-->
Navigation
Chinese Medical Qigong

Chinese Medical Qigong

Now pay Easier and Secure using Paypal
Price:

Read more

Editor in Chief: Tianjun Liu, O.M.D.

Associate Editor in Chief: Xiao Mei Qiang, L.Ac ., MSTOM

Printed and bound in Great Britain


www.e-books.vip
Just with Paypal



Book Details
 Price
 3.00
 Pages
 410 p
 File Size 
 3,582 KB
 File Type
 PDF format
 eISBN
 978 0 85701 017 9
 Copyright©   
 Tianjun Liu 2010 and 2013 

Editorial and Translation Boards
Editor in Chief: Tianjun Liu
Tianjun Liu, O.M.D., is Director of the Qigong research laboratory at Beijing
University of Chinese Medicine where he has taught Qigong for more than 20
years. He is also secretary general of the National Qigong Education and Study
Association, secretary general of China Academic Society of Medical Qigong,
and the first government approved academic mentor for Ph.D. candidates in the
field of Medical Qigong in China. For the past decade, Dr. Liu has been Editor
in Chief of Qigong Study in Chinese Medicine, the only official Qigong textbook
used in universities and colleges of Traditional Chinese Medicine in China.
Associate Editor in Chief: Xiao Mei Qiang
Xiao Mei Qiang, L.Ac., MSTOM, is a New York State licensed acupuncturist
and a Board Certified herbalist. In 1975, she started Traditional Chinese
Medicine (TCM) study in her apprenticeship with Dr. Zhichun Zhang, a retired
doctor and professor from Beijing Chinese Medical College. At the same time,
she began acupuncture training in an apprenticeship with Dr. Ciguang Sun
and Dr. Yuying Sun, who inherited Chinese medicine knowledge and special
acupuncture skills from their older generation and who were the principal
acupuncture doctors in the Beijing Police Hospital. Qiang moved to the
United States in 1990. She started out studying physical therapy, working in
rehabilitation medicine for more than 13 years. She completed further training
in Acupuncture and Herbology at the Pacific College of Oriental Medicine in
New York where she earned her Master’s degree in TCM. She has also trained
in Tung’s Acupuncture and in Japanese-style Acupuncture and has received
certification from Harvard Medical School. Qiang currently practices Chinese
medicine in her private office in Manhattan. She is an expert in treating pain,
all kinds of headaches, post-stroke conditions, and neurologic disorders. Two
Chinese journals, How2USA and China Fortune, reported her successful treatment
of post-stroke and neurologic patients, and she received the Contribution Award
of 2008 from the All Chinese Who’s Who Awards.
....
Chinese Translation Board
Li Xiaoli (李晓莉), Beijing University of Chinese Medicine (北京中医药大学)
Liu Lili (刘力力), Yunnan College of Chinese Medicine (云南中医学院)
Liu Tianfu (刘天福), Beijing Forestry University (北京林业大学)
Liu Tianjun (刘天君), Beijing University of Chinese Medicine (北京中医药大学)
Ma Liangxiao (马良宵), Beijing University of Chinese Medicine (北京中医药大学)
Qin Lixin (秦立新), Beijing University of Chinese Medicine (北京中医药大学)
Shen Yi (沈艺), Beijing University of Chinese Medicine (北京中医药大学)
Sun Yijun (孙艺军), Beijing University of Chinese Medicine (北京中医药大学)
Zhang Haibo (张海波), Beijing University of Chinese Medicine (北京中医药大学)
Zhao Xia (赵霞), Beijing University of Chinese Medicine (北京中医药大学)
English Language Editorial board
Editor in Chief
Liu Tianjun (刘天君), Beijing University of Chinese Medicine (北京中医药大学)
Associate Editor in Chief
Xiao Mei Qiang, L.Ac., MSTOM (TCM practitioner)
Bilingual Verifying and Editing Team
Xiao Mei Qiang, L.Ac. (TCM practitioner)
Kevin W Chen, Ph.D., M.P.H. (University of Maryland)
Pan He, OTR/L, M.S. (Mercy College, NY)
Phoenix Liu, Ph.D. (University of Maryland)
Gang Peng, O.M.D., Ph.D, L.Ac. (Acupuncture and Natural Medicine)
Final Consulting Editors
Kenneth S. Cohen, M.A., M.S.Th. (Qigong Research & Practice Center)
Linda Nadia Hole, M.D. (Integrative Medicine Physician)
Roger Jahnke, O.M.D., L.Ac. (Institute of Integral Qigong and Tai Chi)
Lyn B. Lowry, Ph.D., L.Ac. (University of Maryland)
Sharon Montes, M.D. (Integrative Medicine Physician)
Douglas Wile, Ph.D. (Brooklyn College of CUNY)

