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365 Habits of Successful Graphic Designers

365 Habits of Successful Graphic Designers

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Insider Secrets from Top Designers on Working Smart and Staying Creative


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Book Details
 Price
 3.00
 Pages
 495 p
 File Size 
 120,160 KB
 File Type
 PDF format
 eISBN-13
 978-1-61058-144-8       
 Copyright©   
 2011 BY ROCKPORT PUBLISHERS 

About the Authors
LAUREL SAVILLE
WWW.LAURELSAVILLE.COM
Laurel Saville is the author of many books and articles on design and designers. She
is also a corporate communications consultant, brand strategist, and copywriter and
the author of numerous essays and short stories along with the award-winning memoir,
Unraveling Anne, about her mother’s life among the artists and hippies of Los Angeles in
the 1960s and 1970s, as well as her tragic decline and death.
STEVE GORDON, JR,
WWW.RDQLUS.COM
Steve Gordon, Jr has been a professional graphic designer for more than ten years.
He’s run the full range of the career path with experience including production design,
in-house design, and agency and studio work, and is currently an independent designer
and creative consultant under the moniker RDQLUS.
A self-described born creative, Gordon specializes in identity design and branding. As
the son of a draftsman, he had dreams of being an architect but found his way into the
field of visual communication and graphic design. An avid and self-taught illustrator as
a youngster, Gordon still draws on lessons and skills learned and earned as a former graffiti artist.
Steve has been a featured speaker at the HOW Design Conference as well as a member
of the HOW Design Conference Advisory Committee. He is a frequent contributor on the
“Reflex Blue” podcast at 36point.com, and constantly looks to write and contribute to his
local design community, various design publications, blogs, and websites.
JOSHUA BERGER
WWW.JOSHUABERGER.COM
Joshua Berger is a founder and principal of Plazm, an award-winning design studio and
publisher of Plazm magazine. He is the winner of Gold Medals from the Portland Design
Festival and the Leipzig Book Fair (with John C Jay), and has been recognized by design
publications and award shows including the AIGA Annual Show, the Art Directors Club, as
well as 2004 and 2008 honorary exhibitions at ZGRAF in Zagreb, Croatia.
SARAH DOUGHER
Sarah Dougher is a composer, writer, musician and educator living in Portland, Oregon.
Sarah teaches at Portland State University in the Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
department and her academic interests focus around gender and popular music and
issues related to homeless youth and food security.

Introduction
Designers’ days are filled with wrangling in those isolated
ingredients of type, color, form, image, and copy into something
ordered, arresting, and compelling. It’s a strange brew
of art and commerce, what designers do. Many of the tools
of the trade—from PMS and CMYK, to grids, palettes, picas,
and pixels—are an expression of a designer’s requirement
to corral the creative into some kind of service.
This need to control the artistic impulse also expresses itself
in designers’ proclivity for maxims, precepts, and rules.
Use sans serif type for headlines. (Unless, of course, you’re
designing for the Web.) Make every client think they’re your
only client. (Except when you’re trying to show your industry
experience.) Stay focused on your career. (But taking time
off is pretty grand, too.) And herein lies the rub: for every
design decree, there is a counter commandment as well.
However, as we set out to collect the most cogent and
helpful of all of the above from a wide range of highly
opinionated designers—big names in large firms, to solo
practices and up-and-comers—we were struck by the overall
consistency of good advice and successful practices.
We were struck by another thing as well: the generosity of
designers in their willingness to share their hard-won
lessons. The best designers are united in their passion for
the beauty and necessity of what they do and follow habits
only because they contribute to the larger good of design,
designers, and the clients their work serves. So whether
you’re starting out or well established in your career, we
think you will find everything from helpful hints to deep
wisdom in the following pages. You may choose to break
the rules you find here, but as they say, it’s always best to
know them first.
–Laurel Saville


Table of Contents
INTRODUCTION 6
CONTRIBUTORS 8

Chapter One:
MANAGING THE BUSINESS 14
Chapter Two:
TO FREELANCE OR NOT TO FREELANCE 48
Chapter Three:
WORKING WITH CLIENTS 84
Chapter Four:
WORKING WITH EDITORS, ILLUSTRATORS,
VENDORS, AND INFORMATION 118
Chapter Five:
WORKING WITH OTHER CREATIVES 148
Chapter Six:
PROMOTING YOURSELF 184
Chapter Seven:
STAYING CREATIVE 214
Chapter Eight:
DESIGNING PUBLICATIONS 262
Chapter Nine:
THE ELEMENTS OF A PAGE 302
Chapter Ten:
DESIGNING BOOKS 340
Chapter Eleven:
DESIGNING NEW MEDIA 378
Chapter Twelve:
TECHNOLOGY AND DESIGN 444
Chapter Thirteen:
ACHIEVING BALANCE 462

ABOUT THE AUTHORS 494

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First published in the United States of America in 2011 by
Rockport Publishers, a member of
Quayside Publishing Group
100 Cummings Center
Suite 406-L
Beverly, Massachusetts 01915-6101
Telephone: (978) 282-9590
Fax: (978) 283-2742

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