-->
Navigation
Wiki Web Collaboration 2nd Edition

Wiki Web Collaboration 2nd Edition

Now pay Easier and Secure using Paypal
Price:

Read more

Anja Ebersbach ⋅ Markus Glaser, Richard Heigl ⋅ Alexander Warta

Foreword by Gunter Dueck


e-books shop
Wiki
Web Collaboration 2nd Edition


The Authors

Anja Ebersbach is an information scientist. She is a university and
technical college instructor, and is also active as a freelance IT
trainer. Her specialties are cooperative and collaborative work on the
Net, as well as collective learning. Furthermore, she is working on
her dissertation on the topic of “Wikis as Tools of Scientific Work”.
Markus Glaser, also an information scientist, primarily works as
a web and application programmer, where he specializes in MediaWiki
and TWiki systems. His dissertation focuses on the formation
of political opinions in cooperative media.
Dr. Richard Heigl, a historian, works as a freelance instructor, IT
trainer and moderator of large group seminars (Open Space, Future
Workshop). As the co-owner of the media workshop firm Hallo
Welt!-Medienwerkstatt GmbH, he is primarily occupied with the
planning and moderation of wiki projects.
Alexander Warta, information scientist, is a doctoral candidate
employed at Robert Bosch GmbH in Stuttgart. Warta has been
working scientifically and practically in the realm of knowledge
management in businesses for several years. He is a specialist for the
wiki software Confluence.


Foreword


A book about wikis!
That’s what people need.
Because with wiki technology, lots of people can freely work together
– they can even generate very large works in the intellectual
realm. See for yourself:

Today, we still marvel at our massive church buildings, each constructed
over a period of centuries, requiring an immense amount of
labor and often bearing the cultural stamp of all of the epochs during
which it was created. Someone just has to begin by placing stone
upon stone and motivating the people nearby to help out a bit. In
places where such enthusiastic fellow men and women lend a hand
and donate materials, great things can emerge. And where they are
absent? Either scant ruins remain, or the iron will of a pharaoh is
required, an army of drivers, the sweat of a people and a mountain of
gold. Great things can also be created in that way – take the Pyramids:
a clear concept, no blending of styles, pure will.

Those are two very different paths. The one entails passionate
people devotedly building something together for the common good;
the other: A single will manages a variety of resources to achieve a set goal.
Wikis are tools with which lots of people with a minimum of organization,
planning, money and time can create something together
and communicate with each other from several scattered computers
or over the Internet. Wikis are the technology for that first path of
volunteers with a common idea.

This book introduces wikis and provides you with enough tools to
create your own wiki; your own work platform. Yet the book will
also invite you to join the animated discussion on what one can do
with wikis and where it is better not to “abuse” them. It is the intriguing
question of those two stimuli: enthusiasm and will.

Allow me to explain by using an anecdote. Some time ago, I received
a letter from a reader regarding my books. Someone wrote
that he had inserted my name in the Internet lexicon ‘Wikipedia’. He
wrote that he initially only added a bit of preliminary data on me and
would continue to work on it. I was mighty proud that I was now to
be listed in an encyclopedia, and checked on the Internet right away
under “Gunter Dueck,” but I could’nt find anything. I found strange
messages indicating that there had been an article related to my
name but that it had been deleted. The reader I mentioned was angry,
and he tried posting his article again, but it again was deleted.
Days later, another “person” wrote something reasonable. That remained
on the Internet for a few days, but disappeared again, ostensibly
due to violation of copyright laws. Now wide awake, I then
attempted to find the email address of the person deleting everything.
I wrote: “Hey, why?” The answer: “The image most likely
violates copyright, and the text presumably as well. I am one of the
authorized persons assigned to quality and legal issues”. I argued:
“The picture of me was taken by my daughter Anne in our garden;
I give it to everyone. And the text is taken from the cover of one of
my books. I grant my permission to use that.” Three hours later,
“my” entry was back online again. Now I get nervous wondering if
the article has been defaced or deleted. Do you understand what
I mean? Anybody can do with me what he wants! If that is the case –
is everything true that is listed in Wikipedia? Can I treat the information
as being just as authentic as what I find in a book? Will anyone
award me damages if, through a false entry in Wikipedia, I lose a bet
or my reputation as a scientist? Questions abound regarding a variety
that grows on its own power! Of course, you could also see it
positively. “Wiki lives!” It changes, develops, grows – however, it
needs to be weeded, and its garden protected from thieves (lexical vandalism).

