Showing posts with label Google. Show all posts

A Step-by-Step Guide to Using Three Online Services to Make One Successful Business

Peter Kent . Jill K. Finlayson


e-books shop
e-books shop
Purchase Now !
Just with Paypal



Book Details
 Price
 2.50
 Pages
 408 p
 File Size 
 12,366 KB
 File Type
 PDF format
 ISBN
 0-07-226444-6
 Copyright©   
 2006 by
 The McGraw-Hill Companies 

About the Authors
Peter Kent is the author of more books about the Internet than any other writer. His titles include
Search Engine Optimization for Dummies, the bestselling Complete Idiot’s Guide to the Internet,
and the most widely reviewed and praised title in computer-book history, Poor Richard’s Web
Site: Geek Free, Commonsense Advice on Building a Low-Cost Web Site. In all, he is the author
of around 50 books and hundreds of newspaper and magazine articles.
Kent has worked in e-commerce and online marketing for over a decade. He set up his first
web-based store in 1997, and in 1999 he founded an e-Business Service Provider funded by
one of the world’s largest VC firms. Kent currently consults with businesses about their Internet
marketing strategies, helping them to avoid the pitfalls and to leap the hurdles they’ll encounter
online. For more information, visit http://www.PeterKentConsulting.com/.

Jill K. Finlayson is one of the founders of M Networks, a media company that provides training
seminars, books, and distance learning on online retailing, in addition to hosting the Small eBusiness
World Conference and Expo designed for small business owners and entrepreneurs. Finlayson
worked at eBay from 1998 to 2003 as Senior Category Manager in charge of the Toys, Dolls,
Hobbies, and Crafts businesses, a segment that generates more than $1.5 billion in transactions
annually. Finlayson is co-author of Fundraising on eBay (McGraw-Hill), and she writes much of the
curriculum and training materials for eKnowledge Institute’s Academy and Business School courses
in eBay. Finlayson also worked for The Learning Company, an educational software company. She
lives in Fremont, California, and is a graduate of the University of California at Berkeley.

