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- Home-Crafted Remedies for Health and Beauty -

From The Creators of The

New York Times Bestseller

Essential Oils for Beginners

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Book Details
 Price
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 Pages
 368 p
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 ISBN
 Print 978-1-942411-09-3
 eBook 978-1-942411-10-9
 Copyright©   
 2015
 by Sonoma Press, Berkeley, California

Introduction
While you might be curious about the healing power of plant-based
medicines and products, maybe you’re reluctant to dip a toe into these
seemingly ethereal waters. But you don’t have to give up over-thecounter
medicine to get on board with herbal treatments. In all
likelihood, herbs are already a part of your self-medication or
beautification routine—you just don’t realize it. Look closely at the
ingredient list on many facial creams and cleansers, shampoos and
conditioners, and even cough drops. You’ll likely find herbal extracts of
many of the ingredients discussed in this book.

Introducing yourself to alternative treatments doesn’t mean you have to bond
with the goddess or Earth Mother labels that herbal medicine has been associated
with in the past. All that this book requires is your sincere interest in learning
about remedies that can prevent and heal discomforts, plus the side effects of
living in a fast-paced modern world. Stress headaches and fatigue are just two
common examples of conditions that can be treated effectively with herbal
remedies. Between the covers of this book you’ll also find recipes for everyday
beauty and body care, mental health, personal “intimate” care that you can share
with your special someone, household products, and other remedies for
emotional and physical well-being. Who doesn’t want that?
Chapter 1 will give you the scoop on what constitutes herbal medicine, how
successful it is in both preventing and curing ailments, the importance of
aromatherapy in your mental and physical health, plus how and why the herbal approach works.
Chapter 2 is where the real fun starts. You’ll learn just three simple steps to
starting your own indoor garden, the proper tools you need to get started, and
which herbs to grow first. But this book isn’t limited to those who have, or
aspire to have, a green thumb. The remainder of the chapter introduces the many
preparations—from herbal teas to massage compresses to facial scrubs—you can
get started making. The chapter also covers what to shop for to stock your herbal workshop.
Chapters 3 and 4 talk herb, providing an accessible, need-to-know education
on a shortlist of herbs. Chapter 3 profiles five must-have herbs you’ll want to
have on hand, and then Chapter 4 goes into the 30 you should consider for your
healing arsenal. You’ll learn why they’re essential, what makes them so
powerful, how they’re used in a variety of ways, and how they can be grown.
Chapters 5 through 11 contain more than 200 recipes for the common issues
associated with our health, skin, and home, issues that most of us are likely to
encounter during the course of our lives.
Consult the handy Glossary at any point if you need help absorbing specific
terminology used in this book.

If you’re ready to put the power of your health into your own hands, this is
your book. Not only will you learn how to boost your metabolism to prevent
disease and illness, you’ll also explore remedies that speed healing, cure all
kinds of physical conditions, and improve your overall well-being. Even better,
herbal medicine doesn’t have to be an all-or-nothing endeavor. It can be used to
complement whatever healing methods you currently use with the idea that when
herbs are working for you, your need for commercial products lessens.

NO-NONSENSE HERBAL KNOW-HOW
Before you get your hands dirty, check out chapters 1 and 2 to find out all you
need to know about the basics of DIY herbal medicine and how to make selfcare
fit into a modern lifestyle with optimal results. When finished, you’ll be
armed with must-have tools, easy tips, manageable shopping lists, and more.
Have fun!
....


Table of Contents
Introduction
PART 1 NO-NONSENSE HERBAL KNOW-HOW
1. Herbal Medicine and You
2. The Herbal Workshop
PART 2 THE HERBS
3. The Fabulous Five: Your Must-Have Herbs
CHAMOMILE
ECHINACEA
GARLIC
PEPPERMINT
CALENDULA
4. The Thirty Worthy: Thirty Herbs for Beauty and Overall Health
ALOE VERA
ARNICA
BLACK COHOSH
BURDOCK
CAYENNE
CLOVE
COMFREY
EUCALYPTUS
GERANIUM
GINGER
GINSENG
GOLDENSEAL
HOPS
HYSSOP
LAVENDER
LEMON BALM
LICORICE
MULLEIN
PASSIONFLOWER
RASPBERRY
ROSEHIPS
ROSEMARY
SAGE
SELF-HEAL
SLIPPERY ELM
ST. JOHN’S WORT
THYME
VALERIAN
WITCH HAZEL
YARROW
PART 3 THE REMEDIES (PLUS A FEW PRODUCTS)
5. Face and Hair Care
ACNE
CHAPPED LIPS
COLOR-DAMAGED HAIR
CROW’S FEET & LAUGH LINES
DANDRUFF
DRY SKIN
DULL, DRY HAIR
ECZEMA OF THE FACE
OILY HAIR
PUFFY EYES
ROSACEA
SPLIT ENDS
6. Body Care
ATHLETE’S FOOT
BODY ACNE
BODY ODOR
CONTACT DERMATITIS
DRY SKIN
ECZEMA
FOOT ODOR
HAND & NAIL CARE
HYPERPIGMENTATION
PSORIASIS
SPIDER VEINS/VARICOSE VEINS
SUNBURN
7. Under the Underwear
ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION
JOCK ITCH
MENSTRUAL PAIN & CRAMPS
PAINFUL SEX
URINARY TRACT INFECTION
VAGINAL ODOR
YEAST INFECTION
8. Mental Health and Wellness
ADDICTION & SUBSTANCE ABUSE
ADHD
ANXIETY–OCD
ANXIETY–PTSD
BIPOLAR DISORDER
DEPRESSION
EATING DISORDERS
INSOMNIA
MEMORY PROBLEMS
MOODINESS
NERVOUS TENSION
STRESS
9. Common Ailments
ALLERGIES
BACKACHE
BLISTER
BRUISE
BUG BITES
BURN
CANKER SORE/COLD SORE
COLD & FLU
CONSTIPATION
CUTS & SCRAPES
DIARRHEA
EARACHE
FEVER
FLATULENCE
GASTROINTESTINAL DISTRESS (GI DISTRESS)
HEADACHE & MIGRAINE
HEARTBURN/INDIGESTION
HEMORRHOIDS
HIVES
JOINT & MUSCLE PAIN
LARYNGITIS
NAUSEA/MORNING SICKNESS
POISON IVY
PMS
SINUSITIS
SLEEP DEPRIVATION
SORE THROAT
SPRAIN/STRAIN
TOOTHACHE
WARTS
10. Around the House
ANT INFESTATION
DISH DETERGENT
DISINFECTANT
FLEAS
FURNITURE POLISH
LAUNDRY
MICE
MOLD & MILDEW
MOTHS
PET ODOR
11. The Day After
BREAKUP
DEATH OF A PET
DRINKING BINGE
FENDER BENDER
HOME FROM THE HOLIDAYS
INTERNATIONAL FLIGHT
LAYOFF OR FIRING
MOVING HOUSE
OVEREATING
TV BINGE WATCH
Glossary
Herbal Beauty Care Kit
Mental Wellness Care Kit
Resources
References