Wikipedia is one of the truly colossal wiki projects. Ten thousand
contributors are at work on a single intellectual monument. A number
of masters run around and find out when someone has cheated.
Controllers verify whether the building code is being followed.
Anyone can participate whenever and however he or she likes. No
time pressures, hardly any regulations, and no pay for the volunteer
work – only a profound sense of accomplishment. “One stone of that
pyramid is from me!” – That might be something a Wikipedia contributor might exclaim.

Wikis are exceptionally suitable for all such projects of several volunteers.
Would you like to connect the parents of students of the
Bammental grammar school? All of the members of a sports association?
All of the astronomers of the world? All Linux freaks in

your company? Do you want to create something in a community
with others? To maintain a community? Then you need a wiki! But which one?
The best one! As of today – I just checked – the German Wikipedia
homepage reads: “We have just converted the software to MediaWiki
1.4. Please report any problems here …” This book also
presents the wiki technology with the aid of the open source software
MediaWiki, which you can download from the Internet. So, if
you would like to use MediaWiki for your project, then you are in
good hands – several volunteers are working on follow-up versions
of “your” software – of that you can be sure! However, if you really
want more, or if you perhaps even want it all, so to speak, then
you’ll enjoy the detailed description of the high-end software TWiki.
This program can do much, much more – it can do it all, anything
currently technically possible – it offers a cornucopia of supplementary
functions, from presentation to drawing to calculating. And as
such, up in the technical heights, where anything is possible – you’ll
have a bit more difficulty in the installation process, I believe, and
will have to be more accomplished in its operation. What is the best
wiki? “The standard!” call some, “Extreme wiki!” shout others.
And, as usual, both sides are right.

So it’s got to be a wiki? Well, that’s no problem with this book!
However, the book will also seriously discuss what a wiki cannot
currently accomplish and what it should not even attempt. A wiki
should not be “abused” for the “second path” of accomplishing
things. The second path would be “finally” turning a community
endeavor of spontaneous enthusiasts into “a real project”. We need
a plan! We have to organize who is going to do what! We keep lists
on how much each person has accomplished! We check progress
and define goals! We do everything efficiently and do not waste
money! Does it always have to be the newest software? Can’t we
save more money?

Imagine if a company were building Wikipedia. Then there
would be the equivalent of the pharaoh’s will. A plan of necessary
words would be generated. The words would be prioritized according
to the importance presented by experts, and to the difficulty in
writing new entries. Managers would fervently search for new
sources where something could be copied or used more than once.
They would set the pay for entries and monitor the rapidity of the
work. The once volunteers would make sure they got everything
done quickly – without paying attention to details – just quickly,
according to plan and the respective remuneration.

That would be the path of the “project” and of efficiency.

A pyramid is built according to plan and schedule. It is made to be
completely uniform and flawless – nothing about it is spontaneous!
Nothing is voluntary. Everything bends to the central will: the project goal.

However, MediaWiki only invites volunteers to work on it! The
wiki technology does not assign jobs or assess performance. It does
not dole out punishment for insufficient output or errors. It does not
organize workflow. So, if you create a wiki for yourself, you should
know what a wiki will and will not be able to do. It can take a great
deal of spontaneity and create something beautiful, common, or
great. Yet it cannot truly be used as a tool to efficiently assert someone’s will.

The authors of this book offer a fresh introduction to the topic. They
are not afraid to take part in the discussion of the pros and cons of
wikis. They discuss the current dialogue using several charming
details. The book’s style is inviting – it is very factual, but somehow
charming nonetheless. While reading it, I imagined the authors as
the most passionately motivated of all wiki enthusiasts.

They write: a book about wikis!
And they are confident: That’s what people need.

Gunter Dueck

Introduction
Preface
Why a book about wikis? Some time ago, Anja came back all excited
from a conference on technology and social movements in
Munich. There, she had taken part in a workshop on working and
organizing with wikis. In the meantime, her excitement is also
shared by lots of others. The popularity and notoriety of this small
bit of software can primarily be attributed to the Internet encyclopedia
Wikipedia. Yet a number of organizations have also discovered
wikis as a simple and versatile tool for their work. For instance, the
hackers of Berlin’s Chaos Computer Club used it to organize their
conference. We were drawn to wikis chiefly due to the opportunity
to utilize wikis as organizational software for small groups. We
wanted to find out more.