Table of Contents
Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxi
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxiii
PART I Building an eBay Business
CHAPTER 1 How Your Business Fits Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Why Three Services? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
What Makes a Good Online Product? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
The Perfect Online Product . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Understanding the Price Sensitivity of the Online Buyer . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
To Ship or Not to Ship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
CHAPTER 2 Creating Your eBay Presence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Why Sell Through eBay? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Registering as an eBay Member . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Setting Up a PayPal Account . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Using My eBay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Creating an About Me Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Using ID Verify . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Getting Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
CHAPTER 3 Preparing to Sell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Learning How to Buy on eBay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Understanding the Selling Formats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Using Buy It Now—BIN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Different Quantity Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
eBay Fees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Selling Strategies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Timing Strategies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Setting Your Preferences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
CHAPTER 4 Planning Your Shipping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
The Internet Shipping Revolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Picking Packing Materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Packaging “Best Practices” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Who Will You Ship With? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Estimating Shipping Costs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Calculating a Packaging and Handling Fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Considering “Shipping Strategies” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Shipping Overseas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
CHAPTER 5 Listing Your Items Effectively . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Creating Your Photographs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Taking Great Photographs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
The Selling Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Choosing a Selling Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Selecting a Listing Category . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Creating a Title and Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Entering Pricing Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Specifying When the Item Will Sell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Specifying Item Quantity and Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Adding Photographs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Hosting Your Own Pictures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Specifying the Listing Layout and Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Providing Payment, Shipping, and Returns Details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
Entering Your Shipping Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
Reviewing and Submitting Your Listing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
CHAPTER 6 Monitoring, Modifying, and Managing Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Checking on Your Listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Changing a Listing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Canceling and Rescheduling Listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Reviewing the Auction Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Canceling a Member’s Bid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Blocking Bidders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
CHAPTER 7 Payment, Shipping, and Feedback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Viewing Your Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Completing a Sale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Calculating the Final Charge and Asking for Payment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Receiving Payment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Shipping the Product and Sending a Notification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Leaving Feedback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Handling Nonpaying Bidders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Using the Unpaid Item Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Relisting the Item . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Doing a Second Chance Sale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
CHAPTER 8 Automating and Scaling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
The Different eBay Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Using Turbo Lister . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Using Selling Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
Using Seller’s Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Using Third-party Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
More Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
CHAPTER 9 Opening an eBay Store . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
Why Set Up an eBay Store? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
Pushing People to Your Store . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
Selecting a Store Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
eBay Store Fees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
Monthly Fees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
Listing Upgrade Fees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
Final Value Fees—Sales Originating Through eBay . . . . . . . . . . 111
Final Value Fees—Sales Originating Through Your
Own Efforts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
Setting Up Your Store . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
Customizing Your Store . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Listing Your Items for Sale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
CHAPTER 10 Marketing, Keywords, and Promotions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
Using eBay Keywords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
Using Store Promotion Boxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
Setting Up Cross Promotions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
Using eBay’s E-mail Marketing Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
Looking for Ways to Differentiate Your Listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
Using Your Store to Build Relationships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
Selling Wholesale Lots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
CHAPTER 11 Power Selling, Consignment Selling, and Analyzing
Your Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
Becoming a PowerSeller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
The Five PowerSeller Levels and Their Benefits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
Reviewing Your Sales Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
Consignment Selling and Becoming a Trading Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
Becoming a Trading Post . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
Building Your Trading Assistant Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
PART II Building Your Yahoo! Store
CHAPTER 12 Getting Started with Yahoo! Merchant Solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
Choosing a Merchant Solutions Package . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
Do You Need a Web Site, Too? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
Deciding How to Build Your Store Pages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
Making Your Decision . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145
Poor Man’s Site Integration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146
And the Choice Is . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146
Picking a Domain Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146
Registering for a Yahoo! Merchant Solutions Account . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
Pointing Your Domain to Your Store . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
Pointing www to the Store . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
Finding Your Way Around the Store Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
Creating a Store Security Key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
Setting Up a Credit Card Merchant Account . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152
CHAPTER 13 Adding and Importing Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
Understanding the Product Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
Adding an Item to the Product Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
Working with Options—Monograms, Inscriptions,
Incremental Pricing, and More . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159
Modifying Items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161
Publishing Your Product Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162
Viewing the Data in Your Store . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162
Exporting Product Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
Importing Product Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164
Dealing with Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
Creating Section Pages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
Entering Inventory Quantities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168
Creating and Importing the Data File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168
Publishing Your Import Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170
Importing Images . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171
CHAPTER 14 Working in Store Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
Moving Around in Store Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
Understanding Your Store Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176
Using the Contents Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178
Learning the Edit Toolbar Buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
Planning Your Strategy—to HTML or Not to HTML? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
CHAPTER 15 Creating the Home and Section Pages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189
Setting Up the Home Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189
Using HTML in the Message and Other Text Fields . . . . . . . . . . 193
Moving and Removing Elements on the Home Page . . . . . . . . . 194
Making a Product or Section a “Special” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195
Creating and Editing Section Pages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197
Working with Images and HTML . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
Placing Other Products on a Section Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202
Moving Products Between Sections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204
CHAPTER 16 Modifying Page Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 205
Modifying the Section Page’s Head and Contents Layout . . . . . . . . . . . 205
Choosing Product Layout with Contents-format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207
Picking Product Elements with Contents-elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208
Overriding Head and Contents Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208
Using Leaf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209
Overriding Contents Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209
Placing Products on the Section Page Only . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211
Creating and Editing Product Pages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 212
Creating a “Link” Information Blurb . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213
Creating a Product Accessory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214
Associating One Product with Another . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
Modifying Product Page Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216
CHAPTER 17 Customizing the Site Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
Modifying the Store’s Graphic Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
Quickly Selecting a Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218
Modifying the Navbar Buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218
Switching to a Horizontal Button Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218
Adding, Removing, and Moving Buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219
Changing the Order of the Contents Buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221
Changing Button Designs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221
Changing Button Labels and Using Images . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 222
Changing the Function of the Y! Shopping Button . . . . . . . . . . . 222
Adding More Buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223
Using the Design Variables Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223
Adding Ancillary Pages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 228
Creating a Feedback or Catalog-request Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229
Creating More Pages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 230
Publishing Your Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 230
CHAPTER 18 Defining Payment Methods and Your Checkout Process . . . . . . . . . 231
Setting Up a Credit-card Merchant Account . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 231
Credit-card Transactions Explained . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 231
Already Got a Merchant Account? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 232
Merchant Account Fees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 233
Setting Up Credit-card Transactions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 234
Configuring Credit-card Verification (Risk) Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 235
Understanding Address Verification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 236
Understanding Card Verification Value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237
Selecting Risk Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237
Selecting Payment Methods: Credit Cards, PayPal, and More . . . . . . . . 238
Setting Up Your Order Forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 238
Setting Up Notification and Feedback Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 241
CHAPTER 19 Configuring Shipping, Taxes, and Inventory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 243
Specifying Where You Ship—Foreign Orders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 243
Setting Up Shipping Methods and Rates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 244
Using UPS OnLineTM Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 244
Creating Shipping Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245
Defining Shipping Rates and Creating Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 246
Configuring Shipping Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250
Defining Shipping Confirmation Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251
Managing Sales Tax Rates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251
Setting Up Sales Tax in Merchant Solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253
Using the Shipping & Tax Test Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 256
Configuring Inventory Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 256
Configuring Database Inventory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 257
Entering Inventory Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 259
Opening for Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 259
CHAPTER 20 Processing Orders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 261
Reviewing Your Orders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 261
Checking Flagged Orders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265
Processing Credit-card Payments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 267
Modifying Charges and Canceling Orders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 268
Processing Fax, Phone, and Mail Orders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 268
Processing PayPal and Other Forms of Payment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 269
Shipping Your Order . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 270
Shipping via UPS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 270
Blocking Fraudulent Orders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 271
CHAPTER 21 Promotion Strategies and Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 273
Submitting Data to Yahoo! Shopping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 273
Preparing Product Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 274
Adding Data Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 276
Categorizing Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 276
Creating the Product-url Field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 277
Importing and Publishing Your Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 277
Using Coupons and Discounts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 278
Creating Affiliate, Discount, and Tracking Links . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 279
Using E-mail Marketing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 282
Setting Up Cross-sell Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 282
PART III Using Google Pay Per Click and More to Grow Traffic
CHAPTER 22 Google AdWords and Other Pay Per Click Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . 289
What Is PPC? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 289
The PPC Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 291
Understanding the PPC Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 291
Understanding Conversion Ratio, Click Value, and ROI . . . . . . . . . . . . 292
Calculating Click Value and ROI with No Background . . . . . . . . 293
Calculating Gross Profit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293
Calculating Breakeven Click Value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 294
What’s the ROI? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 294
Calculating Click Value and ROI Later . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 294
So, Can You Make Money? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 296
Understanding Keywords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 297
Broad vs. Narrow Terms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 298
Doing a Keyword Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 298
Checking Bid Prices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300
CHAPTER 23 Setting Up a Google PPC Campaign . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303
Getting Started . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303
Selecting a Location for Your Ads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 304
Selecting the World or Specific Countries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 305
Selecting a Region or City . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 305
Selecting a Very Precise Region . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 305
Creating Your Ads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 306
Entering Keywords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 307
Bidding on Keywords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 307
Specifying Your Daily Budget . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 310
Entering Your Account Info . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 310
Modifying Keyword Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 310
Changing Bid Prices for Specific Keywords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 311
Changing Target URLs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 313
Keyword Matching Techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 313
Understanding Expanded Matches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 314
Creating New Ads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 315
Turning Off “Content” Placement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 315
Writing Effective Ads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 316
Google’s Editorial Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 317
Going “Live” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 318
CHAPTER 24 Managing Your PPC Campaigns and Measuring Results . . . . . . . . . 319
Viewing PPC Results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 319
Managing Bad CTRs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 323
Why Does Google Do This? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 323
How to “Fix” Low CTRs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 323
Tracking Conversions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 324
Entering Conversion Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 328
Placing the Conversion-tracking Code into Your Site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 328
Using Trackable Links . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 329
xviii How to Make Money Online with eBay, Yahoo!, and Google
Using Other Tracking Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 329
Using the Conversion Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 330
Watching for Click Fraud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 331
CHAPTER 25 Selling Through Shopping Directories: Froogle, Yahoo!
Shopping, and More . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 333
How to Work with the Shopping Directories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 333
Using Froogle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 337
Using Yahoo! Shopping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 338
Other Shopping Directories to Work With . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 338
CHAPTER 26 Improving Natural Search Engine Ranking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 339
Why You Must Understand the Search Engines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 339
Understanding Search Engines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 340
Understanding the Keywords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 343
Making Sure Search Engines Can Index Your Pages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 344
Avoiding the Basic Mistakes Before You Start . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 345
Frames . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 345
Invisible Navigation Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 345
Images and an Absence of Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 347
Macromedia Flash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 348
File and Directory Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 348
Optimizing Pages for Particular Keywords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 349
Understanding the Role of Links . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 351
Getting Links to Your Site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 353
Registering with the Search Engines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 353
CHAPTER 27 Using Affiliate Programs and Other Marketing Techniques . . . . . . 355
Using Affiliate Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 355
Using Coupon and Discount Sites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 358
Promoting Through Newsletters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 359
Creating Your Own Newsletter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 360
Content Syndication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 361
Marketing Through Discussion Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 362
Creating Your Own Discussion Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 363
CHAPTER 28 Selling Through Amazon and Other Merchant Programs . . . . . . . . 365
Selling on Amazon.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 365
Different Ways to Sell Through Amazon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 366
Becoming an Amazon.com Marketplace Pro Merchant . . . . . . . . . . . . . 368
Using PriceGrabber . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 369
Using Half.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 369
Using Overstock.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 370
Using uBid.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 371
Using SmartBargains.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 372
Using Other Merchant Sites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 373
CHAPTER 29 Cross-site Merchandising and Promotions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 375
Understanding Channel Conflict . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 375
Using Your Brick-and-mortar to Promote Your Online Site . . . . . . . . . . 376
Giving People a Reason to Visit Your Site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 378
Using Your Online Site to Promote Your Brick-and-mortar . . . . . . . . . . 379
Using eBay to Push Visitors to Your Web Site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 380
Using Your Site to Help eBay Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 381
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 383