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Photo credits: Shannon Oslick, pg. 2; Shannon Oslick, pg. 6; Shannon Oslick, pg. 8; Shannon
Oslick, pg. 10-11; Shannon Oslick, pg. 12; s_bukley/shutterstock.com, pg. 22; Shannon Oslick,
pg. 24; Trinette Reed/Stocksy, pg. 30; Aleksandra Jankovic/Stocksy, pg. 31; Trinette
Reed/Stocksy, pg. 33; Carine Lutt/Stockfood, pg. 38; Foodcollection/ Stockfood, pg. 39; Trinette
Reed/Stocksy, pg. 40; Trinette Reed/Stocksy, pg. 42; Bernard Radvaner/Media Bakery, pg. 43;
Helga Esteb/Shutterstock.com, pg. 44; Shannon Oslick, pg. 48-49; Shannon Oslick, pg. 50; Amy
Convington/Stocksy, pg. 56; Shannon Oslick, pg. 62; Shannon Oslick, pg. 94-95; Shannon
Oslick, pg. 96; Laura Adani/Stocksy, pg. 107; Shannon Oslick, pg. 122; Trinette Reed/Stocksy,
pg. 133; Trinette Reed/Stocksy, pg. 147; Shannon Oslick, pg. 148; Sara Remington/Stocksy, pg.
151; Shannon Oslick, pg. 164; Shannon Oslick, pg. 190; Kerry Murphy/Stocksy, pg. 251;
Shannon Oslick, pg. 252; Jill Chen/Stocksy, pg. 263; Shannon Oslick, pg. 274; Shannon Oslick,
pg. 286. All other photos iStock, Thinkstock, and Shutterstock.com.

Michael T. Murray, N.D. & Joseph E. Pizzorno, N.D.

From the bestselling authors of THE ENCYCLOPEDIA OF HEALING FOODS, the most comprehensive and practical guide available to the extraordinary healing powers of natural medicine

From two world-renowned naturopathic doctors comes the authoritative third edition of the classic
reference work, revised and expanded to include the latest cutting-edge natural therapies for the most common ailments. Michael Murray and Joseph Pizzorno focus on promoting health and treating disease with nontoxic, natural therapies, and this groundbreaking book—the leader in its field—shows you how to improve your health through a positive mental attitude, a healthy lifestyle, a health-promoting diet, and supplements, with plenty of practical tips.
With natural approaches for treating more than 80 common ailments, e Encyclopedia of Natural
Medicine will give you:
• Ways to prevent disease through enhancing key body systems
• The major causes and symptoms of each condition
• The therapeutic considerations you need to be aware of
• Detailed treatment summaries that include the most effective nutritional supplements and botanical medicines
• And much more
is text is a perfect introduction to the world of natural medicine, providing clear guidance in the use of the best natural remedies for all kinds of illnesses, big and small.

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Book Details
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 File Size 
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 File Type
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 ISBN
 978-1-4516-6301-3 (eBook) 
 Copyright©   
 1998, 2012
 by Joseph E. Pizzorno and Michael T. Murray

About the Authors
Author of more than thirty books, DR. MICHAEL T. MURRAY is regarded as one of the world’s top
authorities on natural medicine. An educator, lecturer, researcher, and health food industry consultant,
Murray also serves as the director of product development and education at Natural Factors, a major
producer of dietary supplements.