Yet even the attempt to install a wiki was a puzzle. Information
and documentation on the Net were few and far between. There was
no manual. The only book on the subject, by Wiki creator Ward
Cunningham, was very informative, but not sufficient for our purposes.
We sensed that wikis could be used for much more than developing
texts in a cooperative manner. However, the wiki world is
a jungle rampant with political discussions and racing technological
development. What was missing was a survival kit, a practical introduction
that recommended paths through the jungle. You are now
holding an initial cartography of that jungle. Have a look around the
wilderness, and become familiar with its inhabitants. Design your
environment by setting up your own camp and blazing new trails.

Who Needs this Book?
While writing this book, we envisioned readers who already have
some computer experience and are considering whether to work
with a wiki or even install one of their own. Undoubtedly, veteran
wiki users will also consult this book, and we are sure that especially
the second part of it will be of interest to them.

The Content Concept
Among the multitude of wikis, we have selected three to present to
you: the widespread and relatively simple MediaWiki, TWiki, as
a piece of ambitioned wiki software, and the successful, commercial
Confluence:
􀂄 MediaWiki is fairly easy to install, and user-friendly in its operation.
Yet it also offers a series of features, such as a user administration,
and it can be employed as a simple but good communication
and organizational tool for groups of the most varied of
sizes. In short: It is the ideal introduction to wikis.
􀂄 TWiki is very challenging to install and, especially for technical
applications, assumes a good deal of skill and knowledge. Using
TWiki also takes some getting used to. Yet for complex projects, it
is worth the effort, because it offers a great deal of design options.
􀂄 Confluence is the famous system by the Australian company
Atlassian that provides this wiki along with an array of attractive
extensions at license costs to its customers. It is primarily utilized
on the intranet.

The caveman on the cover of the german edition inspired us in putting
together our practical examples. Among other projects, he and
his clan use a wiki to organize a conference in the Neolithic Age.
Admittedly, the combination of 21st-century technology and stoneaged
humans is not always consistent, but we hope it is demonstrative
and a bit amusing.

In the forefront of the wiki discussion are the social methods of
communication that crop up as a result. To this extent, the book also
attempts to be something more than a pure software manual. Some
will be irritated by the political fifth section. The wiki communities,
as the free software culture before them, have provoked extensive
socio-political discussions that are conducted at conventions such as
the Wizards of OS or the Chaos Communication Congress. So pour
yourself a glass of wine, get comfortable, and enter into a debate of
issues discussed there. Don’t be shy to spin it out further. We look
forward to your reactions, contributions and feedback, and wish to
offer a platform for these debates.

How to Use this Book
The book is conceived such that it can be read from front to back.
However, it is more realistic to expect readers to jump to “their”
chapters. That is why, next to the section headings, we have also
included an indication of how deep into the wiki software a respective
chapter delves. Authors need less previous technical knowledge
than wiki and web administrators.
􀂄 Beginners should start with sections One and Two. Wiki!? provides
a general introduction to wikis. It treats all questions that crop
up with one’s first confrontation with wikis. What are wikis?
How to they function technically? How do you explain the fascinating
phenomenon that open systems do not end in chaos?
􀂄 In Our First Wiki: MediaWiki, we present MediaWiki, the
most well-known wiki clone. Here, we will introduce you to practical
work with wikis and invite you to experiment. We’ll show
you how to install MediaWiki so you can get an idea of how it
functions. For instance, you will see how formats or tables are
generated, and lots more.
􀂄 Don’t be discouraged by TWiki, the Jack-of-all-Trades. Installing
TWiki requires a good deal of experience, and is more aimed
at future and current web administrators. Yet this section also
contains an introduction to using TWiki, which is also of general interest.
􀂄 In TWiki as a Project Module, we introduce TWiki as a tool for
the management of self-organized projects. Here, we’ll show you
further useful plugins and add-ons, such as the practical EditTable
plugin or a diagram tool. It is difficult to estimate the degree of
preliminary knowledge required on a general basis. The installation
of the plugin takes some getting used to. However, the function
of already installed plugins is easier. On the whole, we wish
to demonstrate that you can do a great deal more with wikis than
“just” write encyclopedias. They also basically support any other
type of project.
􀂄 Go with the Flow: Confluence provides an overview of the use
and administration of this commercial system. Here, you will see
what a wiki looks like that has been developed for use in the
realm of business.
􀂄 Tools with a Future intends to expand horizons. On the one
hand, it deals with current technical developments and important
wiki projects. On the other, we provide a short summary of the
social debates taking place within the wiki community.
􀂄 A Glossary and an Index will help you find your way through
the book.
􀂄 A CD-ROM is included in the book where you will find the
software discussed.
Our book is for male and female readers. However, for reasons of
brevity, the pronouns used will not always expressly address both –
but in our examples, both men and women work with wikis.
We Wish to Thank …
… first and foremost Christine Bühler, who, for years, has consistently
been on the scene during critical phases of seminars, master’s
theses, articles and book projects of the most varied kinds; Radovan
Kubani, our hopeful artist, who illustrated our book for us; Gunter
Dueck, not only for the foreword, but also for the corresponding
stimulating discussion; Andrea Adelung from team interculturale for
translating our book into excellent English. Our discussions in December
2004 with Jimmy Wales, the founder of Wikipedia, also
provided us with valuable ideas and motivation.

