansion in upstate New York. Her interests
include herbal folklore, mythology, spiritualism, divination,
dreamwork, hypnotism, and past-life regression. Gerina
currently lives in Southern California with her Gemini soul
mate and their feline familiars.

Introduction
Throughout history and throughout the world, herbs have
played a major role in magick, religion, superstition, and divination,
as well as in the development of humankind.
Witches and Pagan folk the world over have held a special
relationship with herbs since the days of antiquity. Developing
various methods to harness the magickal energies contained within
flowers, leaves, roots, and bark, they have used them as tools for
healing, divination, spellcrafting, and connecting with Deity.
The ancients believed that all herbs possessed a spirit, or,
as in the case of many poisonous or mind-altering plants, a
demon. Nearly every culture has recognized the occult vibrations
of herbs, and attributed certain magickal properties to
their native plants and trees.

It is said in the Magic and Medicine of Plants (Reader’s
Digest), “Our distant ancestors did not need to be trained
botanists to observe and appreciate the remarkable energy and
diversity of the plant world.”
Early civilizations sought to harness and direct the magickal
powers of plants for curing diseases, warding off misfortune,
divining the future, and appeasing the gods. In ancient Egypt,
a land that has been described as “an ideal breeding ground”
for magickal herbalism, plants such as the lotus, the papyrus
reed, and the onion (which was often presented as a sacrificial
offering to the gods) were greatly revered and believed to possess
spiritual virtues.

Despite the fact that myrrh trees were not native to Egypt,
myrrh played a vital role in the religious and magickal ceremonies
of the ancient Egyptians. The fragrant aroma produced
by the burning of myrrh was believed to be pleasing to
the gods. Myrrh was burned every day at the midday hour as
an offering to the sun god Ra, and was also fumed in the temples
where the goddess Isis was worshipped.

The people of ancient Greece and Rome linked their native
trees and plants to the gods and goddesses of their pantheons.
In the old Greek and Roman religions, plant myths
figured predominantly. Tales of mortals and gods alike being
transformed into trees were common, and nearly every deity
was known to have held one or more tree and/or plant as a sacred symbol.

Historically, belief in the magickal properties of plants was
by no means restricted only to Pagans and pre-Christian religions.
Numerous references to herbal magick and botanomancy
(the art and practice of divination by plants) can be found
throughout the Bible, from the burning bush oracle of Moses,
to Rachel’s use of mandrake roots to magickally increase her
fertility, to Jacob’s magickal use of striped poplar, almond, and
plane-tree rods to bring forth striped, speckled, and spotted
livestock offspring.

During the Middle Ages, Witches (or, perhaps more accurately,
women and men who were accused of being Witches)
were believed to have employed a wide variety of plants to
bring about evil, as well as to do good if they so desired. Those
who made use of poisonous plants such as hemlock and henbane
to lay curses or cause mischief were labeled “Black
Witches.” Those who applied their herbal wisdom for the benefit
of others (such as for healing or working love magick) earned
for themselves the reputation of a “White Witch” (which was
equated to being a good Witch.) Those who were “White
Witches” were far more respected in most circles than their
“Black” counterparts. But of course not all Witches were exclusively
“White” or “Black.” Those who practiced a little bit
of both were said to be “Gray.
However, as a charge of Witchcraft (regardless of its “color”)
oftentimes resulted in a death sentence preceded by the most
heinous acts of torture, wise Witches of old needed to carefully
practice their craft veiled behind the shadows of secrecy.
A great deal of what little botanical witch lore remains from
centuries past is contained in the transcripts of the Witchcraft
trials that took place during the Burning Times. “From such
sources,” observe the editors of Magic and Medicine of Plants,
“we gather that witches were heirs to ancient lessons about the
medicinal properties of many substances found in nature. The
Witches preserved and continued to use plant lore that the
Christian church had suppressed as ‘heathen’ mysteries.”
In the United States, magickal herbalism is largely rooted
in European botanical lore brought across the Atlantic by immigrants
from distant lands, and influenced to varying degrees
by Native American herb lore and the plant magick
practiced by African slaves.

In contemporary times, as it has been in the past, herbal
magick remains an essential part of the Witches’ craft. It can
be used to assist an individual in attracting a compatible lover,
landing the right job, changing bad luck into good, and even
increasing one’s wealth! Empowered by the energies of Goddess
Earth and her elementals, herbs have long been used as
amulets to protect against evil, dried and burned as magickal
incense during rituals, and added to flying ointments and cauldron brews.