DR. JOSEPH PIZZORNO is a leader in the field of natural medicine and cofounder of Bastyr
University, the first ever accredited, multidisciplinary university of natural medicine in the United States (and the English-speaking world). He is an international lecturer and ongoing contributor to magazines such as Natural Health, Better Nutrition, and Let’s Live.....

PREFACE
This book was written in an effort to update the public’s knowledge about the use of natural
medicines in the maintenance of health and treatment of disease. It dispels a common myth about
the use of natural remedies—that natural medicine is “unscientific.” This book contains information
based on firm scientific inquiry and represents an evidence-based approach to wellness. This
encyclopedia is without question the most thoroughly researched and referenced book on the use of
natural medicines ever written for the public.

The book must not be used in place of consulting a physician or other qualified health care
practitioner. It is designed for use in conjunction with the services provided by physicians practicing
natural medicine. Readers are strongly urged to develop a good relationship with a physician
knowledgeable in the art and science of natural and preventive medicine, such as a naturopathic
physician. In all cases involving a medical complaint, ailment, or therapy, please consult a physician.
Proper medical care and advice can significantly improve the quality of your life and extend your life span.

Although this book discusses numerous natural approaches to various health conditions, it is not
intended as a substitute for appropriate medical care. Please keep the following in mind as you read:
• Do not self-diagnose. If you have concerns about any subject discussed in this book, please consult
a physician, preferably a naturopathic doctor (N.D.), nutritionally oriented medical doctor (M.D.)
or doctor of osteopathy (D.O.), chiropractor (D.C.), or other natural health care specialist.
• Make your physician aware of all the prescription medications, over-the-counter medications,
nutritional supplements, or herbal products you are currently taking, in order to avoid any negative
interactions.
• If you are currently taking a prescription medication, you absolutely must work with your doctor
before discontinuing any drug or altering any drug regimen.
• Many health conditions require a multifactorial solution: medical, nutritional, and lifestyle changes.
Do not rely solely on a single area of focus. You can’t just take pills and not change your diet, or do
the diet and the pills but ignore the lifestyle issues. Any truly effective approach to health must be
fully integrated.

We believe that if you commit to following the guidelines of natural health care described in this
book, you will be rewarded with a life full of health, vitality, and vigor.
Michael T. Murray, N.D.
Joseph E. Pizzorno, N.D.
....


Table of Contents
Acknowledgments
Preface
SECTION I
INTRODUCTION TO NATURAL MEDICINE
Chapter 1: What Is Natural Medicine?
Chapter 2: The Healing Power Within
SECTION II
THE FOUR CORNERSTONES OF GOOD HEALTH
Chapter 3: A Positive Mental Attitude
Chapter 4: A Health-Promoting Lifestyle
Chapter 5: A Health-Promoting Diet
Chapter 6: Supplementary Measures
SECTION III
SPECIAL TOPICS
Chapter 7: A Cellular Approach to Health
Chapter 8: Cancer Prevention
Chapter 9: Detoxification and Internal Cleansing
Chapter 10: Digestion and Elimination
Chapter 11: Heart and Cardiovascular Health
Chapter 12: Immune System Support
Chapter 13: Longevity and Life Extension
Chapter 14: Silent Inflammation
Chapter 15: Stress Management
Chapter 16: Obesity and Weight Management
SECTION IV
SPECIFIC HEALTH PROBLEMS
Chapter 17: Acne
Chapter 18: Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and HIV Infection
Chapter 19: Alcohol Dependence
Chapter 20: Alzheimer’s Disease
Chapter 21: Anemia
Chapter 22: Angina
Chapter 23: Anxiety
Chapter 24: Asthma
Chapter 25: Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder
Chapter 26: Autism Spectrum Disorder
Chapter 27: Boils
Chapter 28: Breast Cancer (Prevention)
Chapter 29: Bronchitis and Pneumonia
Chapter 30: Candidiasis, Chronic
Chapter 31: Canker Sores
Chapter 32: Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
Chapter 33: Cataracts
Chapter 34: Celiac Disease
Chapter 35: Cerebral Vascular Insufficiency
Chapter 36: Cervical Dysplasia
Chapter 37: Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
Chapter 38: Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Chapter 39: Common Cold
Chapter 40: Congestive Heart Failure
Chapter 41: Constipation
Chapter 42: Crohn’s Disease and Ulcerative Colitis (Inflammatory Bowel Disease)
Chapter 43: Cystitis and Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder
Chapter 44: Depression
Chapter 45: Diabetes
Chapter 46: Diarrhea
Chapter 47: Ear Infection (Otitis Media)
Chapter 48: Endometriosis
Chapter 49: Erectile Dysfunction
Chapter 50: Eczema (Atopic Dermatitis)
Chapter 51: Fibrocystic Breast Disease
Chapter 52: Food Allergy
Chapter 53: Gallstones
Chapter 54: Glaucoma
Chapter 55: Gout
Chapter 56: Hair Loss in Women
Chapter 57: Hay Fever
Chapter 58: Headache, Nonmigraine
Chapter 59: Heart Arrhythmias
Chapter 60: Hemorrhoids
Chapter 61: Hepatitis
Chapter 62: Herpes
Chapter 63: High Blood Pressure
Chapter 64: High Cholesterol and/or Triglycerides
Chapter 65: Hives (Urticaria)
Chapter 66: Hyperthyroidism
Chapter 67: Hypoglycemia
Chapter 68: Hypothyroidism
Chapter 69: Infertility (Female)
Chapter 70: Infertility (Male)
Chapter 71: Insomnia
Chapter 72: Irritable Bowel Syndrome
Chapter 73: Kidney Stones
Chapter 74: Macular Degeneration
Chapter 75: Menopause
Chapter 76: Menstrual Blood Loss, Excessive (Menorrhagia)
Chapter 77: Migraine Headache
Chapter 78: Multiple Sclerosis
Chapter 79: Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD)/Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH)
Chapter 80: Osteoarthritis
Chapter 81: Osteoporosis
Chapter 82: Parkinson’s Disease
Chapter 83: Peptic Ulcer
Chapter 84: Periodontal Disease
Chapter 85: Premenstrual Syndrome
Chapter 86: Prostate Cancer (Prevention)
Chapter 87: Prostate Enlargement (BPH)
Chapter 88: Psoriasis
Chapter 89: Rheumatoid Arthritis
Chapter 90: Rosacea
Chapter 91: Seborrheic Dermatitis
Chapter 92: Sinus Infections
Chapter 93: Sports Injuries, Tendinitis, and Bursitis
Chapter 94: Strep Throat (Streptococcal Pharyngitis)
Chapter 95: Stroke (Recovery From)
Chapter 96: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
Chapter 97: Uterine Fibroids
Chapter 98: Vaginitis
Chapter 99: Varicose Veins
Glossary
Appendix A: Are You an Optimist?
Appendix B: Glycemic Index, Carbohydrate Content, and Glycemic Load of Selected Foods
Appendix C: Acid-Base Values of Selected Foods
References
Index


