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Tibetan Yoga and Secret Doctrines. Second Edition

Tibetan Yoga and Secret Doctrines. Second Edition

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Seven Books of Wisdom of the Great Path Arranged

edited by W. Y. Evans-Wentz

Foreword by DR. MARET

Yogic Commentary by TRANSLATOR-PROFESSOR C H E N - C H I C H A NG


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Book Details
 Price
 3.00
 Pages
 441 p
 File Size 
 2,773 KB
 File Type
 PDF format
 ISBN
 0-19-500278-4 
 Copyright©   
 W. Y. Evans-Wentz, 1958

WISDOM-TEACHINGS AND GOOD-WISHES OF THE ADI-BUDDHA SAMANTA-BHADRA
'The Foundation of all is uncreated, uncompounded, independent,
beyond mental concept and verbal definition. Neither the term Sangsara
nor the term Nirvana can be applied to It. To realize It is to attain
Buddhahood. Not to realize It is to wander in the Sangsara. . . .
'Not knowing the Foundation, beings aforetime erred. They were
overwhelmed by the darkness of unconsciousness, whence sprang ignorance
and error. Immersed in error and obscured by ignorance, the
"knower" became bewildered and afraid. Then arose the concepts
" I " and "Others'', together with hatred. When these had grown
strong, there was born an unbroken current of sangsaric evolution. Then
the ''five poisons" of the obscuring passions, lust, anger, selfishness,
delusion, and jealousy, flourished, and there was produced an interminable
chain of evil karma.
'The root-source of error among sentient beings is thus unconscious
ignorance. And, in virtue of the power of the Good-Wishes of Me, the
Adi-Buddha, may each of them realize the radiant, immaculate mind,
innate in every living thing.'
From The Good-Wishes of the All-Good Buddha Samanta-Bhadia
(Lama Kazi Dawa-Samdup's Translation).
....

Seven Books of Wisdom of the Great Path
Arranged and edited by W. Y. Evans-Wentz
Seven authentic Tibetan yoga texts, almost unknown to the occidental
world until their first publication in English in 1935, are now available
in this Galaxy Book edition. A companion to the unique Tibetan Book
of the Dead (GB 39), which the late Dr. Evans-Wentz also edited, this
volume, illustrated with photographs and reproductions of yoga paintings
and manuscripts, contains some of the principal meditations used by
illustrious Hindu and Tibetan gurus and philosophers through the ages
in attaining Right Knowledge and Enlightenment. The editor, whose
inquiry and research extended through more .than fifteen years in the
Orient, spent much time as a pupil of Hindu sages and Buddhist lamas.
He has included a body of orally transmitted tradition and teachings
received at first hand. These will be of particular interest to anthropologists
and psychologists, and to students of comparative religion and
practically applied Mahayana Yoga. Special commentaries precede each
carefully rendered text, and a comprehensive preface contrasts the tenets
of Buddhism with European concepts of religion, philosophy, and science.
Yoga, the tap root of Hinduism, Jainism, Zen Buddhism, and Taoism,
has also influenced the development of Judaism, Islam and Christianity.
These seven distinct but intimately related books, arranged in orderly
sequence, afford a comprehensive view of the spiritual teachings which
have shaped the culture of the Orient, and which are now increasingly
enriching the West's appreciation of the depths of the human psyche.
The late W. Y. Evans-Wentz, formerly of Jesus College, Oxford, is
also the editor of The Tibetan Book of the Dead (GB 39), The Tibetan
Book of the Great Liberation (GB 260), and Tibet's Great Yogi,
Milarepa (GB 294). His substantial tetralogy of works on yoga, based
on translations from the Tibetan, offers an "interpretation from within"
rarely found in the works of Western scholars. During the early years
of this century Dr. Evans-Wentz lived in India and in Sikkim, at the
invitation at the Maharaja Sidkyong Tulku, 
where he studied occult doctrines intensively.
....