For countless critical notes and concrete suggestions for improvement,
we thank our volunteer editorial team: Andreas Schmal,
who also supplied us with calories and Bytes; Andreas Legner
helped out with corrections and constructive criticism, as did Thomas
“Schnaks” Schnakenberg, who weathered out the final phase
with us; Carsten Diederichs braved the installation instructions,
among other tasks. Richard Hölzl supported us from Göttingen with
long-distance diagnoses and the final chapter. Our thanks also to
Benjamin Heitmann for his comments, and Dirk Brömmel, who
stood by us with technical advice.
Regensburg, June 23, 2005 Anja Ebersbach
Markus Glaser
Richard Heigl


Table of Contents
I. Wiki!?
1 The Wiki Concept.............................................................. 11
1.1 What is a Wiki? ......................................................... 11
1.2 The Technology of Wikis ......................................... 16
1.3 Characteristic Wiki Functions................................... 19
1.4 Wiki Clones............................................................... 21
1.5 The Wiki Phenomenon.............................................. 22
1.5.1 Creativity Through Group Processes ........... 23
1.5.2 Limits of the Wiki Philosophy...................... 29
1.6 Wiki Pages................................................................. 33
1.7 Important Resources on the WWW.......................... 34
II. Our First Wiki: MediaWiki
2 The Installation................................................................. 37
2.1 A Test Environment with XAMPP........................... 38
2.1.1 XAMPP for Windows................................... 38
2.1.2 XAMPP for Linux ........................................ 40
2.1.3 What’s Going on here Anyway? .................. 40
2.2 Installing MediaWiki................................................. 42
2.2.1 Version 1: Local System............................... 43
2.2.2 Version 2: Installation on a Web Host ......... 43
2.2.3 Transferring a Local System
to the Webhost .............................................. 44
2.2.4 Completing the Installation
in the Browser ............................................... 45
3 First Steps........................................................................... 49
3.1 The Wiki at First Glance ........................................... 49
3.2 Hello World............................................................... 50
3.3 Initial Formatting....................................................... 52
3.4 Vive la Difference: Versions..................................... 54
3.5 Registering as a User ................................................. 55
4 The Core Functions of MediaWiki .................................. 57
4.1 Editing........................................................................ 57
4.2 Discussions ................................................................ 61
4.3 Comparisons .............................................................. 61
4.4 Moving and Renaming .............................................. 63
4.5 Watching.................................................................... 64
4.6 Protect ........................................................................ 66
4.7 Deleting...................................................................... 67
5 Formatting.......................................................................... 69
5.1 Formatting Characters ............................................... 69
5.2 Special Characters & Co. .......................................... 70
5.3 Headings and Paragraphs .......................................... 72
5.4 Lists and Lines........................................................... 73
5.5 Tables......................................................................... 75
5.6 Table of Contents....................................................... 80
6 Multi-Page Structures ....................................................... 81
6.1 Linking Methods........................................................ 81
6.2 Organizing Content.................................................... 85
6.3 Multi-Page Design I – Images................................... 90
6.4 Multi-Page Design II – Templates ............................ 98
6.5 Forwarding with Redirects ........................................ 105
7 Components: the Function Pages .................................... 107
7.1 Navigation.................................................................. 109
7.2 Search Function ......................................................... 113
7.3 User Administration .................................................. 114
7.4 Information about the Wiki ....................................... 119
7.5 Maintenance............................................................... 120
8 Administration ................................................................... 123
8.1 File Structure and LocalSettings.php ........................ 123
8.2 Database Structure..................................................... 129
8.3 Design: your own Skins ............................................ 131
8.4 Design of the Homepage with <div> Tags
and CSS...................................................................... 134
8.5 Spam .......................................................................... 136
8.6 Security ...................................................................... 138
8.7 Update and Uninstall ................................................. 139
9 Extensions........................................................................... 141
9.1 Integrating Existing Extensions ................................ 141
9.2 Employing Bots......................................................... 142
9.3 Excursion: Making your own Extension .................. 143
9.3.1 Programming in MediaWiki......................... 143
9.3.2 The Framework for Magic Words................ 145