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- a practical guide to the healing properties of herbs -

Penelope Ody


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 eISBN
 978–1-5107–1157–0
 Copyright©   
 2017 by Penelope Ody
 Text © 1993, 2000, 2015 Penelope Ody

CONSULTING AN HERBALIST
While many people use herbs as safe and effective home remedies for minor
ailments, persistent or more serious problems need professional help. Finding a
practitioner with whom you feel empathy and can trust can be just as important
in treatment as taking the right herbs. Some herbalists follow a semi-orthodox
path prescribing remedies to ease symptoms, while others will focus on holistic
treatments and urge major lifestyle changes. Some will use only Western herbs,
others a combination of Chinese or Ayurvedic remedies. Some will talk mainly
of pathological conditions, others will suggest qi stagnation, allergies, or focus
on emotional stress.
If possible, choose your practitioner by personal recommendation from likeminded
friends to ensure a good relationship with someone who understands
your problem and whom you can also understand. Alternatively, ask the national
regulatory body for a list of members and speak to likely practitioners before
making an appointment: ask about their experience of treating ailments similar
to yours and their general therapeutic approach. A wide range of ailments are
commonly treated: both the sort of problems one may normally take to a GP –
infections, aches and pains, menstrual disorders, high blood pressure, urinary
dysfunction, or digestive problems – as well as those chronic conditions for
which herbalism is often seen as a “last resort,” such as rheumatoid arthritis,
ME, or emphysema.

WHO ARE THE HERBALISTS?
National practices and regulations vary around the world. In the UK, the national
Institute of Medical Herbalists was founded in 1864, and is the oldest
professional body of medical herbalists in the world. Students must complete
several years’ training, which today includes a degree course in herbal medicine
at an accredited institution plus 500 hours of supervised clinical training, before
being accepted into membership. Members use the initials MNIMH or FNIMH
after their names, which gives the patient some guarantee that they are
consulting a suitably trained practitioner. In the U.S., the American Herbalists
Guild was started by well-known herbalist Michael Tierra in 1989. As with the
NIMH, there are strict criteria for membership, which includes four years of
academic training and 400 hours of clinical experience. Practitioners generally
use RH(AHG) (registered herbalist AHG)” after their names. The AHG website
provides details of the many colleges in the U.S. that offer herb courses and their
graduates’ qualifications, so finding out about the nature of your chosen
practitioner’s training can be straightforward.
practitioner’s training can be straightforward.
Other national practices can vary considerably: in France, herbal practitioners,
or phytothérapeute, are almost always trained doctors who have studied plant
medicine at the post-graduate level; in Germany, alternative practitioners qualify
as “heilpraktiker” and have comparable status to orthodox GPs while in many
Eastern European medical schools “materia medica,” the study of herbal
remedies, remains an important part of the student curriculum. In Australia,
trained herbalists become full members of the National Herbalists Association
and use the initials NHAA after their names. They are officially classed as
Health Care Professionals by the Commonwealth Government.
In China, traditional herbal medicine is taught in dedicated colleges and is
available to patients at special hospitals as an alternative to Western medicine,
while in Japan, herbal remedies are available on their equivalent of the National
Health Service. In other countries, including some US states, it is illegal for
anyone to prescribe herbal remedies or set themselves up as a herbal practitioner,
although self-medication with herbs is permitted. In others, just about anyone,
well-trained or not, can set up in business as a medical herbalist and dispense all
manner of inappropriate “cures.”