Table of Contents
PREFACE TO THE FIRST EDITION vii
DESCRIPTION OF ILLUSTRATIONS xviii
FOREWORD: From the Celtic Faith in Fairies to the Tibetan
Science of Yoga, by Dr. R. R. Marett xxii
PREFACE TO THE SECOND EDITION . . . . xxv
YOGIC COMMENTARY, by Translator-Professor Chen-Chi Chang xxvii
GENERAL INTRODUCTION 1
I. The Importance and Original Sources of this Volume . I
II. The Commentary 3
III. Some Misconceptions Concerning Buddhism . . . 3
IV. The Incompleteness of the Occident's Knowledge of Buddhism 9
V. The Joyous Optimism of Buddhism 10
VI. The Wisdom of the Mahayana 14
VII. The Yoga Philosophy 21
VIII. Yoga and Religion 35
IX. Buddhistic Yoga .38
X. The Psychology o f the Yogic Visualizations . . . 44
XI. Karma and Rebirth 46
XII. The Exoteric Versus the Esoteric Teachings . . . 49
XIII. The Translating and Editing o f the Texts . . . 51
XIV. The Unity and Practical Value of the Texts 53
XV. The New Renaissance and the Masters of Wisdom. . 54

BOOK I
THE SUPREME PATH OF DISCIPLESHIP: THE
PRECEPTS OF THE GURUS
THE INTRODUCTION -57
I. The Book's Compiler and his Fellow Disciple . . . 57
II. The Transmission of the Teachings 58
III. The Texts of The Precious Rosary 59
IV. The Precepts Compared with Elegant Sayings' . . 60
THE OBEISANCE AND FOREWORD 67
THE TWENTY-EIGHT CATEGORIES OF YOGIC PRECEPTS 67
I. The Ten Causes of Regret 67
II, The Ten Requirements 68
III. The Ten Things to be Done 69
IV. The Ten Things to be Avoided 70
V. The Ten Things Not t o b e Avoided . . . . 70
VI. The Ten Things one Must Know. . . . 71
VII. The Ten Things to be Practised 71
VIII. The Ten Things to be Persevered in . . . 73
IX. The Ten Incentives 73
X. The Ten Errors 74
XI. The Ten Resemblances Wherein One May Err . 75
XII. The Ten Things Wherein One Erreth Not . . 76
XIII. The Thirteen Grievous Failures 76
XIV. The Fifteen Weaknesses 78
XV. The Twelve Indispensable Things . . . . 79
XVI. The Ten Signs o f a Superior Man . . . . 80
XVII. The Ten Useless Things 81
XVIII. The Ten Self-imposed Troubles 82
XIX. The Ten Things Wherein One Doeth Good to Oneself 84
XX. The Ten Best Things 85
XXI. The Ten Grievous Mistakes 86
XXII. The Ten Necessary Things 87
XXIII. The Ten Unnecessary Things 88
XXIV. The Ten More Precious Things 90
XXV. The Ten Equal Things 91
XXVI. The Ten Virtues o f the Holy Dharma. . . . 92
XXVII. The Ten Figurative Expressions. . . . . 96
XXVIII. The Ten Great Joyful Realizations . . . . 98
THE CONCLUSION 99
THE COLOPHON . 100

BOOK II
THE NIRVANIC PATH: THE YOGA OF
THE GREAT SYMBOL
THE INTRODUCTION 101
I. The History of the Great Symbol Teachings . . . 101
II. The Text and the Translation 103
III. The Character of the Great Symbol Teachings . . . 108
IV. The Line of the Gurus 110
THE OBEISANCE AND FOREWORD . . . . 115
PART I: THE PRELIMINARY INSTRUCTIONS: THE
TEMPORAL AND SPIRITUAL TEACHINGS . . 115
PART I I : THE ESSENTIAL SUBJECT MATTER . . 121
The Ordinary Practices 121
1, The Yoga of One-Pointedness 122
2. The Yoga of the Uncreated 135
TABLE OF CONTENTS xiii
The Extra-Ordinary Practices 145
1. The Yoga of Transmuting Phenomena and Mind into
At-One-Ment 145
2. The Yoga of Non- Meditation 148
PART I I I : THE CONCLUSION 150
Recognizing the Great Symbol; and the Four Yogic Attainments 150
Analysing the Impediments and Errors while Treading the Path 151
Differentiating Experiences and Practical from Theoretical Knowledge 153
THE COLOPHON 153