9.3.3 Processing and Database............................... 147
9.4 The HalloWiki........................................................... 149
10 Life in MediaWiki ............................................................. 151
10.1 More than just Text ................................................... 151
10.2 Make Access Easier .................................................. 153
10.3 You’re not Writing Alone ......................................... 154
10.4 Usage Examples ........................................................ 156
10.4.1 Main Page with News................................... 156
10.4.2 Checklist........................................................ 157
10.4.3 Literature Database ....................................... 158
10.4.4 Calendar ........................................................ 159
III. TWiki, the Jack of all Trades
11 Installing TWiki................................................................. 165
11.1 Installation under Linux ............................................ 166
11.1.1 Copying TWiki ............................................. 167
11.1.2 Configuring Apache...................................... 167
11.1.3 Adapting Files ............................................... 168
11.1.4 Opening the Configuration File.................... 168
11.2 TWiki without an Admin-Account........................... 169
11.3 Installation under Windows ...................................... 170
11.3.1 Variant I: TWiki
for Windows Personal................................... 171
11.3.2 Variant II: TWiki VMWare
Virtual Machine ............................................ 171
11.3.3 Variant III: TWiki with IndigoPerl............... 172
11.3.4 Copying TWiki ............................................. 174
11.3.5 Configuring Apache...................................... 175
11.3.6 Retroactive Installation
of Perl Modules and Grep............................. 176
11.4 Completing TWiki Installation ................................. 176
11.5 Viewing TWiki Pages ............................................... 177
12 Working with TWiki........................................................ 179
12.1 What Are Webs? ....................................................... 179
12.2 A Website .................................................................. 180
12.2.1 The Menu Sidebar......................................... 181
12.2.2 The Information Bar...................................... 185
12.2.3 The Toolbar ................................................... 185
12.3 The Edit Window....................................................... 190
12.3.1 Storage........................................................... 190
13 Formatting in TWiki ......................................................... 193
13.1 Formatting Text ......................................................... 193
13.2 Tables......................................................................... 196
13.2.1 Wiki Convention ........................................... 196
13.2.2 Tables in HTML............................................ 197
13.2.3 Tables with the <verbatim> Tag................... 198
13.3 Links .......................................................................... 198
13.4 Integrating Images ..................................................... 199
13.5 HTML in TWiki ........................................................ 200
13.6 TWiki and JavaScript ................................................ 200
13.7 TWiki Variables ........................................................ 201
13.8 The WYSIWYG Editor: Kupu.................................. 204
14 Searching in TWiki............................................................ 209
14.1 The Search Function.................................................. 209
14.2 Effective Searching.................................................... 211
14.3 Searching with Regular Expressions......................... 212
14.4 Embedded Searches................................................... 214
15 Structured Data with Forms ............................................ 221
15.1 TWiki Forms.............................................................. 222
15.2 Generating a Form..................................................... 222
15.3 Topics with Forms..................................................... 225
15.4 Working with Structured Data .................................. 227
16 Installing TWiki ................................................................. 231
16.1 Authentication vs. Access Control............................ 231
16.2 Activating User Registration..................................... 232
16.3 Setting up Password Protection................................. 233
16.4 Access Control........................................................... 234
16.5 Strategies for User Rights.......................................... 238
17 Administering TWiki ........................................................ 239
17.1 Administering Webs.................................................. 239
17.1.1 Setup .............................................................. 239
17.1.2 Renaming, Deleting, Archiving.................... 241
17.1.3 RSS Feeds...................................................... 242
17.2 Topic Templates........................................................ 242
17.3 Interwiki Links .......................................................... 244
17.4 User Administration .................................................. 245
17.5 Email.......................................................................... 246
17.6 Security Aspects ........................................................ 247
17.7 Backing up Data ........................................................ 248
17.8 Upgrading and Uninstalling ...................................... 249
18 Designing a TWiki............................................................. 251