Editor’s Foreword
Since the English hardback edition of Chinese Medical Qigong was published in
London in 2010, three years have passed in a flash. When the hardback edition
was published, the idea of publishing the book in paperback had already been
conceived. The hardback edition is a full text translation of the original Chinese
textbook. It is useful because it reports reliably on the whole panorama of the
subject of Chinese Medical Qigong. But there are also possible shortcomings
to it, for such a translation, with so much space and attention devoted to the
academic aspects, may not be suitable for Western general readers.

The length of this paperback edition is about two-thirds that of the
hardback. The chapters on classical Qigong literature and Qigong history in
China have been reduced, taking into account that they are not central to the
demands of Western general readers. And the number of Qigong forms and
the diseases for which treatment by Qigong is appropriate are fewer than in
the hardback. However, in addition to cutting some material, the content has
been revised, and new content has been added for the paperback. In the three
years since the hardback was published in English, a new Chinese edition of the
Chinese Medical Qigong textbook has been issued, and the recent research results
on Qigong published in it have been included in the paperback, thus keeping
up with the pace of the times. The following are several important differences
between the contents of the paperback and hardback editions.

The definition of Qigong in the paperback has been revised a little: two
words have been added, and the word order adjusted. The definition in the
hardback is: Qigong is the skill of body-mind exercise that integrates body, breath and
mind adjustments into one. In the paperback the definition is: Qigong is the skill
of body-mind exercise that integrates three adjustments of body, breath and mind into
one. The changes allow the definition to express more clearly the relationship
between the operational contents (body, breath, and mind adjustments) of
Qigong and its operational aim (integrate the three adjustments into one), and it
is easier to understand. Actually, the definition of Qigong is the cornerstone of
Qigong academic theory—one can say that a single word is worth a thousand
pieces of gold, so any effort that can make the definition more accurate is
worth doing. Moreover, such a revision shows that the definition of Qigong is
not immutable and frozen, and as our understanding of the essence of Qigong
deepens, its definition will also be deepened, although the correct and most
scientific understanding is not easy to reach. As well as the revised Qigong
definition, in this edition some other definitions of basic concepts, such as
“keep the mind on” and “mental visualization,” have also been revised, as the
reader will discover.

The most substantial additions and revisions in the paperback are the
chapters on current scientific research into Qigong, and these reflect the
continuing progress in the field of research. It should be said that modern
scientific research into Qigong is still in its infancy. The characteristics of such
a stage are that the research works are sometimes hot and sometimes cold,
sometimes back and sometimes forth, with multi-disciplinary and miscellaneous
research directions, and most especially, there are no clear and effective research
methods. Currently, the overall situation in this field is that the research results
are many, but their reliability is not good enough. Some new research has been
added to the paperback, some older research findings with poor reliability have
been deleted.

One new piece of research is into EEG topographic during Qigong exercise.
The research reveals that, in the process of Qigong exercise, the main thinking
form of subjects changes from the abstract and image thinking of daily life to
perceptual thinking in the Qigong state. It is well-known that in comparing
Qigong exercise with physical exercise, the most important distinction between
them is that the former exercises towards the internal, whereas the latter
towards the external, as in the expression “internal cultivation supports essence,
Qi and spirit, while external cultivation supports sinew, bone and skin.” To
realize internal cultivation, the subject must rely on internal exercise skills, and
changing the thinking form is the key skill.