Bookscreen
e-books shop

Introduction
Have you ever thought about setting up a business online? If not…where have you been for
the last five or ten years? It’s the new American dream, encompassing all the usual ideas of
independence, freedom, and wealth. And sometimes, you know, Internet-based businesses really
do bring all these things to their owners.

Not always, though, which is why you need this book. It’s easy to stumble around on the
Internet for months or years, and never quite get anywhere. What’s the difference between those
who stumble and those who leap into online success? Knowledge. You can’t succeed unless you
do the right things, and while some very successful online businesses have been built by people
who serendipitously stumbled onto the right formula, why leave such an important factor to chance?

This book describes the basic principles, ideas, and tools that you’ll need to succeed online.
In addition, it lays out a roadmap; the book focuses on certain tools that many other successful
businesses have employed:
■ eBay This, the world’s most important online marketplace, has been used by tens of
thousands of people to launch new careers and businesses.
■ Yahoo! You’ve heard of Yahoo!’s search system, of course, but did you know that tens
of thousands of businesses use Yahoo!’s e-commerce tools to manage their online sales?
■ Google A business needs traffic, whether it’s “foot traffic” to a brick-and-mortar
store or web traffic to an e-commerce store. Google—and the other “Pay Per Click”
advertising systems—can help you generate that traffic.

We’ve split this book into three main parts. In Part I, you’ll learn how to begin working
through eBay, selling your wares through auctions, Buy It Now sales, and the eBay store.
In Part II, you’ll find out how to set up a Web store using Yahoo!’s low-cost Merchant
Solutions software.

And in Part III, you’ll find out how to generate traffic through Google’s AdWords Pay Per
Click system…as well as how to get traffic from Yahoo!’s Search Marketing Pay Per Click
system through free search-engine traffic, from the price-comparison sites, and via a variety of
other online marketing techniques.

So let’s not waste time…your future beckons. Turn to Chapter 1 and find out how to get started.

Denise Gosnell


e-books shop
e-books shop
Purchase Now !
Just with Paypal



Book Details
 Price
 2.50
 Pages
 329 p
 File Size 
 12,029 KB
 File Type
 PDF format
 ISBN-13
 ISBN-10
 978-0-7645-8445-9
 0-7645-8445-6
 Copyright©   
 2005 by Denise Gosnell 

About the Author
Denise Gosnell is a software attorney with Woodard, Emhardt, Moriarty, McNett & Henry LLP
(www.uspatent.com), a worldwide intellectualproperty law firm based in Indianapolis, Indiana. Denise
has a unique background in both technology and law, and presently uses her deep technical and legal
expertise to counsel hightech clients on intellectual property and technical matters.
Denise has over ten years of experience creating software applications, ranging from standalone and
clientserver to enterprisewide applications. Denise has worked for leading software companies, such as
Microsoft and EDS, and has earned a worldwide reputation for her technology expertise. She received a
Bachelor of Arts degree in Computer Science – Business (summa cum laude) from Anderson University, and a Doctor of Jurisprudence degree from Indiana University School of Law in Indianapolis. Denise has coauthored six other software development books to date: Beginning Access 2003 VBA (Wiley Publishing, Inc.), Visual Basic .NET and SQL Server 2000: Building An Effective Data Layer (Wrox Press), Beginning Visual Basic.NET Databases (Wrox Press), Professional .NET Framework (Wrox Press), Professional SQL Server 2000 (Wrox Press), and MSDE Bible (IDG Books). Denise was a featured technology speaker at the Microsoft European Professional Developer’s Conference in December 2001 and has on numerous occasions
assisted Microsoft’s Training and Certification group in creating new exams for their MCSD and MCSE certifications. She herself holds the MCSD certification.
Denise can be reached at dgosnell@uspatent.com or denisegosnell@yahoo.com.