WHAT DOES AN HERBALIST DO?
During a consultation, an herbalist will use patient listening and probing
questions to uncover all the relevant symptoms along with time-honored
diagnostic techniques: feeling pulses, looking at tongues, testing urine and blood
pressure with clinical examinations dependent on palpation, auscultation, and
percussion. A first consultation will generally take at least an hour and
subsequent ones 20 minutes or so. As well as reviewing the current illness, the
herbalist will ask about medical history – previous health problems that may be
contributing to the current imbalance, family tendencies and allergies, diet,
lifestyle, stresses, and worries.
Existing orthodox medication also needs to be checked. Herbalists would
certainly not recommend dropping vital drugs, but any incompatibility of these
with herbal remedies obviously needs to be considered when prescribing plant
medicines. Similarly, many patients turn to herbs because they are anxious to
phase-out their drugs, for whatever reason, and a safe program of replacing them
with gentler herbal remedies needs to be devised – preferably with the support
and co-operation of the patient’s GP.
Many herbalists still dispense their own remedies so at the end of the
consultation the patient may leave with an assortment of appropriate tinctures,
ointments, or capsules – or perhaps a bag of dried herbs to brew at home.
Whatever the remedy, it will have been specially selected to help the health
Whatever the remedy, it will have been specially selected to help the health
problems of the individual patient rather than be just a standard selection of
ready-made products.
Herbalists like to see patients fairly soon after the first consultation to check
on progress – perhaps after two or three weeks – with regular meetings every
four to six weeks for three months or more in chronic cases. Herbal medication
is likely to be altered slightly after each consultation to reflect changes in the
condition. Just as all patients are different, so too are all herbalists; healing is a
two-way process, and the patient must take responsibility for their own health
and actively participate in any cure.
....

Introduction
One of the earliest Chinese herbals – Shen Nong’s Materia Medica, dating
from the first or second century AD – lists 365 healing remedies, most of
them plants but including a few mineral and animal extracts. The Greek
physician Dioscorides, writing in the first century AD, mentioned about 400
herbs. Today, the list of plants with known medicinal properties is much
longer: around 5,800 in the Chinese Materia Medica, 2,500 known in India,
at least 800 regularly collected from the tropical forests of Africa, almost
300 currently detailed for the medical profession in Germany (one of the
few Western countries with official herbal monographs), and many
thousands more known only to traditional healers in the more remote
corners of our world. To produce a truly complete medicinal herbal would
fill many volumes and be the work of several lifetimes. Yet, despite this
bewildering array of healing plants, the average Western herbalist generally
finds that a working knowledge of 150 to 200 plants is more than enough to
cope with most human ailments.

Herbs may be defined as any plant that can be put to culinary or
medicinal use and include those we associate with conventional drugs, such
as foxglove and opium poppy, as well as everyday plants, such as garlic or
sage. The herbs in this book are a representative cross section of these
potent plants, ranging from exotic Eastern herbs, such as ma huang and
ginseng, to more mundane apples and cabbages.

Interest in herbal remedies has grown steadily in the past decades. In the
years since 1993, when the first edition of this book appeared, there has
been a significant increase in sales of ready-made herbal remedies and more
interest from the conventional medical profession in using herbal extracts as
an alternative to powerful and potentially hazardous drugs. That interest has
been fueled by concerns over the growing number of antibiotic-resistant
micro-organisms that conventional treatments find increasingly difficult to
tackle. In the West, people often cite the risk of side effects from powerful
conventional drugs as a reason for turning to gentler, plant medicines. In the
developing world, a lack of hard currency to pay for pharmaceutical imports
is encouraging a reappraisal of traditional folk remedies.

This trend towards more natural medicines has gained added impetus
from our growing concern with environmental issues, such as the
destruction of rain forests and the loss of rare species. Although the
destruction of rain forests and the loss of rare species. Although the
therapeutic effects of many herbs have not been scientifically proven,
research continues to identify the active ingredients that may one day form
the basis of drugs to fight cancer or AIDS.

And yet, in extracting these chemicals and seeking to turn herbal
remedies designed to help the body heal itself into powerful drugs to
obliterate symptoms, we forget one of the basic tenets of traditional healing:
a belief that the cause of disharmonies and “disease” should be treated
rather than the effects. We forget, too, that traditional health care has as
much to do with preventing disease as with curing it.

The use of simple herbal remedies can encourage us once again to take
responsibility for our own health. Instead of trying to obliterate symptoms
when they become severe, we need to be sufficiently in tune with our bodies
to recognize those symptoms as they develop and treat likely causes,
whether physical, emotional, or spiritual, to restore balance.

In this book I do not simply aim to give a wealth of detail about a limited
number of plants or provide cure-all lists of remedies that can be taken to
alleviate symptoms. I have tried instead to look at how some herbs have
been used by the traditional healers of many cultures and I have suggested a
therapeutic approach for ailments that focuses on healing the whole person.
For some, these suggestions may represent an effective solution. For others,
they will only be the starting point for a wider exploration of the healing
power of herbs.
....