It should be pointed out that “perceptual thinking” is a new term. The word
“perceptual” is borrowed from “perceptual psychology,” but here it is used in
another sense, which has two aspects. First, the original meaning of “perceptual
psychology” is to research integrative sensory processes which react to external
stimuli, but the meaning of “perceptual thinking” is to research the processes of
creating internal sensation without external stimuli. So the word “perceptual”
in different terms indicates different sensory processes. Because to create
internal sensation is a conscious, active and purposive process carried out by the
consciousness, it is a form of thinking: perceptual thinking. Second, perceptual
thinking is not only a psychological activity, but also a psychosomatic activity.
One experiment has shown that with the same thinking theme (i.e. subjects
thinking about the same topic) the EEG changed when subjects were engaged
in abstract thinking and image thinking, but both EEG and EMG changed in
perceptual thinking.

The research above advanced understanding of the distinctive thinking form
during Qigong exercise, and found a new way to clarify the physiological and
psychological mechanisms of Qigong exercise. It is also very useful to Qigong
practitioners for it can guide Qigong exercise through scientific data. However,
although the research has been introduced in the appropriate chapters in the
paperback, the book is not a scientific paper, for it is difficult to explain any
single piece of research in detail. So if readers are interested in the research, the
relevant research literature needs to be consulted.

The basic operation of Qigong is always the core part of a Qigong textbook,
and the chapter devoted to this has been strengthened in the paperback edition.
In the final analysis, learning Qigong must be done in actual practice; as the
definition of Qigong says, Qigong exercise is a kind of skill training. The
content of the basic operation of Qigong includes the main Qigong exercise
skills and their standardizations. According to recent research, in Qigong
exercise the major skill is to integrate the three adjustments of body, breath
and mind into one. It is also the main distinction between Qigong exercise and
physical exercise. Both Qigong and physical exercise involve the same three
adjustments, but Qigong exercise emphasizes integrating them into one, while
in physical exercise, the three adjustments are always operated distinctly, and
one of them, especially body adjustment, is often emphasized.

Compared with the hardback, the content of the paperback is more focused
on practical application, so it is more appropriate for readers who want to learn
Qigong exercise. In my own experience, I want to tell Qigong lovers that the
basic method of Qigong exercise is to choose a Qigong form that you like,
and to exercise the three adjustments of body, breath and mind in each section
of the form step by step, from practicing them one by one individually to
integrating them into one. When you can stay in one state during your exercise
from beginning to end, you have mastered the form. After you have learned
one Qigong form, if you want, you can learn one or two others. But please
remember, there is no need to learn a lot of Qigong forms, because any Qigong
form is only a means or vehicle to reach the unified state of Qigong. The goal
of learning Qigong exercise is not to master a Qigong form, but to hold the
Qigong state. As for what kind of Qigong form is better for you, it is different
from person to person. Generally speaking, the form that you like may be a
suitable form for you, for there will be some factors consistent between you
and that form, otherwise you wouldn’t like it. Furthermore, if you persevere in
exercising just the form you are fond of for a long time, you can reach success.

Finally, I want to give special thanks to two ladies—Xiao Mei and Jessica.
The associate editor in chief of this paperback edition, Xiao Mei, is an excellent
acupuncture doctor. Her bilingual Chinese and English skills and her rich
knowledge of Chinese medicine mean that she has edited this book successfully
and magnificently. Jessica is the head of the publishing house that has published
this book. She has herself reviewed the full text of the paperback and polished
the language as a native English speaker. Therefore, it is an honor to publish this
book with Singing Dragon.
Liu Tianjun
Beijing, 23 January 2013
....