Introduction
Web APIs are a set of application programming interfaces that can be called over standard Internet protocols. Web APIs and Web services are finally getting real attention in the mainstream. Various types of Web APIs are now available from leading technology companies such as Google, Amazon, eBay, Microsoft, and others. Federal Express, UPS, and many other leading companies have recently released or are working on Web APIs as well. Most of these companies offer a free account for limited use of their Web APIs, but some charge a fee for certain levels of usage.

If you like the idea of generating applications that capitalize on the services of some of these wellknown companies, or if you just want to learn from what these leading companies are doing to aid you in implementing your own Web APIs, then this is the book for you.

What This Book Covers
This book provides a handson guide to using some of the most popular Web APIs in software applications. It provides the nutsandbolts details on how several APIs work, and then offers numerous examples of how to use the APIs in real world situations.
While reading this book, you will learn:
❑ Basic concepts of Web APIs
❑ How Web APIs can be used for professional application development
❑ How to call Web APIs using SOAP over HTTP
❑ How to call Web APIs using HTTPGET (REST)
❑ How to call Web APIs using HTTPPOST
❑ How to use the Google API
❑ How to use the MapPoint API
❑ How to use the Amazon API
❑ How to use the eBay API and SDK
❑ How to use the PayPal API
❑ How to locate additional APIs
❑ Some thirdparty extensions of existing APIs
❑ How to create your own API
❑ How to call Web APIs from Microsoft Office applications
❑ How to call Web APIs from mobile devices
❑ How to use multiple APIs together in realworld case studies

Table of Contents
Acknowledgments ix
Introduction xvii
Chapter 1: Anatomy of a Web API 1
Web APIs versus Web Services 1
Web APIs as XML Web Services 2
What Is XML? 2
Invoking an XML Web Service 3
Summary 14
Chapter 2: Using the Google API 15
Google 101 15
cache: 16
daterange: 17
filetype: 17
inanchor: 18
info: 18
intext: 18
intitle: 18
inurl: 18
link: 19
phonebook: 19
related: 19
site: 19
Introduction to the Google API 19
Signing Up and Obtaining a Key 19
Anatomy of a Google API Query 23
Query Syntax 23
Executing a Query 25
Looping through Results 31
Five Creative Ways to Use the Google API 33
#1—Build a Google Search Feature 33
#2—Return Random Pages 36
#3—Save the Results of a Google Search to a File 37
#4—Use Google to Check Spelling 40
#5—Use the Google Cache to Retrieve a Web Site That Is No Longer Available 42
Other Ways to Use the Google API 45
Third-Party Google Extensions 46
Summary 48
Chapter 3: Using the MapPoint API 49
MapPoint 101 50
Introduction to the MapPoint API 51
Signing Up for an Evaluation Account 52
The MapPoint Software Developer’s Kit (SDK) 58
Anatomy of a MapPoint API Query 59
Available Services 59
Using the Test Environment versus Production 63
Executing a MapPoint Query 63
Five Creative Ways to Use the MapPoint API 71
#1—Obtain Driving Directions 72
#2—Retrieve a Map 75
#3—Perform a Geocode Lookup 77
#4—Find Nearby Places 80
#5—Obtain Information on Points of Interests 82
Other Ways to Use the MapPoint API 84
Third-Party MapPoint Extensions 85
Summary 85
Chapter 4: Using the Amazon.com APIs 87
Amazon 101 88
Introduction to the Amazon APIs 90
Supported Features 90
Signing Up for a Subscription ID 91
Anatomy of Amazon API Queries 96
Amazon.com E-Commerce Service API Query Syntax 97
Help Operation 102
Transaction Operation 102
Alexa Web Information Service API Query Syntax 102
Simple Queue Service API Query Syntax 103
Executing a Query Using HTTP-GET (REST) 104
Executing a Query Using SOAP 106
Looping Through Results 109
Five Creative Ways to Use the Amazon APIs 110
#1—Retrieve Feedback about a Seller with ECS 110
#2—Retrieve Product Pricing with ECS 110
#3—Look Up a Friend or Family Member’s Wish List with ECS 110
#4—Create an Amazon.com Shopping Cart with ECS 111
#5—Retrieve URL Information with Alexa Web Information Service 112
Other Ways to Use the Amazon APIs 112
Third-Party Amazon Extensions 113
Summary 115
Chapter 5: Using the eBay API 117
eBay 101 118
Introduction to the eBay API 118
Supported Features 119
Licensing Options 119
Joining the Developer’s Program and Establishing an Account 119
The eBay API Documentation 124
The eBay Software Developer’s Kit (SDK) 124
Anatomy of an eBay API Query 125
Query Syntax 125
Executing a Query Using HTTP-POST 127
Executing a Query Using SOAP 130
Five Creative Ways to Use the eBay API 132
#1—List an Item for Sale 133
#2—Retrieve a List of Categories 137
#3—Retrieve List of Pending Auctions for Seller 138
#4—Retrieve Winning Bidders of Dutch Auction 141
#5—Retrieve Feedback about a Seller 142
Other Ways to Use the eBay API 144
Third-Party eBay Extensions 145
Summary 146
Chapter 6: Using the PayPal API 147
PayPal 101 148
Introduction to the PayPal API 148
Supported Features 149
Getting Set Up to Use the PayPal API 149
Anatomy of a PayPal API Query 158
Query Syntax 158
Executing a Query 160
Other Ways to Use the PayPal API 162
Third-Party PayPal Extensions 162
Summary 162
Chapter 7: Other Web APIs 163
Faxing APIs 163
Setting Up a Free Developer Account 164
Sending a Test Fax 165
The UPS API 168
Setting Up a UPS Developer Account 168
Submitting a Request to the UPS API 170
The FedEx APIs 172
Setting Up a FedEx Developer Account 173
Submitting Transactions Using FedEx Ship Manager Direct 175
Bloglines Web API 176
Locating Additional Web APIs 178
Summary 180
Chapter 8: Calling Web APIs from Mobile Devices 181
What Devices Support XML Web APIs? 181
Windows Pocket PCs and Smartphones 182
Palm and Other Devices 183
Calling Web APIs from Pocket PC Applications 184
Example 1—Call MapPoint API Using SOAP Protocol to Retrieve Driving Directions 184
Example 2—Call Amazon.com API Using HTTP/GET (REST) Protocol 189
Summary 192
Chapter 9: Calling Web APIs from Microsoft Office 193
Calling Web APIs from VBA Code 193
Calling Web APIs Using VBA with HTTP/POST and HTTP/GET (REST) 194
Calling Web APIs Using SOAP Protocol 196
Calling a Web API from Microsoft Office Using .NET 202
Installing the Necessary Tools 203
Example—Calling Amazon.com Web Service from Word Using
Visual Basic .NET and SOAP 205
Summary 211
Chapter 10: Creating Your Own Web API 213
Designing the API 213
What Features Should the API Offer? 213
Which Protocols Should the API Support? 214
Should the Features Be Free or for a Fee? 215
Creating a Web API 215
Building an API Using Visual Studio .NET 216
Calling the Web API from a Client Application 222
Creating a Web API That Uses Other Programs or Services 224
Summary 224
Chapter 11: Case Study 1—Customer Relations
Management Application 225
Introduction to the Customer Relations Management (CRM) Application 225
Building the Project 228
Build the Database 228
Build the User Interface 230
Build the Modules 237
Touring the Completed Application 260
Summary 263
Chapter 12: Case Study 2—Executive Dashboard Application 265
Introduction to the Executive Dashboard Application 265
Building the User Interface 267
Creating the New Project 267
Adding References to the Web APIs 268
Adding Controls to the Form 270
Building the Code Modules 272
Touring the Completed Application 276
Summary 279
Index 281