BOOK III
THE PATH OF KNOWLEDGE: THE YOGA OF
THE SIX DOCTRINES
THE INTRODUCTION 155
I. The Four Classes of Tantras 155
II. The Doctrine of the Psychic-Heat 156
III. The Doctrine of the Illusory Body 161
IV. The Doctrine of the Dream-State 164
V. The Doctrine of the Clear Light 166
VI. The Doctrine of the After-Death State . . . .167
VII. The Doctrine of the Consciousness-Transference . . 169
THE OBEISANCE AND FOREWORD 171
CHAPTER I: THE DOCTRINE OF THE PSYCHIC-HEAT 172
Part I: The Five Preliminary Exercises 173
1. Visualizing the Physical Body as being Vacuous . . 173
2. Visualizing the Psychic Nerve-System as being Vacuous 176
3. Visualizing the Protective Circle 177
4. Training the Psychic Nerve-Paths 180
5. Conferring the Gift-Waves' upon the Psychic Nerve-Centres 181
Part II: The Three Fundamental Practices . . . . 184
1. Producing Psychic-Heat 184
2. Psychic-Heat Experiences 195
3. Transcendental Psychic-Heat 200
Part I I I : The Practical Application 202
1 . Obtaining the Benefit o f the Warmth . . . . 202
2. Obtaining the Benefit of the Bliss 204
CHAPTER II: THE DOCTRINE OF THE ILLUSORY BODY 209
Part I: Realizing the Impure Illusory Body to be Maya . 209
Part I I : Realizing the Pure Illusory Body to be Maya . . 210
1. The Maya of the Visualizing State 210
2. The Maya of the Perfected State 212
Part I I I : Realizing All Things t o b e Maya . . . . 214
CHAPTER III: THE DOCTRINE OF THE DREAMSTATE 215
Part I: Comprehending the Nature of the Dream-State. . 215
1. Comprehending It by the Power of Resolution . . 216
2. Comprehending It by the Power of Breath . . . 216
3. Comprehending It by the Power of Visualization . 217
Part I I : Transmuting the Dream-Content . . . . 220
Part I I I : Realizing the Dream-State to be Maya . . . 221
Part IV: Meditating upon the Thatness of the Dream-State . 222
CHAPTER IV: THE DOCTRINE OF THE CLEAR LIGHT 223
Part I : The Fundamental Clear Light . . . . . 223
Part I I : The Clear Light on the Path 224
1. Blending the Nature of the Clear Light with the Path
During the Day-Time 224
2. Blending the Nature of the Clear Light with the Path
During the Night-Time 226
3. Blending the Nature of the Clear Light with the Path
During the After-Death State 229
Part I I I : The Resultant Clear Light 230
CHAPTER V: THE DOCTRINE OF THE AFTER-DEATH STATE 232
Part I: Realizing the State of the Clear Light of the Dharma-
Kaya while in the Bardo 233
1. The Bardo o f the Moments o f Death . . . . 235
2. The Yogic Art of Dying 237
Part I I : Realizing the State of the Sambhoga-Kaya while in the Bardo 238
1. Karmic Results of Inability to Recognize the Clear Light 239
2. Description of the After-Death Existence . . . 240
3. The After-Deat.h Attaining of Enlightenment . . 241
Part I I I : Realizing the State of the Nirmana-Kaya while in the Bardo 242
1. The Bardo of Seeking Rebirth 242
2. The Yogic Art o f Choosing a Womb . . . . 245
TABLE OF CONTENTS xv
CHAPTER VI: THE DOCTRINE OF CONSCIOUSNESSTRANSFERENCE 246
Part I: The Three Transferences 246
Part I I : The Transference of the Consciousness by Meditating upon the Guru 247
1. The Practising 248
2. The Practical Application 250
THE COLOPHON 250

BOOK IV
THE PATH OF TRANSFERENCE: THE YOGA
OF CONSCIOUSNESS-TRANSFERENCE
THE INTRODUCTION 253
I. Pho-wa and its Mastery 253
II. The Related Doctrine of Trongjug 254
III. The Yogic Tale Told by the Gurus 255
IV. The Yogic Tale Concerning Typhoo 256
V. The Secret Lore and its Survival 256
PARTI: THE PROFOUND PATH OF CONSCIOUSNESSTRANSFERENCE 261
The Refuge 261
The Visualizing of Vajra- Yogin! and the Gurus . . . 261
The Prayer to the Gurus 262
The Prayer to the Root-Guru 264
The Meditation upon the Guru 264
The Visualizing of Vajra-Dakini and the Gurus . . . 265
The Colophon 268
PART I I : THE TRANSFERENCE OF THE CONSCIOUSNESS
OF ONE DECEASED 269
The Visualization for Devotees of Lower Degree . . 270
The Application of the Transference by Devotees of Higher Degree 272
The State of the Highest Devotees 273
The Colophon 274
PART I I I : THE DESCRIPTION OF THE LINE OF THE GURUS . 274