Table of Contents
Editor’s Foreword .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 11
General Introduction .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 15
I. Essential Concepts of CMQ .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  15
II. The Academic System of CMQ .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  22
III. Subjects Related to CMQ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
IV. The Study of CMQ .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  26
Part I Fundamental Theories 29
Chapter 1 The Origins of Qigong and the
Major Schools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
1. The Origin of Qigong .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 30
I. Historical Texts .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  31
II. Medical Texts .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  31
III. Archaeological Discoveries .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  32
2. Traditional Major Qigong Schools .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 34
I. Medical Qigong . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
II. Daoist Qigong . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
III. Buddhist Qigong .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  39
IV. Confucian Qigong .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  40
V. Martial Arts Qigong .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  42
Chapter 2 Classical Theories . . . . . . . 45
1. Theories of Medical Qigong .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 45
I. Theory of Yin-Yang and the Five Elements .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  46
II. Zang-Fu (Visceral Manifestation) and Meridian Theory .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  50
III. The Theory of Essence-Qi-Spirit .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  55
2. Theories of Other Qigong Schools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
I. Daoist Qigong Theory .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  58
II. Buddhist Qigong Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
III. Confucian Qigong Theory .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  75
IV. Martial Arts Qigong Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Chapter 3 Modern Scientific Research
on Qigong .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 81
1. Summary of Modern Research on Qigong . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
I. Development of Modern Research on Qigong .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  81
II. Trends and Controversy in Qigong Research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
2. Physiological Effects of Qigong .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 89
I. Effects of Qigong on the Respiratory System .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  90
II. Effect of Qigong on the Cardiovascular System .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  93
III. Effects of Qigong on Neuroelectrophysiology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
3. Psychological Effects of Qigong .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 102
I. Operational Mechanism of Adjusting Mind in Qigong Practice .  .  .  .  103
II. Psychological Elements of External Qi Therapy .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  106
Part II Practical Methods and Skills 111
Chapter 4 Basic Operations of Qigong
Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
1. Adjustment of Body .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 112
I. External Adjustments .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  113
II. Internal Adjustment .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  125
2. Adjustment of Breath .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 129
I. Adjustment of Breathing Types .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  129
II. Adjustment of Breathing Air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
3. Adjustment of Mind . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
I. Operation of Mind Adjustment (Yi Nian Tiao Kong, 意念调控) . . . . 136
II. Adjustment of the Mental Realm (Jing Jie Tiao Kong, 境界调控) . . . 141
4. Integrating Three Adjustments into One .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 144
I. Consolidating Method .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  145
II. Extending Method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
III. Characteristics of the State Integrating Three Adjustments into One .  148
Chapter 5 General Introduction
to Qigong Forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
1. Classification of Qigong Forms .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 149
I. Classification of Qigong by Academic Schools or Traditions .  .  .  .  .  .  149
II. Classification by Dynamic/Static Types .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  152
III. Classification by the Three Adjustments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
IV. Classification by Practice Style or Characteristics .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  153
2. Guidelines and Precautions for Practice .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 155
I. Guidelines .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  155
II. Precautions Before and After Practicing .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  158
3. Possible Reactions to Qigong Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
I. Normal Reactions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
II. Adverse Reactions .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  162
4. Qigong Deviations and Corrections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164
I. The Causes of Deviation .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  165
II. Symptoms of Deviation .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  165
III. Classifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167
IV. Treatment Methods for Correction of Deviations .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  168
Chapter 6 Selected Qigong Forms .  .  .  .  . 174
1. Five-Animal Frolics (五禽戏) .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 174
I. Practice Method .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  176
II. Application .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  180
2. The Six Syllable Formula (六字诀) .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 181
I. Practice Method .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  182
II. Application .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  189
3. Muscle/Tendon Changing Classic (易筋经) . . . . . . . . . . . . 190
I. Practice Method .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  190
II. Application .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  201
4. Eight Pieces of Brocade (八段锦) .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 202
I. Practice Method .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  203
II. Application .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  207
5. Five Elements Palm (五行掌) .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 208
I. Practice Method .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  209
II. Application .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  214
6. Health Preserving Qigong (保健功) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
I. Practice Method .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  216
II. Application .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  224
7. Post Standing Qigong (站桩功) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224
I. Practice Method .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  225
II. Application .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  231
8. Relaxation Qigong (放松功) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 232