18.1 Designing the Look ................................................... 251
18.1.1 Functional Elements...................................... 253
18.1.2 Advanced Options......................................... 259
18.2 Plugins and Add-ons ................................................. 262
IV. TWiki as a Project Kit
19 Preliminary Thoughts: What is a Project? .................... 267
20 Conceptual Phase:
Collecting Ideas and Outlining the Project .................... 271
20.1 Establishing a Base.................................................... 271
20.2 Collecting Cooperative Ideas
and Generating Project Outlines ............................... 273
20.3 Keeping a Log with Wikis ........................................ 276
21 Composing the Project Plan............................................. 279
21.1 Preparing Work Packages ......................................... 279
21.2 The Project Schedule................................................. 282
21.3 Distributing Tasks and Forming Groups .................. 284
21.4 Outlining Structures and Procedures
with the TWikiDraw Plugin...................................... 286
21.5 The Tools................................................................... 288
21.6 To-do List with EditTable Plugin ............................. 291
21.6.1 Formatting the Entire Table.......................... 291
21.6.2 Parameters ..................................................... 292
21.6.3 Determining the Format
of Individual Cells......................................... 295
21.7 Planning Costs and Financing with Tables
(Spreadsheet Plugin) ................................................. 297
21.7.1 Syntax............................................................ 298
21.7.2 Important Functions...................................... 300
21.7.3 Exporting/Importing Excel Files .................. 303
22 Preparing for your Event.................................................. 305
22.1 Planning Your Event ................................................. 305
22.2 Conference Registration ............................................ 305
22.2.1 Modifying the Standard Registration............ 306
22.2.2 Designing the Registration Form.................. 306
22.2.3 Navigation ..................................................... 311
23 Executing and Documenting an Event............................ 313
23.1 In the Event Office .................................................... 313
23.2 Participant Administration/Registration Status......... 314
23.2.1 The InternalAdministration Page.................. 314
23.2.2 Generating Receipts ...................................... 317
23.2.3 Participant List .............................................. 319
23.3 Lectures with the Presentation Plugin
(SlideShow) ............................................................... 320
23.3.1 Syntax ............................................................ 320
23.3.2 Your Own Template...................................... 323
23.4 Generating Visuals for Statistics using Diagrams
(Chart Plugin) ............................................................ 327
23.4.1 Syntax ............................................................ 327
23.4.2 Sample Table................................................. 330
23.5 Final Steps: Feedback and Documentation............... 333
V. Go with the Flow: Confluence
24 Installing Confluence......................................................... 337
24.1 Atlassian Software Systems ...................................... 337
24.2 Licenses...................................................................... 338
24.3 Architecture ............................................................... 338
24.4 System Requirements ................................................ 339
24.5 Installation Options.................................................... 340
24.5.1 Standalone ..................................................... 340
24.5.2 EAR-WAR.................................................... 340
24.5.3 Cluster Installation ........................................ 341
24.5.4 Confluence Hosting....................................... 341
24.6 Standalone Installation .............................................. 342
24.6.1 Installation under Windows .......................... 342
24.6.2 Installation under Linux ................................ 346
25 Overview ............................................................................. 351
25.1 What are Spaces?....................................................... 351
25.2 Dashboard .................................................................. 351
25.3 Page Overview .......................................................... 353
25.3.1 Orientation and Search.................................. 353
25.3.2 User Area ...................................................... 354
25.3.3 Work Area..................................................... 356
25.3.4 Editing a Page ............................................... 360
26 Formatting.......................................................................... 363
26.1 The Difference between Wiki Markup
and Rich Text ............................................................ 363
26.1.1 Wiki Markup Editor...................................... 363
26.1.2 Rich Text Editor (WYSIWYG).................... 364
26.2 Headings .................................................................... 365
26.3 Text Format and Layout............................................ 366
26.4 Links .......................................................................... 367
26.5 Lists............................................................................ 370
26.6 Inserting Images ........................................................ 370
26.7 Inserting Tables ......................................................... 371
26.8 Miscellaneous............................................................ 373