Table of Contents
INTRODUCTION
HERBS PAST & PRESENT
Origins of Western Herbalism
A Science of Life
Chinese Herbal Medicine
Out of the Dark Ages
North American Traditions
From Plants to Pills
Medicinal Meals
A–Z OF MEDICINAL HERBS
Arranged by Latin name, a visual directory of more than 100 herbs
Ayurvedic Herbs
Bush Herbs
Fungi
South American Herbs
HERBAL REMEDIES
Harvesting & Drying Herbs
Making Herbal Remedies
Other Herbal Remedies
Herbal First Aid
HOME REMEDIES
Aches & Pains
Headaches & Migraines
Infections
Respiratory Problems
Ears, Eyes, Mouth & Throat
Skin & Hair
Heart, Blood & Circulation
Digestive Problems
Allergic Conditions
Urinary Disorders
Nervous Disorders
Gynecological Problems
Pregnancy & Childbirth
Male Reproductive Problems
Problems of the Elderly
Endocrine & Glandular Problems
Children’s Complaints
Ayurvedic Tonics
Chinese Tonics
Qi Tonics
Blood Tonics
Yang Tonics
Yin Tonics
Western Tonics
Energy Tonics
Nerve Tonics
Mind Tonics
OTHER MEDICINAL HERBS
CONSULTING AN HERBALIST
GLOSSARY
INDEX


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Visit our website at www.skyhorsepublishing.com.

 Cover design by Rain Saukas Cover photographs: iStockphoto.com
Interior images: iStockphoto.com except as follows: p. 60, Harpagophytum procumbens: H. Zell p. 63,
Hypericum perforatum: courtesy of Penelope Ody p. 81, Nardostachys grandiflora: Joseph Dalton Hooker
p. 126, Withania Somnifera: Wowbobwow12

- 150 Herbal Remedies to Heal Common Ailments -

Anne Kennedy


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 eBook 978-1-62315-750-0 
 Copyright©   
 2017 by Althea Press,
 Berkeley, California

Resources
■ Popular Brands
When you start shopping for convenient herbal remedies, such as
premade tinctures and capsules, you’ll notice that there are many
brands available. Here is a short list of some of the most popular,
reliable ones. Conduct research before purchasing supplements from a
brand you don’t recognize, and be suspicious if prices for prepared
products seem too low. Unscrupulous manufacturers often cut corners and use fillers.
Carlson Labs Dr. Mercola Gaia Herbs Herb Pharm Irwin Naturals Kirkland
Mountain Rose Herbs Natrol Nature Made New Chapter Nordic Naturals
NOW Foods Puritan’s Pride Rainbow Light Nutritional Systems Schiff
Trader Darwin’s

■ Books
Visit your local bookstore or library, and you’ll probably find plenty
of informative books that can help you deepen your knowledge of
herbal medicine. Here are five to consider: The Complete Medicinal
Herbal by Penelope Ody Prescription for Herbal Healing by Phyllis
A. Balch and Stacy Bell Encyclopedia of Herbal Medicine by Andrew
Chevallier The Herbal Apothecary by J. J. Pursell Rosemary
Gladstar’s Medicinal Herbs by Rosemary Gladstar

Websites
You can find many excellent sources for bulk herbs and supplies
online. Here is a list of some of the most popular, best-stocked sites.
Bulk Apothecary www.bulkapothecary.com
Jean’s Greens www.jeansgreens.com
Living Earth Herbs www.livingearthherbs.com
Mountain Rose Herbs www.mountainroseherbs.com
Pacific Botanicals www.pacificbotanicals.com
Starwest Botanicals www.starwest-botanicals.com

Continuing Education
There are many ways to expand your knowledge of medicinal herbs
and their uses for natural healing. For example, you can probably find
a local wildcrafting class by conducting a quick online search.
If formal education is your goal, then you can seek out a local
herbal medicine program to gain a wealth of practical information by
learning in person. In the event that you don’t have access to an herbal
medicine program, or would prefer to take online courses or conduct
your own research, you’ll find this list of resources helpful.
HerbMed—This electronic database includes a public site with evidencebased
information about 20 of the most common herbs. A subscription to
HerbMed Pro provides access to a database of information on 255 herbs.
You can choose an inexpensive pay-per-day option if you prefer.
National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health: Herbs at a
Glance—An extensive site with free downloadable fact sheets and an ebook,
this resource provides common names, scientific information, precautions,
and additional resources for learning about more than 50 popular herbs.
American Herbalists Guild—This site provides an impressive menu of
offerings. Free professional herbalist training webinars are a good place to
Learning Herbs—This user-friendly site provides an ample amount of free
information, plus some paid content including HerbMentor, a community
filled with articles, herbalism courses, reference materials, video tutorials,
Vermont Center for Integrative Herbalism—Classes, training programs,
and a library of resources, including informative articles, are just some of the
offerings you’ll find here.
....

Introduction
Herbal medicine has been used for thousands of years; in fact, its
history goes back much further than that of today’s pharmaceuticals.
It is a major component of alternative medicine, and is useful in
preventing and treating a number of common ailments.
Nature’s pharmacy is extensive, filled with herbs that possess
powerful medicinal properties. With guidance and knowledge,
everyone has the ability to use herbs to ease discomfort and promote healing.
Growing up in the mountains of Montana, I would hear stories
about how Native Americans healed all kinds of illnesses using
remedies made with some of the wild plants that grew just outside our
family’s door. It wasn’t until adulthood, though, that I began to
experiment with anything beyond the simplest peppermint and
chamomile teas. Today I delight in growing an abundance of fragrant
herbs in my garden and in the hardwood forest behind my home. I
take great pleasure in walking through the woods and along
riverbanks, spotting plants with medicinal properties, and marveling at
their beauty and efficacy while breathing in their fragrances. On those
rare occasions when I’m not feeling well, I am often able to take care
of myself by using plants I’ve harvested and prepared.
Some herbal remedies involve using plant parts in their fresh,
natural state. Others call for store-bought extracts, and still others for
compounds made in the comfort of your own kitchen. By conducting
a bit of research, ensuring that a specific herb is right and safe for me,
and following any applicable precautions, I’ve been able to easily take
charge of my own health and treat minor ailments before they worsen
and require medical intervention. Now you can, too.
While it was once difficult to buy medicinal herbs, it is now very
easy to find the most popular ones at well-stocked pharmacies and
even on the shelves of big-box stores. Health food stores offer an
extensive selection of whole herbs, along with tinctures, teas,
ointments, and other products that make it easy to skip pharmaceuticals.

