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The Daily Stoic

The Daily Stoic

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366 Meditations on Wisdom, Perseverance, and the Art of Living

by Ryan Holiday and Stephen Hanselman

Translations by Stephen Hanselman


The Daily Stoic- 366 Meditations on Wisdom, Perseverance, and the Art of Living
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Book Details
 Price
 6.00
 Pages
 998 p
 File Size 
 2,662 KB
 File Type
 PDF format
 ISBN
 9780735211742 (e-book)
 Copyright©   
 2016 by Ryan Holiday
 and Stephen Hanselman


“Of all people only those are at leisure who make time for philosophy, only they truly live. Not satisfied to merely keep good watch over their own days, they annex every age to their own. All the harvest of the past is added to their store. Only an ingrate would fail to see that these great architects of venerable thoughts were born for us and have designed a way of life for us.”
—SENECA

Introduction
The private diaries of one of Rome’s greatest emperors, the personal letters of one of Rome’s best
playwrights and wisest power brokers, the lectures of a former slave and exile, turned influential
teacher. Against all odds and the passing of some two millennia, these incredible documents survive.
What do they say? Could these ancient and obscure pages really contain anything relevant to modern
life? The answer, it turns out, is yes. They contain some of the greatest wisdom in the history of the  world.
Together these documents constitute the bedrock of what is known as Stoicism, an ancient philosophy
that was once one of the most popular civic disciplines in the West, practiced by the rich and the
impoverished, the powerful and the struggling alike in the pursuit of the Good Life. But over the centuries, knowledge of this way of thinking, once essential to so many, slowly faded from view.
Except to the most avid seekers of wisdom, Stoicism is either unknown or misunderstood. Indeed, it
would be hard to find a word dealt a greater injustice at the hands of the English language than “Stoic.”
To the average person, this vibrant, action-oriented, and paradigm-shifting way of living has become
shorthand for “emotionlessness.” Given the fact that the mere mention of philosophy makes most nervous or bored, “Stoic philosophy” on the surface sounds like the last thing anyone would want to learn about, let alone urgently need in the course of daily life.
What a sad fate for a philosophy that even one of its occasional critics, Arthur Schopenhauer, would
describe as “the highest point to which man can attain by the mere use of his faculty of reason.”
Our goal with this book is to restore Stoicism to its rightful place as a tool in the pursuit of selfmastery,
perseverance, and wisdom: something one uses to live a great life, rather than some esoteric
field of academic inquiry.
Certainly, many of history’s great minds not only understood Stoicism for what it truly is, they sought it
out: George Washington, Walt Whitman, Frederick the Great, Eugène Delacroix, Adam Smith, Immanuel Kant, Thomas Jefferson, Matthew Arnold, Ambrose Bierce, Theodore Roosevelt, William Alexander Percy, Ralph Waldo Emerson. Each read, studied, quoted, or admired the Stoics.
The ancient Stoics themselves were no slouches. The names you encounter in this book—Marcus
Aurelius, Epictetus, Seneca—belonged to, respectively, a Roman emperor, a former slave who triumphed to become an influential lecturer and friend of the emperor Hadrian, and a famous playwright and political adviser. There were Stoics like Cato the Younger, who was an admired politician; Zeno was a prosperous merchant (as several Stoics were); Cleanthes was a former boxer and worked as a water carrier to put himself through school; Chrysippus, whose writings are now completely lost but tallied more than seven hundred books, trained as a long-distance runner; Posidonius served as an ambassador;
Musonius Rufus was a teacher; and many others.
Today (especially since the recent publication of The Obstacle Is the Way), Stoicism has found a new
and diverse audience, ranging from the coaching staffs of the New England Patriots and Seattle Seahawks to rapper LL Cool J and broadcaster Michele Tafoya as well as many professional athletes, CEOs, hedge fund managers, artists, executives, and public men and women.
What have all these great men and women found within Stoicism that others missed?
A great deal. While academics often see Stoicism as an antiquated methodology of minor interest, it
has been the doers of the world who found that it provides much needed strength and stamina for their
challenging lives. When journalist and Civil War veteran Ambrose Bierce advised a young writer that
studying the Stoics would teach him “how to be a worthy guest at the table of the gods,” or when the
painter Eugène Delacroix (famous for his painting Liberty Leading the People) called Stoicism his
“consoling religion,” they were speaking from experience. So was the brave abolitionist and colonel
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, who led the first all-black regiment in the U.S. Civil War and produced
one of the more memorable translations of Epictetus. The Southern planter and writer William Alexander Percy, who led the rescue efforts in the Great Flood of 1927, had a unique reference point when he said of Stoicism that “when all is lost, it stands fast.” As would the author and angel investor Tim Ferriss, when he referred to Stoicism as the ideal “personal operating system” (other high-powered executives like Jonathan Newhouse, CEO of Condé Nast International, have agreed).
But it’s for the field of battle that Stoicism seems to have been particularly well designed. In 1965, as
Captain James Stockdale (future Medal of Honor recipient) parachuted from his shot-up plane over
Vietnam into what would ultimately be a half decade of torture and imprisonment, whose name was on his lips? Epictetus. Just as Frederick the Great reportedly rode into battle with the works of the Stoics in his saddlebags, so too did marine and NATO commander General James “Mad Dog” Mattis, who carried the Meditations of Marcus Aurelius with him on deployments in the Persian Gulf, Afghanistan, and Iraq. Again, these weren’t professors but practitioners, and as a practical philosophy they found Stoicism perfectly suited to their purposes.
....


Table of Contents
ALSO BY RYAN HOLIDAY
TITLE PAGE
COPYRIGHT
DEDICATION
EPIGRAPH
INTRODUCTION
PART I: THE DISCIPLINE OF PERCEPTION
JANUARY: CLARITY
FEBRUARY: PASSIONS AND EMOTIONS
MARCH: AWARENESS
APRIL: UNBIASED THOUGHT
PART II: THE DISCIPLINE OF ACTION
MAY: RIGHT ACTION
JUNE: PROBLEM SOLVING
JULY: DUTY
AUGUST: PRAGMATISM
PART III: THE DISCIPLINE OF WILL
SEPTEMBER: FORTITUDE AND RESILIENCE
OCTOBER: VIRTUE AND KINDNESS
NOVEMBER: ACCEPTANCE / AMOR FATI
DECEMBER: MEDITATION ON MORTALITY
STAYING STOIC
A MODEL OF LATE STOIC PRACTICE AND GLOSSARY OF KEY TERMS AND PASSAGES
A WORD ON THE TRANSLATIONS, REFERENCES, AND SOURCES
SUGGESTIONS FOR FURTHER READING


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The Daily Stoic- 366 Meditations on Wisdom, Perseverance, and the Art of Living
....
An imprint of Penguin Random House LLC
375 Hudson Street
New York, New York 10014

Description: New York : Portfolio, 2016.
Identifiers: LCCN 2016030358 | ISBN 9780735211735 (hardcover) | ISBN 9780735211742 (e-book) Subjects: LCSH: Stoics. Classification: LCC B528 .H65 2016 | DDC 188—dc23 LC record available at https://lccn.loc.gov/2016030358

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