Bookscreen
e-book shop

Who This Book Is ForI
The ideal reader has had prior experience with Microsoft .NET development, such as WinForms and
WebForms applications because most or all code examples will be written with .NET. However, the book also provides general explanations that will be useful for people who are familiar with other languages. Thus, prior .NET development experience is not required, but people with prior .NET development experience will find the code examples more familiar and easier to follow.

JJ GEEWAX 

BRIEF CONTENTS

PART 1 GETTING STARTED
■ What is “cloud”? ■ Trying it out: deploying WordPress on Google Cloud  
■ The cloud data center
PART 2 STORAGE
■ Cloud SQL: managed relational storage ■ Cloud Datastore: document storage
■ Cloud Spanner: large-scale SQL ■ Cloud Bigtable: large-scale structured data
■ Cloud Storage: object storage
PART 3 COMPUTING
■ Compute Engine: virtual machines ■ Kubernetes Engine: managed Kubernetes clusters
■ App Engine: fully managed applications ■ Cloud Functions: serverless applications
■ Cloud DNS: managed DNS hosting
PART 4 MACHINE LEARNING
■ Cloud Vision: image recognition ■ Cloud Natural Language: text analysis
■ Cloud Speech: audio-to-text conversion ■ Cloud Translation: multilanguage machine translation
 ■ Cloud Machine Learning Engine: managed machine learning
PART 5 DATA PROCESSING AND ANALYTICS
■ BigQuery: highly scalable data warehouse ■ Cloud Dataflow: large-scale data processing
■ Cloud Pub/Sub: managed event publishing

e-books shop
e-books shop
Purchase Now !
Just with Paypal



Book Details
 Price
 3.50 USD
 Pages
 632 p
 File Size
 25,757 KB
 File Type
 PDF format
 ISBN
 9781617293528
 Copyright   
 ©2018 by Manning Publications Co  

foreword
In the early days of Google, we were a victim of our own success. People loved our
search results, but handling more search traffic meant we needed more servers, which
at that time meant physical servers, not virtual ones. Traffic was growing by something
like 10% every week, so every few days we would hit a new record, and we had to
ensure we had enough capacity to handle it all. We also had to do it all from scratch.
When it comes to our infrastructural challenges, we’ve largely succeeded. We’ve
built a system of data centers and networks that rival most of the world, but until
recently, that infrastructure has been exclusively for us. Google Cloud Platform represents
the natural extension of our infrastructural achievements over the past 15
years or so by allowing everyone to benefit from the efficiency of Google’s data centers
and the years of experience we have running them.
All of this manifests as a collection of products and services that solve hard technical
problems (think data consistency) so that you don’t have to, but it also means
that instead of solving the hard technical problem, you have to learn how to use the
service. And while tinkering with new services is part of daily life at Google, most of
the world expects things to “just work” so they can get on with their business. For
many, a misconfigured server or inconsistent database is not a fun puzzle to solve—it’s a distraction.
Google Cloud Platform in Action acts as a guide to minimize those distractions, demonstrating
how to use GCP in practice while also explaining how things work under the
hood. In this book, JJ focuses on the most important aspects of GCP (like Compute
Engine) but also highlights some of the more recent additions to GCP (like Kubernetes
Engine and the various machine-learning APIs), offering a well-rounded collection of
all that GCP has to offer.
Looking back, Google Cloud Platform has grown immensely. From App Engine in
2008, to Compute Engine in 2012, to several machine-learning APIs in 2017, keeping up
can be difficult. But with this book in hand, you’re well equipped to build what’s next.
URS HÖLZLE
SVP, Technical Infrastructure
Google