26.9 HTML Input .............................................................. 374
27 Organization ...................................................................... 375
27.1 Browse Space – Navigation ...................................... 375
27.1.1 Pages.............................................................. 375
27.1.2 Labels ............................................................ 378
27.1.3 Attachments................................................... 379
27.1.4 Email ............................................................. 380
27.1.5 News.............................................................. 380
27.1.6 Activity.......................................................... 381
27.1.7 Advanced....................................................... 383
27.1.8 Space Admin................................................. 386
27.2 Full-text Search ......................................................... 386
27.3 Permissions Concept ................................................. 388
27.3.1 Global Permissions ....................................... 389
27.3.2 Space Permissions......................................... 390
27.3.3 Page Restrictions........................................... 392
27.4 Notifications .............................................................. 393
27.5 Drafts ......................................................................... 394
27.6 Tiny Links.................................................................. 395
28 Settings................................................................................ 397
28.1 Space Admin ............................................................. 397
28.1.1 Wastebasket Restore ..................................... 398
28.1.2 “Restricted Pages” Overview ....................... 398
28.1.3 Mail................................................................ 399
28.1.4 Look and Feel................................................ 399
28.2 Confluence Admin..................................................... 401
28.2.1 Configuration................................................. 402
28.2.2 Look and Feel................................................ 405
28.2.3 Administration............................................... 405
28.2.4 Security.......................................................... 407
28.2.5 Popular Plugins ............................................. 407
28.2.6 Forecast: Plugin Development...................... 411
28.2.7 Further Resources for Confluence ................ 411
VI. Tools with a Future
29 Technical Challenges......................................................... 417
29.1 Integration, Hybrids and Mashups ............................ 417
29.2 Editors ........................................................................ 418
29.3 In Search of Standards............................................... 420
30 A few Wiki Projects........................................................... 425
30.1 Projects of the Wikimedia Group.............................. 425
30.1.1 Free Database: Wikimedia Commons .......... 425
30.1.2 News from “the Bottom up:”
Wikinews....................................................... 426
30.1.3 A Wiki Search Engine?................................. 428
30.2 Other Wiki Worlds .................................................... 429
30.2.1 Overview....................................................... 429
30.2.2 Subcultures and Communities ...................... 430
30.2.3 Travel Guides and Local Wikis .................... 432
30.2.4 Wikis in Education and Science ................... 433
30.3 Wikis in Companies and Organizations.................... 434
31 The Art of “Sowing” Wikis............................................... 437
31.1 Collaborative Writing................................................ 437
31.2 Collaboration: Wikis as a Project Tool ..................... 438
31.2.1 Advantages and Problems of Wikis
in Projects ...................................................... 439
31.2.2 Flat Hierarchies: Relationship
between Moderator and Team...................... 441
31.2.3 A few more General Tips.............................. 444
32 Social Perspectives............................................................. 447
32.1 Clash of the Wikis ..................................................... 447
32.1.1 Wikis as an Engine for Social Change? ....... 447
32.1.2 Wikis and Ideology....................................... 449
32.1.3 Wiki, a Democratic Medium? ...................... 451
32.2 Ownership.................................................................. 453
32.3 Forms of Work .......................................................... 456
32.4 Objectivity ................................................................. 457
32.4.1 Progress? ....................................................... 461
Appendix
A Installations in TWiki ....................................................... 465
Perl ....................................................................................... 465
Shebang................................................................................ 466
Changing RCS Owners........................................................ 467
B Comparison Chart............................................................. 469
Glossary ...................................................................................... 471
Bibliography............................................................................... 477
Index............................................................................................ 481


Screenshot

e-books shop

Purchase Now !
Just with Paypal



Product details
 Price
 Pages
 480 p
 File Size
 20,625 KB
 File Type
 PDF format
 ISBN
 e-ISBN
 978-3-540-35150-4 
 978-3-540-68173-1
 Copyright
 2008, 2005
 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 
  ●▬▬▬▬▬❂❂❂▬▬▬▬▬●
●▬▬❂❂▬▬●
●▬❂▬●

═════ ═════