It may come as a surprise to learn that a number of conventional
pharmaceuticals have their roots firmly planted in herbal medicine.
Aspirin comes from willow bark, and morphine is carefully
compounded from opium poppies. Quinine, a vital drug for the
treatment of malaria, comes from the bark of the cinchona tree, and
digoxin, a potent drug used in cardiac cases, comes from the beautiful
but poisonous foxglove. Many other pharmaceuticals are plant based
or are synthesized using compounds that are identical to those found in nature.

Still, mainstream medicine prefers synthetic drugs for their
standardization, purity, and ease of use. Understandably, prescription
pharmaceuticals have earned a coveted status. It is not the intent of
this book to downplay their importance. However, it’s equally
important to remember that in the United States, herbs are considered
to be dietary supplements, and when sold commercially, they’re
regulated as such. Therefore, when you make the decision to treat an
ailment the natural way, you don’t need to obtain a prescription—as
you would with a synthetic drug—to use an herbal poultice, apply a
simple cream or oil, or take a tincture or tea.

While herbs are powerful, most do not have the lingering side
effects that often accompany drugs. They do not inhibit the body’s
natural healing process; instead, they boost our ability to recover,
particularly when paired with rest. Many herbs help boost the immune
system, too, making it easier for the body to use its natural defenses
against viruses and infections.
Cataloguing the world’s medicinal plants would take an immense
effort, and, even then, it would be nearly impossible to cover all the
properties offered by each and every plant. While there are many
wonderful and extensive guides detailing hundreds of herbs, it can be
difficult to decide what to use—especially when there are so many
options available.

This book is different. Within these pages, you’ll find a guide to
using some of the world’s most common and effective medicinal
herbs. All of them are easy to find online or at your local health food
store. It’s also quite likely that you can find some of them growing
within a short distance of your front door. A few may even be hiding
inside your spice cabinet! Whether you are new to the world of herbal
medicine or have already begun experiencing the healing power of
plants, you’ll find this book useful. The main section of the book
covers 75 common ailments, along with treatments for each. The final
chapter features profiles of 40 herbs, including important precautions
and notes for identifying and even growing them if you like.
....