preface
I was lucky enough to fall in love with building software all the way back in 1997. This
started with toy projects in Visual Basic (yikes) or HTML (yes, the <blink> and marquee
tags appeared from time to time), and eventually moved on to “real work” using
“more mature languages” like C#, Java, and Python. Throughout that time the infrastructure
hosting these projects followed a similar evolution, starting with free static
hosting and moving on to the “grown-up” hosting options like virtual private servers
or dedicated hosts in a colocation facility. This certainly got the job done, but scaling
up and down was frustrating (you had to place an order and wait a little bit), and the
minimum purchase was usually a full calendar year.
But then things started to change. Somewhere around 2008, cloud computing
became available using Amazon’s new Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2). Suddenly you
had way more control over your infrastructure than ever before thanks to the ability to
turn computers on and off using web-based APIs. To make things even better, you
paid only for the time when the computer was actually running rather than for the
entire year. It really was amazing.
As we now know, the rest is history. Cloud computing expanded into generalized
cloud infrastructure, moving higher and higher up the stack, to provide more and
more value as time went on. More companies got involved, launching entire divisions
devoted to cloud services, bringing with them even more new and exciting products
to add to our toolbox. These products went far beyond leasing virtual servers by the
hour, but the principle involved was always the same: take a software or infrastructure
problem, remove the manual work, and then charge only for what’s used. It just so
happens that Google was one of those companies, applying this principle to its in-house
technology to build Google Cloud Platform.
Fast-forward to today, and it seems we have a different problem: our toolboxes are
overflowing. Cloud infrastructure is amazing, but only if you know how to use it effectively.
You need to understand what’s in your toolbox, and, unfortunately, there aren’t
a lot of guidebooks out there. If Google Cloud Platform is your toolbox, Google Cloud
Platform in Action is here to help you understand all of your tools, from high-level concepts
(like choosing the right storage system) to the low-level details (like understanding
how much that storage will cost).

about this book
Google Cloud Platform in Action was written to provide a practical guide for using all of
the various cloud products and APIs available from Google. It begins by explaining
some of the fundamental concepts needed to understand how cloud works and proceeds
from there to build on these concepts one product at a time, digging into the
details of how different products work and providing realistic examples of how they
can be used.
Who should read this book
Google Cloud Platform in Action is for anyone who builds software products or deals with
hosting them. Familiarity with the cloud is not necessary, but familiarity with the basics
in the software development toolbox (such as SQL databases, APIs, and commandline
tools) is important. If you’ve heard of the cloud and want to know how best to use
it, this book is probably for you.
About the code
This book contains many examples of source code, both in numbered listings and inline
with normal text. In both cases, source code is formatted in a fixed-width font
like this to separate it from ordinary text. Sometimes boldface is used to highlight
code that has changed from previous steps in the chapter, such as when a new feature
adds to an existing line of code.
In many cases, the original source code has been reformatted; we’ve added line
breaks and reworked indentation to accommodate the available page space in the
book. In rare cases, even this was not enough, and listings include line-continuation
markers (➥). Additionally, comments in the source code have often been removed
from the listings when the code is described in the text. Code annotations accompany
many of the listings, highlighting important concepts.
About the author
JJ Geewax received his Bachelor of Science in Engineering in Computer Science from
the University of Pennsylvania in 2008. While an undergrad at UPenn he joined Invite
Media, a platform that enables customers to buy online ads in real time. In 2010 Invite
Media was acquired by Google and, as their largest internal cloud customer, became
the first large user of Google Cloud Platform. Since then, JJ has worked as a Senior
Staff Software Engineer at Google, currently specializing in API design, specifically for
Google Cloud Platform.