I. Practice Method .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  232
II. Application .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  237
9. Internal Nourishing Qigong (内养功) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237
I. Practice Method .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  238
II. Application .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  247
10. Roborant Qigong (强壮功) .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 247
I. Practice Method .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  248
II. Application .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  251
11. New Qigong Therapy (新气功疗法) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251
I. Practice Method .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  252
II. Application .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  259
Part III Clinical Applications 261
Chapter 7 General Introduction to
Qigong Therapy .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 262
1. Characteristics and Indications of Qigong Therapy .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 262
I. Characteristics of Qigong Therapy .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  262
II. Indications and Contraindications of Qigong Therapy . . . . . . . . . 265
2. Principles of Administering Treatment by Syndrome Differentiation
in Qigong Therapy .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 269
I. Recognizing TCM Syndromes and Administering Qigong by
Syndrome Differentiation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 269
II. Administering Qigong Suitably to Individual, Time, and Location .  .  279
3. Standard Procedures and Clinical Routine of Qigong Therapy .  .  . 285
I. Qigong Prescription . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 285
II. Qigong Treatment Methods .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  288
III. The Treatment Process of Qigong .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  292
Chapter 8 Examples of Clinical
Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 296
1. Hypertension .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 296
I. Main Qigong Forms .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  297
II. Administer Qigong Forms by Syndrome Differentiation . . . . . . . . 299
III. Cautions .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  301
Appendix: Ancient Qigong Therapy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 302
2. Coronary Artery Disease .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 304
I. Main Qigong Forms .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  305
II. Administer Qigong Forms by Syndrome Differentiation . . . . . . . . 307
III. Cautions .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  309
Appendix: Ancient Qigong Therapy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 309
3. Peptic Ulcers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 311
I. Main Qigong Forms .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  312
II. Administer Qigong Forms by Syndrome Differentiation . . . . . . . . 312
III. Cautions .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  316
Appendix: Ancient Qigong Therapy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 316
4. Chronic Liver Diseases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 319
I. Main Qigong Forms .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  321
II. Administer Qigong Forms by Syndrome Differentiation . . . . . . . . 323
III. Cautions .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  325
Appendix: Ancient Qigong Therapy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 326
5. Diabetes Mellitus .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 327
I. Main Qigong Forms .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  328
II. Administer Qigong Forms by Syndrome Differentiation . . . . . . . . 330
III. Cautions .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  333
Appendix: Ancient Qigong Therapy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 333
6. Obesity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 335
I. Main Qigong Forms .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  336
II. Administer Qigong Forms by Syndrome Differentiation . . . . . . . . 337
III. Cautions .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  340
Appendix: Ancient Qigong Therapy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 340
7. Menopause Syndrome .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 342
I. Main Qigong Forms .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  343
II. Administer Qigong Forms by Syndrome Differentiation . . . . . . . . 346
III. Cautions .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  347
Appendix: Ancient Qigong Therapy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 348
8. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 349
I. Main Qigong Forms .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  351
II. Administer Qigong Forms by Syndrome Differentiation . . . . . . . . 352
III. Cautions .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  354
Appendix: Ancient Qigong Therapy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 354
9. Insomnia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 356
I. Main Qigong Forms .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  357
II. Administer Qigong Forms by Syndrome Differentiation . . . . . . . . 359
III. Cautions .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  361
Appendix: Ancient Qigong Therapy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 361
10. Tumor and Cancer .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 362
I. Main Qigong Forms .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  363
II. Administer Qigong Forms by Syndrome Differentiation . . . . . . . . 364
III. Cautions .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  366
Appendix: Ancient Qigong Therapy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 366
11. Lower Back Pain and Leg Pain .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 368
I. Main Qigong Forms .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  369
II. Administer Qigong Forms by Syndrome Differentiation . . . . . . . . 372
III. Cautions .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  374
Appendix: Ancient Qigong Therapy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 375
12. Cervical Spondylosis .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 377
I. Main Qigong Forms .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  378
II. Administer Qigong Forms by Syndrome Differentiation . . . . . . . . 379
III. Cautions .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  381
Appendix: Ancient Qigong Therapy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 382
13. Myopia .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 383
I. Main Qigong Forms .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  384
II. Administer Qigong Froms by Syndrome Differentiation . . . . . . . . 389
III. Cautions .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  391
Appendix: Ancient Qigong Therapy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 391
A Brief Chronology of the Dynasties in the History of China .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 393
The Editors .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . .  .  .  . 395
Editorial and Translation Boards .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 396
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 398


Screenbook
Chinese Medical Qigong
....

English language edition first published in 2010
This edition published in 2013
by Singing Dragon
an imprint of Jessica Kingsley Publishers
116 Pentonville Road
London N1 9JB, UK
and
400 Market Street, Suite 400
Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA

0