Table of Contents
Introduction
CHAPTER 1
Taking the Old and Making It New
CHAPTER 2
The Herbal Kitchen
CHAPTER 3
Remedies and Recipes
Abscess
Fresh Yarrow Poultice
Echinacea and Goldenseal Tincture
Acne
Calendula Toner
Agrimony-Chamomile Gel
Allergies
Feverfew-Peppermint Tincture
Garlic-Ginkgo Syrup
Asthma
Ginkgo-Thyme Tea
Peppermint-Rosemary Vapor Treatment
Athlete’s Foot
Fresh Garlic Poultice
Goldenseal Ointment
Backache
Passionflower–Blue Vervain Tea
Ginger-Peppermint Salve
Bee Sting
Fresh Plantain Poultice
Comfrey-Aloe Gel
Bloating
Peppermint-Fennel Tea
Dandelion Root Tincture
Bronchitis
Rosemary–Licorice Root Vapor Treatment
Goldenseal-Hyssop Syrup
Bruise
Fresh Hyssop Poultice
Arnica Salve
Burn
Chickweed-Mullein Compress
Fresh Aloe Vera Gel
Canker Sore
Calendula-Comfrey Poultice
Goldenseal Tincture
Chapped Lips
Aloe-Calendula Balm
Comfrey-Hyssop Lip Balm
Chest Congestion
Hyssop-Sage Infusion
Angelica-Goldenseal Syrup
Chicken Pox
Comfrey-Licorice Bath
Calendula-Goldenseal Gel
Cold
Thyme Tea
Herbal Cold Syrup with Comfrey, Mullein, and Raspberry Leaf
Cold Sore
Garlic Poultice
Echinacea-Sage Toner
Colic
Chamomile Infusion
Herbal Gripe Water with Fennel, Ginger, and Peppermint
Conjunctivitis
Quick Chamomile Poultice
Goldenseal Poultice
Constipation
Aloe Vera Juice
Dandelion-Chickweed Syrup
Cough
Fennel-Hyssop Tea
Licorice-Thyme Cough Syrup
Cuts and Scrapes
Fresh Comfrey Poultice
Plantain Salve
Dandruff
Echinacea Spray
Rosemary Conditioner
Diaper Rash
Chamomile-Echinacea Gel
Comfrey-Thyme Salve
Diarrhea
Agrimony Tea
Catnip–Raspberry Leaf Decoction
Dry Skin
Chickweed-Aloe Gel
Calendula-Comfrey Body Butter
Earache
Blue Vervain Infusion and Poultice
Garlic-Mullein Infused Oil
Eczema
Calendula-Goldenseal Spray
Comfrey Salve
Fatigue
Feverfew Tincture
Licorice-Rosemary Syrup
Fever
Feverfew Syrup
Blue Vervain–Raspberry Leaf Tincture
Flatulence
Peppermint–Angelica Tea
Fresh Ginger–Fennel Decoction
Flu
Catnip-Hyssop Tea
Garlic, Echinacea, and Goldenseal Syrup
Gingivitis
Calendula-Chamomile Mouth Rinse
Goldenseal-Sage Oil Pull
Hair Loss
Ginger Scalp Treatment
Ginkgo-Rosemary Tonic
Halitosis
Peppermint-Sage Mouthwash
Ginger-Mint Gunpowder Green Tea
Hangover
Feverfew-Hops Tea
Milk Thistle Tincture
Headache
Blue Vervain–Catnip Tea
Skullcap Tincture
Heartburn
Fresh Ginger Tea
Fennel-Angelica Syrup
Hemorrhoids
Calendula–Witch Hazel Spray
Chickweed-Goldenseal Ointment with St. John’s Wort
High Blood Pressure
Angelica Infusion
Dandelion-Lavender Tincture
Hives
Licorice-Chamomile Spray
Rosemary-Comfrey Salve
Indigestion
Chamomile-Angelica Tea
Ginger Syrup
Insect Bites
Fresh Basil-Mullein Salve
Peppermint-Plantain Balm
Insomnia
Valerian Tea with Hops and Passionflower
Chamomile-Catnip Syrup
Jock Itch
Infused Garlic Oil
Calendula, Chamomile, and Goldenseal Spray
Keratosis Pilaris
Chickweed Scrub
Calendula-Chamomile Body Butter
Laryngitis
Mullein-Sage Tea
Ginger Gargle
Menopause
Fennel-Sage Decoction
Black Cohosh Tincture
Mental Focus
Ginseng-Rosemary Tea
Ginkgo Biloba Tincture
Mental Wellness
St. John’s Wort Tea
Chamomile-Passionflower Decoction
Muscle Cramps
Rosemary Liniment
Ginger Salve
Nausea
Peppermint Decoction
Chamomile-Ginger Tea
Oily Skin
Rosemary Toner
Peppermint Scrub
Poison Ivy
Herbal Spray with Calendula, Chickweed, Chamomile, and Comfrey
Licorice Root Powder
Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS)
Dandelion-Ginger Tea
Black Cohosh Syrup
Prostatitis
Hops Tea
Turmeric–Saw Palmetto Tincture
Psoriasis
Licorice Root Spray
Goldenseal, Chamomile, and Comfrey Salve
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Blue Vervain–Comfrey Liniment
Ginger-Licorice Salve
Ringworm
Fresh Garlic Compress
Goldenseal Balm
Rosacea
Chamomile-Aloe Scrub
Licorice-Feverfew Mask
Shingles
Licorice Salve
Goldenseal-Comfrey Spray
Sinus Infection
Horseradish Shot
Peppermint-Echinacea Tea
Skin Tag
Ginger Poultice
Fresh Dandelion Sap
Sore Muscles
Ginger-Fennel Massage Oil
Peppermint–St. John’s Wort Salve
Sore Throat
Peppermint Tea with Comfrey and Sage
Agrimony-Licorice Gargle
Sprain
Arnica Gel
Comfrey-Ginger Balm and Compress
Stiff Joints
Peppermint-Comfrey Massage Oil
Horseradish Salve
Sunburn
Comfrey Spray
Hyssop-Infused Aloe Vera Gel
Tendinitis
Ginger-Turmeric Tea
Peppermint Salve
Travel Sickness
Chamomile Syrup
Candied Ginger
Urinary Tract Infection (UTI)
Horseradish Tea
Dandelion Tincture
Warts
Fresh Basil Compress
Garlic Oil
Weight Loss
Dieter’s Tea Blend with Chickweed, Dandelion, and Fennel
Ginseng Tincture
Wrinkles
Calendula Toner
Aloe Gel Facial
Yeast Infection
Garlic Suppository
Chamomile-Calendula Douche with Echinacea
CHAPTER 4
Herbs to Know
Agrimony
Aloe
Angelica
Arnica
Basil
Black cohosh
Blue vervain
Catnip
Chamomile
Chickweed
Comfrey
Dandelion
Echinacea
Fennel
Feverfew
Garlic
Ginger
Ginkgo biloba
Ginseng
Goldenseal
Hops
Horseradish
Hyssop
Licorice
Milk thistle
Mullein
Passionflower
Peppermint
Plantain
Raspberry
Rosemary
Sage
Saw palmetto
Skullcap
St. John’s wort
Thyme
Turmeric
Valerian
Witch hazel
Yarrow
Appendix
Glossary
Resources
Ailments and Remedies Quick Reference Guide
References


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Cover photograph © Shannon Douglas; Interior photography: © Stocksy/Trinette Reed, ; © Stocksy/Vera Lair, ; © Pixel Stories, ; © Stocksy/Trinette Reed, © here; Stocksy/Alicia Bock, © ; Stocksy/Natasa Kukic, here

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