table of contents
foreword xvii
preface xix
acknowledgments xxi
about this book xxiii
about the cover illustration xxvii
PART 1 GETTING STARTED
1 What is “cloud”? 3
1.1 What is Google Cloud Platform? 4
1.2 Why cloud? 4
Why not cloud? 5
1.3 What to expect from cloud services 6
Computing 6 ■ Storage 7 ■ Analytics (aka, Big Data) 8
Networking 8 ■ Pricing 9
1.4 Building an application for the cloud 9
What is a cloud application? 9 ■ Example: serving photos 10
Example projects 12
1.5 Getting started with Google Cloud Platform 13
Signing up for GCP 13 ■ Exploring the console 14
Understanding projects 15 ■ Installing the SDK 16
1.6 Interacting with GCP 18
In the browser: the Cloud Console 18 ■ On the command line:
gcloud 20 ■ In your own code: google-cloud-* 22
2 Trying it out: deploying WordPress on Google Cloud 24
2.1 System layout overview 25
2.2 Digging into the database 26
Turning on a Cloud SQL instance 27 ■ Securing your Cloud SQL
instance 28 ■ Connecting to your Cloud SQL instance 30
Configuring your Cloud SQL instance for WordPress 30
2.3 Deploying the WordPress VM 31
2.4 Configuring WordPress 33
2.5 Reviewing the system 36
2.6 Turning it off 37
3 The cloud data center 38
3.1 Data center locations 39
3.2 Isolation levels and fault tolerance 42
Zones 42 ■ Regions 42 ■ Designing for fault tolerance 43
Automatic high availability 45
3.3 Safety concerns 45
Security 46 ■ Privacy 47 ■ Special cases 48
3.4 Resource isolation and performance 48
PART 2 STORAGE
4 Cloud SQL: managed relational storage 53
4.1 What’s Cloud SQL? 54
4.2 Interacting with Cloud SQL 54
4.3 Configuring Cloud SQL for production 60
Access control 60 ■ Connecting over SSL 61 ■ Maintenance
windows 66 ■ Extra MySQL options 67
4.4 Scaling up (and down) 68
Computing power 69 ■ Storage 69
4.5 Replication 71
Replica-specific operations 75
4.6 Backup and restore 75
Automated daily backups 76 ■ Manual data export to
Cloud Storage 77
4.7 Understanding pricing 81
4.8 When should I use Cloud SQL? 83
Structure 83 ■ Query complexity 84 ■ Durability 84
Speed (latency) 84 ■ Throughput 84
4.9 Cost 85
Overall 85
4.10 Weighing Cloud SQL against a VM running MySQL 87
5 Cloud Datastore: document storage 89
5.1 What’s Cloud Datastore? 90
Design goals for Cloud Datastore 91 ■ Concepts 92
Consistency and replication 96 ■ Consistency with
data locality 99
5.2 Interacting with Cloud Datastore 101
5.3 Backup and restore 107
5.4 Understanding pricing 110
Storage costs 110 ■ Per-operation costs 110
5.5 When should I use Cloud Datastore? 111
Structure 111 ■ Query complexity 112 ■ Durability 112
Speed (latency) 112 ■ Throughput 113 ■ Cost 113
Overall 113 ■ Other document storage systems 115
6 Cloud Spanner: large-scale SQL 117
6.1 What is NewSQL? 118
6.2 What is Spanner? 118
6.3 Concepts 118
Instances 119 ■ Nodes 120 ■ Databases 120 ■ Tables 120
6.4 Interacting with Cloud Spanner 121
Creating an instance and database 122 ■ Creating a table 125
Adding data 127 ■ Querying data 127 ■ Altering database
schema 131
6.5 Advanced concepts 132
Interleaved tables 133 ■ Primary keys 136 ■ Split points 137
Choosing primary keys 138 ■ Secondary indexes 139
Transactions 145
6.6 Understanding pricing 152
6.7 When should I use Cloud Spanner? 153
Structure 154 ■ Query complexity 154 ■ Durability 154
Speed (latency) 154 ■ Throughput 154 ■ Cost 155
Overall 155
7 Cloud Bigtable: large-scale structured data 158
7.1 What is Bigtable? 159
Design goals 159 ■ Design nongoals 161
Design overview 162
7.2 Concepts 162
Data model concepts 163 ■ Infrastructure concepts 168
7.3 Interacting with Cloud Bigtable 173
Creating a Bigtable Instance 173 ■ Creating your schema 175
Managing your data 177 ■ Importing and exporting data 181
7.4 Understanding pricing 184
7.5 When should I use Cloud Bigtable? 185
Structure 185 ■ Query complexity 186 ■ Durability 186
Speed (latency) 186 ■ Throughput 186 ■ Cost 187
Overall 187
7.6 What’s the difference between Bigtable and HBase? 190
7.7 Case study: InstaSnap recommendations 191
Querying needs 191 ■ Tables 192 ■ Users table 192
Recommendations table 195 ■ Processing data 196
7.8 Summary 198
8 Cloud Storage: object storage 199
8.1 Concepts 200
Buckets and objects 200
8.2 Storing data in Cloud Storage 201
8.3 Choosing the right storage class 204
Multiregional storage 204 ■ Regional storage 205
Nearline storage 205 ■ Coldline storage 206
8.4 Access control 207
Limiting access with ACLs 207 ■ Signed URLs 213
Logging access to your data 217
8.5 Object versions 219
8.6 Object lifecycles 223
8.7 Change notifications 225
URL restrictions 227
8.8 Common use cases 228
Hosting user content 228 ■ Data archival 229
8.9 Understanding pricing 230
Amount of data stored 231 ■ Amount of data transferred 232
Number of operations executed 233 ■ Nearline and Coldline
pricing 234
8.10 When should I use Cloud Storage? 236
Structure 236 ■ Query complexity 236 ■ Durability 236
Speed (latency) 237 ■ Throughput 237 ■ Overall 237
To-do list 237 ■ E*Exchange 238 ■ InstaSnap 238
PART 3 COMPUTING
9 Compute Engine: virtual machines 243
9.1 Launching your first (or second) VM 244
9.2 Block storage with Persistent Disks 245
Disks as resources 246 ■ Attaching and detaching disks 247
Using your disks 250 ■ Resizing disks 252 ■ Snapshots 253
Images 258 ■ Performance 259 ■ Encryption 261
9.3 Instance groups and dynamic resources 264
Changing the size of an instance group 269 ■ Rolling
updates 270 ■ Autoscaling 274
9.4 Ephemeral computing with preemptible VMs 276
Why use preemptible machines? 277 ■ Turning on preemptible
VMs 278 ■ Handling terminations 278 ■ Preemption
selection 279
9.5 Load balancing 280
Backend configuration 282 ■ Host and path rules 285
Frontend configuration 286 ■ Reviewing the configuration 287
9.6 Cloud CDN 289
Enabling Cloud CDN 290 ■ Cache control 293
9.7 Understanding pricing 294
Computing capacity 294 ■ Sustained use discounts 295
Preemptible prices 298 ■ Storage 298 ■ Network traffic 299
9.8 When should I use GCE? 301
Flexibility 301 ■ Complexity 302 ■ Performance 302
Cost 302 ■ Overall 302 ■ To-Do List 303
E*Exchange 303 ■ InstaSnap 304
10 Kubernetes Engine: managed Kubernetes clusters 306
10.1 What are containers? 307
Configuration 307 ■ Standardization 307 ■ Isolation 309
10.2 What is Docker? 310
10.3 What is Kubernetes? 310
Clusters 312 ■ Nodes 312 ■ Pods 313 ■ Services 314
10.4 What is Kubernetes Engine? 315
10.5 Interacting with Kubernetes Engine 315
