-->
Navigation
Securing Wireless LAN's, Wiley

Securing Wireless LAN's, Wiley

Now pay Easier and Secure using Paypal
Price:

Read more

E-books Shop
Securing Wireless LAN's

A Practical Guide for Network Managers, LAN Administratorsand the Home Office User


Introduction to Wireless LANs
Like any introductory chapter, our goal here is to become acquainted with basic concepts. Because this book is oriented towards wireless LAN securitywe need to obtain a firm understanding of the components used in a wireless LAN and their relationship to wired networking devices to appreciate wireless security issues.
Because many network managers and LAN administrators cannot afford the time required to read a book, we will begin this chapter with a section titled
Securing the Insecure. This section will note that wireless LAN security as defined by the IEEE 802.11 wireless LAN standard is weak and easily compromised. Methods that can be used to overcome existing security limitations will then be described. This preview of methods and techniques is presented as ‘food for thought’ and will be considerably expanded upon in the remainder of this book.
Once we obtain an appreciation of methods and techniques we should consider to secure any existing wireless LAN our organization may be operating, we will focus upon the basic architecture associated with IEEE 802.11 wireless LANs. In doing so we will note the general relationship of different types of wireless networking devices that are used to construct a wireless LAN. Once we obtain an appreciation of the types of devices associated with the construction of wireless LANs and obtain an overview of

the alphabet soup of wireless LAN standards, we will conclude this chapter with a preview of succeeding chapters in this book. This preview can be used as is or in conjunction with the table of contents and index to locate information of immediate concern. Now that we have a basic roadmap concerning the focus of the two sections in this chapter, let’s grab a Pepsi, Coke or another beverage and begin our journey into the wonderful world of wireless LANs..