Herbs can be used to cure or to curse, as well as to conjure
or to banish supernatural entities. They can enchant our gardens
and our homes, and guide us on the path to transformation
and self-improvement. But, most importantly, herbal
magick can open the door to spiritual realms and other worlds,
and serve to connect a human being with Mother Nature and the Divine.

There probably exists no plant or tree that hasn’t at one
time, in some part of the world, been used in a spell or potion,
or utilized as an amulet. And it is said that all parts of a plant,
whether they be roots, buds, flowers, stems, or bark, are magickally significant.
Herbs are Mother Nature’s gifts to all of humankind, regardless
of spiritual beliefs, magickal tradition, or culture. And
whether you pride yourself as a country Witch or an urban
Pagan, herbs can reward you with a wealth of enchantment, divination, and folklore.
Blessed be!


Table of Contents
Foreword.......................................................................9
Introduction................................................................13
Chapter 1 Pagan Herb Lore.........................................................17
Chapter 2 Herbal Superstitions A to Z.........................................35
Chapter 3 Herbal Divination.......................................................49
Chapter 4 Tasseography...............................................................61
Chapter 5 Healing by Root and Flower........................................69
Chapter 6 Herbs of the Ancient Sorcerers.....................................79
Chapter 7 Hoodoo Herbs............................................................85
Chapter 8 Gypsy Herb Magick....................................................91
Chapter 9 Magick in Bloom........................................................99
Chapter 10 A Garden of Dreams...................................................115
Chapter 11 Herbal Correspondences.............................................139
Chapter 12 Where to Buy Magickal Herbs...................................187
Chapter 13 Gods and Goddesses...................................................195
Appendix
A Calendar of Magickal Herb Lore..............................213
“Elemental Magick”.................................................227
Bibliography..............................................................229
Index...........................................................................233
About the Author.....................................................239

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by SHELLY WU

Love is of all passions the strongest, for it attacks

simultaneously the head, the heart and the senses.

—Lao Tzu (Laozi)


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Book Details
 Price
 2.50
 Pages
 256 p
 File Size 
 3,492 KB
 File Type
 PDF format
 ISBN-13
 ISBN-10
 978-1-56414-921-3
  1-56414-921-8
 Copyright©   
 2007 by Shelly Wu  

About the Author
LIKE MOST OF THOSE BORN INTO a year of the defending Dog, Shelly
Wu spent a fair amount of her childhood fighting bullies and taking up the
gauntlet for the picked on and the friendless. Shelly no longer scuffles with
bullies, but she still maintains her soapboxes. She adheres to the teaching of
Laozi: “In the perception of the smallest is the secret of clear vision; in the
guarding of the weakest is the secret of all strength.”

Those who have met Shelly Wu say she has a certain “spark” that is
unmistakable. Using an eclectic mixture of metaphysics and psychology,
she has been dubbed the “Dear Abby” of Chinese astrology. Wu’s horoscope
columns and feature articles have appeared in aMagazine: Inside
Asian America, The Rainbow News, Psychic Interactive, Your Stars,
InTouch, and LIFE magazine. Her articles have been featured by the
Associated Press, ABC News, the BBC, and Wireless Flash news services.

In 1995, she brought this ancient art to the World Wide Web, and continues
to maintain the popular website, www.chineseastrology.com. She is
also the author of Chinese Astrology: Exploring the Eastern Zodiac (New
Page Books, 2005), and can be heard on radio talk shows worldwide.

Introduction
Whether a mind-blowing quickie or an orgasmic marathon, few things
can equal the intense pleasure of love and sex. The heart-pounding thrill
of romantic love is a universal human pursuit; we have all loved and lost
and loved and won, but mostly we have just loved. Indeed, love is the
universal language and the very essence of our being. Therefore, there
comes a time when most of us are faced with the pivotal decision of choosing
a partner. This is a decision that will affect our chance for relationship
happiness and future sexual satisfaction.

From the earliest Chinese records, the sex act between a man and a
woman was seen as a powerful and essential force that controlled the universe.
According to the Tao Te Ching, sexual energy is the force in nature
that keeps the “earth circling the heavens.” The merging of man and
woman—yang and yin—was thought to be of the highest spiritual realms
and a reflection of an organized and sacred universe. Therefore, the
importance of making love was highly emphasized, not only for physical
well-being and longevity, but for emotional and spiritual cultivation as well.