Defining your application 315 ■ Running your container
locally 317 ■ Deploying to your container registry 319
Setting up your Kubernetes Engine cluster 320 ■ Deploying
your application 321 ■ Replicating your application 323
Using the Kubernetes UI 325
10.6 Maintaining your cluster 327
Upgrading the Kubernetes master node 327 ■ Upgrading
cluster nodes 329 ■ Resizing your cluster 331
10.7 Understanding pricing 332
10.8 When should I use Kubernetes Engine? 332
Flexibility 332 ■ Complexity 333 ■ Performance 333
Cost 334 ■ Overall 334 ■ To-Do List 334
E*Exchange 335 ■ InstaSnap 335
11 App Engine: fully managed applications 337
11.1 Concepts 338
Applications 339 ■ Services 341 ■ Versions 342
Instances 342
11.2 Interacting with App Engine 343
Building an application in App Engine Standard 344
On App Engine Flex 353
11.3 Scaling your application 361
Scaling on App Engine Standard 362 ■ Scaling on App
Engine Flex 367 ■ Choosing instance configurations 368
11.4 Using App Engine Standard’s managed services 371
Storing data with Cloud Datastore 371 ■ Caching ephemeral
data 372 ■ Deferring tasks 374 ■ Splitting traffic 375
11.5 Understanding pricing 379
11.6 When should I use App Engine? 380
Flexibility 380 ■ Complexity 381 ■ Performance 381
Cost 381 ■ Overall 382 ■ To-Do List 382
E*Exchange 382 ■ InstaSnap 383
12 Cloud Functions: serverless applications 385
12.1 What are microservices? 385
12.2 What is Google Cloud Functions? 386
Concepts 388
12.3 Interacting with Cloud Functions 391
Creating a function 391 ■ Deploying a function 392
Triggering a function 394
12.4 Advanced concepts 395
Updating functions 395 ■ Deleting functions 396
Using dependencies 396 ■ Calling other Cloud APIs 399
Using a Google Source Repository 401
12.5 Understanding pricing 403
13 Cloud DNS: managed DNS hosting 406
13.1 What is Cloud DNS? 407
Example DNS entries 409
13.2 Interacting with Cloud DNS 410
Using the Cloud Console 410 ■ Using the Node.js client 414
13.3 Understanding pricing 418
Personal DNS hosting 418 ■ Startup business DNS hosting 418
13.4 Case study: giving machines DNS names at boot 419
PART 4 MACHINE LEARNING
14 Cloud Vision: image recognition 427
14.1 Annotating images 428
Label annotations 429 ■ Faces 432 ■ Text recognition 435
Logo recognition 437 ■ Safe-for-work detection 440
Combining multiple detection types 441
14.2 Understanding pricing 443
14.3 Case study: enforcing valid profile photos 443
15 Cloud Natural Language: text analysis 446
15.1 How does the Natural Language API work? 447
15.2 Sentiment analysis 448
15.3 Entity recognition 452
15.4 Syntax analysis 455
15.5 Understanding pricing 457
15.6 Case study: suggesting InstaSnap hash-tags 459
16 Cloud Speech: audio-to-text conversion 463
16.1 Simple speech recognition 465
16.2 Continuous speech recognition 467
16.3 Hinting with custom words and phrases 468
16.4 Understanding pricing 469
16.5 Case study: InstaSnap video captions 469
17 Cloud Translation: multilanguage machine translation 473
17.1 How does the Translation API work? 475
17.2 Language detection 477
17.3 Text translation 479
17.4 Understanding pricing 481
17.5 Case study: translating InstaSnap captions 481
18 Cloud Machine Learning Engine: managed machine
learning 485
18.1 What is machine learning? 485
What are neural networks? 486 ■ What is TensorFlow? 488
18.2 What is Cloud Machine Learning Engine? 491
Concepts 492 ■ Putting it all together 495
18.3 Interacting with Cloud ML Engine 498
Overview of US Census data 498 ■ Creating a model 499
Setting up Cloud Storage 501 ■ Training your model 503
Making predictions 506 ■ Configuring your underlying
resources 509
18.4 Understanding pricing 514
Training costs 514 ■ Prediction costs 516
PART 5 DATA PROCESSING AND ANALYTICS
19 BigQuery: highly scalable data warehouse 521
19.1 What is BigQuery? 521
Why BigQuery? 522 ■ How does BigQuery work? 522
Concepts 525
19.2 Interacting with BigQuery 528
Querying data 528 ■ Loading data 533
Exporting datasets 542
19.3 Understanding pricing 544
Storage pricing 544 ■ Data manipulation pricing 545
Query pricing 545
20 Cloud Dataflow: large-scale data processing 547
20.1 What is Apache Beam? 549
Concepts 550 ■ Putting it all together 555
20.2 What is Cloud Dataflow? 556
20.3 Interacting with Cloud Dataflow 557
Setting up 557 ■ Creating a pipeline 559 ■ Executing
a pipeline locally 560 ■ Executing a pipeline using
Cloud Dataflow 561
20.4 Understanding pricing 565
21 Cloud Pub/Sub: managed event publishing 568
21.1 The headache of messaging 569
21.2 What is Cloud Pub/Sub? 569
21.3 Life of a message 569
21.4 Concepts 572
Topics 572 ■ Messages 572 ■ Subscriptions 574
Sample configuration 575
21.5 Trying it out 576
Sending your first message 576 ■ Receiving your
first message 578
21.6 Push subscriptions 581
21.7 Understanding pricing 583
21.8 Messaging patterns 584
Fan-out broadcast messaging 584 ■ Work-queue messaging 587
index 589


Bookscreen
e-books shop

about the cover illustration
The figure on the cover of Google Cloud Platform in Action is captioned, “Barbaresque
Enveloppe Iana son Manteaul.” The illustration is taken from a collection of
dress costumes from various countries by Jacques Grasset de Saint-Sauveur (1757–
1810), titled Costumes de différents pays, published in France in 1797. Each illustration is
finely drawn and colored by hand. The rich variety of Grasset de Saint-Sauveur’s collection
reminds us vividly of how culturally apart the world’s towns and regions were just
200 years ago. Isolated from each other, people spoke different dialects and languages.
In the streets or in the countryside, it was easy to identify where they lived and
what their trade or station in life was just by their dress.
The way we dress has changed since then, and the diversity by region, so rich at the
time, has faded away. It is now hard to tell apart the inhabitants of different continents,
let alone different towns, regions, or countries. Perhaps we have traded cultural
diversity for a more varied personal life—certainly for a more varied and fast-paced
technological life.
At a time when it is hard to tell one computer book from another, Manning celebrates
the inventiveness and initiative of the computer business with book covers
based on the rich diversity of regional life of two centuries ago, brought back to life by
Grasset de Saint-Sauveur’s pictures.
Loading...
DMCA.com Protection Status