BOOK V
THE PATH OF THE MYSTIC SACRIFICE: THE
YOGA OF SUBDUING THE LOWER SELF
THE INTRODUCTION 277
I . The History o f the Doctrine o f Non-Ego . . . . 277
II. The Tibetan Versification 278
III. The Practitioners of the Chad Rite 280
IV. The Essential Teachings 281
V. The Chod Rite as a Mystic Drama 282
VI. The Comparison with the Tibetan Mystery- Play . . 284
VII. The Origin of Disease According to the Lamas . . 285
VIII. The Comparison with the Bali Ceremony of Ceylon . 287
IX. The Art of Exorcism 287
X. The Performance o f the Mystery-Play . . . . 289
XI. The Kinchenjunga War-Dance 294
XII. The Anthropological Interpretation 295
XIII. The Bodhisaltva's Mystic Sacrifice 297
THE YOGIC DANCE WHICH DESTROYETH ERRONEOUS BELIEFS 301
THE YOGIC DANCE OF THE FIVE DIRECTIONS . . 303
THE TRANSFIXING OF THE ELEMENTALS OF SELF . 306
THE VISUALIZING OF THE GURUS AND DEITIES . 307
THE YOGINS PRAYER, AND RESOLUTION . . 308-9
THE DEDICATION OF THE ILLUSORY BODY IN SACRIFICE 309
THE PRAYER TO THE GURU 310
THE VISUALIZING OF THE CORPSE AND WRATHFUL GODDESS 311
THE SUMMONS TO THE SACRIFICIAL FEAST . . 312
THE OFFERING OF THE SACRIFICIAL FEAST IN WORSHIP 314
THE OFFERING OF THE SACRIFICIAL FEAST TO SPIRITUAL BEINGS 315
THE DEDICATING OF THE ACT OF SACRIFICE . . 315
THE DEDICATING OF THE MERIT OF THE ACT OF SACRIFICE 316
THE COLOPHON 318
THE ADDENDUM 319
I. The Objects Needed for Practising the Rite . . . 319
II. The Place and the Mental Imagery Prescribed . . 321
III. Directions to the Yogin 323
IV. The Visualizing of the Mandala 324
V. The Mixed, the Red, and the Black Feast . . . 325
VI. The Meditation to Accompany the Sacrificial Offering . 327
VII. The Time for Performing the Various Feasts . . . 328
VIII. The Visualizing of the Human Skeleton and Wrathful
Dakini . . . . . . . . . . 329
IX. The State of Mind Necessary 331
X. The Final Meditation 332
XI. The Good-Wishes and Benediction . . . . 333
XII. The Conclusion 333

BOOK VI
THE PATH OF THE FIVE WISDOMS: THE
YOGA OF THE LONG HUM
THE INTRODUCTION: THE YOGA OF THE FIVE WISDOMS . 335
THE SYMBOLIC SIGNIFICANCE OF THE LONG HUM . 339
THE OBEISANCE AND MEDITATION . . . .340
THE CONCLUDING MANTRA 341

BOOK VII
THE PATH OF THE TRANSCENDENTAL
WISDOM: THE YOGA OF THE VOIDNESS
THE INTRODUCTION 343
I. The Prajna-Paramita: its History and Esotericism . . 343
II. Translations from a n Apocr3'phal Text . . . . 346
III. The Canonical Texts and Commentaries . . . . 347
IV. The Doctrine of the Voidness Viewed Historically . . 349
V. The Absolute a s Inherent i n Phenomena . . . . 351
VI. The Practising o f the Prajna-Paramita . . . . 352
THE OBEISANCE 355
THE SANSKRIT AND TIBETAN TITLE . . . . 355
THE QUESTION OF SHARI-PUTRA 355
THE REPLY BY AVALOKITESHVARA . . . .356
THE MANTRA OF THE PRAJNA-PARAMITA . . . 358
THE BUDDHA'S APPROVAL 358
THE ADDENDUM 359
I . The Superiority o f the Prajna-Paramita . . . . 359
II. The Three Kinds of Prajna 361
III. The Personal Ego 362
IV. The Existence or Non-Existence of Atoms . . . 363
INDEX 365


Screenbook
Evans Wentz-Tibetan Yoga and Secret Doctrines
....
OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS
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First published by Oxford University Press, London, 1935
Second Edition, 1958
First published as an Oxford University Press paperback, 1967
This reprint 1978
Printed in the United States of America

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