Thousands of years ago, the ancient Chinese understood the need for
sex education. They had “pillow books,” popular wedding gifts for young
couples containing everything from astrological compatibility to erotic suggestions
for igniting passion. These erotic and exquisitely detailed books
were meant to be tucked under the pillow of a young bride; they completed
her trousseau and were meant for her and her lover’s education and
excitement. These books taught couples to be generous with each other—
not merely for enjoyment, but to fulfill the man’s essential need for the
woman’s yin energy and the woman’s concurrent need for the man’s yang essence.

Table of Contents
Introduction 9
PART I SPIRIT CONNECTIONS
Chapter 1 Chinese Love Signs—Karmic Connections 17
Chapter 2 Yin/Yang—Stillness and Movement 21
Chapter 3 Love Written in the Stars— 25
Soul Mate Connections
Chapter 4 Love Trinities—Lovers in Trine 29
Chapter 5 Lovers in Kind 35
Chapter 6 Lovers Resolving Karma 39
Chapter 7 Lovers in Opposition 43
Chapter 8 Lovers Locked in Karmic Combat 47
Chapter 9 The Elements of Connection— 53
Are You Elementally Compatible?
PART II MIND CONNECTIONS
Chapter 10 Readying the Mind for Extraordinary Sex 79
Chapter 11 Resolving Blocks to Intimacy 81
Chapter 12 The Superior Lover 97
Chapter 13 Seduction and Romance, Atmosphere 99
and Ambiance: Setting the Mood
PART III BODY CONNECTIONS
Chapter 14 “Ching Qi”—Channeling Raw 115
Sexual Energy
Chapter 15 Sizzling Sex in the Taoist Tradition 125
Chapter 16 Sexual Styles: The Tame, the Tawdry, 131
and—Sometimes—the Taboo
Chapter 17 Randy Rat 137
Chapter 18 Oral Ox 145
Chapter 19 Titillating Tiger 153
Chapter 20 Receptive Rabbit 159
Chapter 21 Dragon Debauchery 167
Chapter 22 Sexy Snake 175
Chapter 23 Horse Hottie 181
Chapter 24 Go-Go Goat 189
Chapter 25 Marathon Monkey 195
Chapter 26 Rough-and-Ready Rooster 201
Chapter 27 Dog-gie Style 209
Chapter 28 Perfectly Perverted Pig 217
Chapter 29 “A Thousand Loving Thrusts”: 223
The Chinese Art of Penile Thrusting
Appendix A Taoist Sexual Positions for 227
Enlightened Lovers
Appendix B Find Your Chinese Birth Sign 237
Bibliography 243
Index 245
About the Author 253


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In contrast to the misogynistic sexual repression of women common in
many other ancient (and modern) cultures, Taoist masters encouraged the
complete satisfaction of a woman sexually. Young men were taught that to
ensure their own satisfaction, and for the balance of yin and yang to occur,
they must seek to satisfy their lover completely. This attitude of sexual
wholesomeness stood in stark contrast to some of the Western views of
sex. In the East, sex was a health issue and not a moral one. Eastern sages
and medical doctors extolled the sexual act for health and happiness, while
their Western equivalents imbued sex with the oppressive and repressive
rhetoric of caveats, restrictions, and taboos.

The Chinese obsession with, and celebration of, the erotic is graphically
demonstrated in Chinese art, archaeological records, and ancient literary
sources. From the erotic imagery of 200 B.C. tomb decorations to the
10th century crystal penis on display at the Museum of Ancient Chinese
Sexual Culture in Tongli, the extraordinary role that sexuality played in the
daily lives of the Chinese people is explicitly evident. While the art of love
in ancient China appeared to be phallic-oriented, it was widely believed
that sexual intercourse enhanced one’s internal spiritual practice and unified
the physical with the spiritual—something that would be of benefit to
both sexes. Moreover, misogyny against women was virtually unheard of
in China until much later in the country’s history. The Chinese have a long
and rich history of celebrating their sexuality in a positive and healthy
way. The art of sexuality was practiced with the goal of transforming the
mundane into a higher spiritual plane—the ultimate intent being oneness
with each other and with the natural world.

Recently in the West, there has been an ever-increasing awareness of
the importance of fusing our spiritual, mental, and physical energies in
order to achieve complete satisfaction. This awareness has yielded an
explosion of renewed interest in ancient erotic manuals, such as the Secrets
of the Jade Bed Chamber from China, the Kama Sutra from India,
and the Ishimpo from Japan. In a quest to reconnect with passion and
enrich their sexual experience, many couples are exploring Taoist, Tantric,
and astrological compatibilities regarding sexuality.
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