Table of Contents

Preface xv
Acknowledgements xvii
      Chapter 1 Introduction to Wireless LANs
1.1 SECURING THE INSECURE 2
1.1.1 AAE AND A FUNCTIONS 2
1.1.2 AUTHENTICATION 2
1.1.3 AUTHORIZATION 3
1.1.4 ENCRYPTION 3
1.1.5 ACCOUNTING 4
1.1.6 PRACTICAL NETWORK PROTECTIONMETHODS 4
1.2 NETWORK ARCHITECTURE 7
1.2.1 BASIC NETWORKING DEVICES 7
1.2.2 THEWIRELESS LAN STATION 8
1.2.3 THE ACCESS POINT 10
1.2.4 THEWIRELESS BRIDGE 13
1.2.5 THEWIRELESS ROUTER 13
1.2.6 THE BASIC SERVICE SET 18
1.2.7 THE EXTENDED SERVICE SET (ESS) 20
1.2.8 STATION SERVICES 21
1.3 IEEEWIRELESS LAN STANDARDS 27
1.3.1 THE BASIC IEEE 802.11 STANDARD 28
1.3.2 802.11B 30
1.3.3 802.11A 30
1.3.4 802.11C 30
1.3.5 802.11D 31
1.3.6 802.11E 31
1.3.7 802.11F 31
1.3.8 802.11G 31
1.3.9 802.11H 31
1.3.10 802.11I 32
1.4 BOOK PREVIEW 32
1.4.1 FRAME FORMATS AND BASIC SECURITY OPERATIONS 32
1.4.2 UNDERSTANDINGWIRELESS SIGNALS 33
1.4.3 UNDERSTANDING WEP 33
1.4.4 SECURITY RISKS 33
1.4.5 PROPRIETARY SECURITY ENHANCEMENT TECHNIQUES 33
1.4.6 STANDARDS BASED SECURITY 34
      Chapter 2 Frame Formats and Basic Security Operation
2.1 FRAME FORMATS 35
2.1.1 BASIC FRAME FORMAT 36
2.1.2 FRAME CONTROL FIELD 36
2.1.3 CONTROL FRAMES 43
2.1.4 MANAGEMENT FRAMES 46
2.1.5 THE AUTHENTICATION PROCESS 53
2.2 WEP AND PRIVACY 53
2.2.1 MISCONCEPTIONS 53
2.2.2 DEVELOPMENT CONSTRAINTS 54
2.2.3 DEFICIENCIES 58
      Chapter 3 Understanding Wireless Signals
3.1 THEWIRELESS RF SPECTRUM AND BASICMEASUREMENTS 62
3.1.1 FREQUENCY 62
3.1.2 PERIOD ANDWAVELENGTH 63
3.1.3 BANDWIDTH 64
3.1.4 THE FREQUENCY SPECTRUM 64
3.1.5 POWERMEASUREMENTS 66
3.1.6 POWER LEVEL 69
3.1.7 SIGNAL-TO-NOISE RATIO 69
3.2 ANTENNA BASICS 71
3.2.1 BASIC OPERATION 72
3.2.2 CATEGORIES 73
3.2.3 ANTENNA GAIN 73
3.2.4 DIRECTIONALITY AND EIRP 74
3.2.5 POWER LEVELS 74
3.2.6 PROPAGATION LOSS 75
3.2.7 INCREASING ANTENNA GAIN 76
3.2.8 POWER LIMITS 77
3.2.9 RECEIVER SENSITIVITY 78
3.2.10 REDUCING EMITTED RADIATION 79
3.2.11 HORIZONTAL TRANSMISSION DISTANCE 80
3.2.12 EQUIPMENT POSITIONING 81
3.2.13 USINGMONITORING EQUIPMENT 83
      Chapter 4 Understanding WEP
4.1 THE WEP FRAME BODY 86
4.1.1 THE IV 86
4.1.2 THE ICV 87
4.1.3 THE NAKED DEFAULT 87
4.1.4 WEP KEY LIMITATIONS 90
4.2 LOCATING AND OBSERVINGWIRELESS LAN TRAFFIC 91
4.2.1 NETWORK STUMBLER 91
4.2.2 MONITORING WITH AIROPEEK 93
4.3 RC4 97
4.3.1 OVERVIEW 97
4.3.2 OPERATION 98
4.3.3 ILLUSTRATIVE EXAMPLE 99
4.3.4 STRENGTHS ANDWEAKNESSES 102
4.4 WEPWEAKNESS 102
4.4.1 UNSAFE AT ANY SIZE 102
4.4.2 THE INSECURITY OF 802.11 103
4.4.3 EXPLOITING RC4WEAKNESS 107
4.4.4 BREAKING WEP 108
4.4.5 AIRSNORT 109
4.4.6 WEPCRACK 110
      Chapter 5 Security Risks and Countermeasures
5.1 THE SSID 113
5.1.1 OVERVIEW 114
5.1.2 OVERRIDING THE SSID 114
5.1.3 OBTAINING THE SSID 115
5.1.4 COUNTERMEASURES 117
5.2 EAVESDROPPING 117
5.2.1 OVERVIEW 117
5.2.2 THREATS 118
5.2.3 COUNTERMEASURES 118
5.3 MASQUERADE 121
5.3.1 OVERVIEW 121
5.3.2 COUNTERMEASURES 122
5.4 DATAMODIFICATION 124
5.4.1 OVERVIEW 124
5.4.2 COUNTERMEASURES 124
5.5 FILE SHARING 124
5.5.1 OVERVIEW 124
5.5.2 WINDOWS 95 125
5.5.3 WINDOWS 2000 128
5.5.4 COUNTERMEASURES 131
5.6 JAMMING 131
5.6.1 OVERVIEW 131
5.6.2 COUNTERMEASURES 132
5.7 ENCRYPTION ATTACKS 133
5.7.1 OVERVIEW 134
5.7.2 COUNTERMEASURES 135
5.8 SNMP 135
5.8.1 CODING FLAWS 136
5.8.2 SNMP VERSIONS 136
5.8.3 COUNTERMEASURES 141
5.9 BROADCASTMONITORING 141
5.9.1 OVERVIEW 142
5.9.2 COUNTERMEASURES 144
5.10 ACCESSING AMANAGEMENT CONSOLE 145
5.10.1 OVERVIEW 145
5.10.2 COUNTERMEASURES 145
5.11 THEFT OF HARDWARE 146
5.11.1 OVERVIEW 146
5.11.2 COUNTERMEASURES 146
5.12 ROGUE ACCESS POINTS 147
5.12.1 OVERVIEW 147
5.12.2 COUNTERMEASURES 147
      Chapter 6 Proprietary Security Enhancement Techniques
6.1 MAC ADDRESS AUTHENTICATION 150
6.1.1 IEEE 802.11 AUTHENTICATION 150
6.1.2 IMPLEMENTATIONMETHODS 151
6.1.3 ACCESS POINT UTILIZATION 151
6.1.4 USING A RADIUS SERVER 151
6.1.5 DATAFLOW 151
6.1.6 LIMITATIONSWHEN USING AN AP 151
6.1.7 LIMITATIONS USING A RADIUS SERVER 152
6.1.8 CHAP 153
6.1.9 VISITOR CONSIDERATIONS 154
6.2 CLOSED SYSTEM OPTION 154
6.2.1 OVERVIEW 155
6.2.2 LIMITATIONS 155
6.3 SYSTEM ACCESS PASS PHRASE 155
6.3.1 OVERVIEW 155
6.3.2 NETWORK ACCESS 156
6.3.3 LIMITATIONS 156
6.4 DYNAMIC KEY EXCHANGE ANDWEAK KEY AVOIDANCE 156
6.4.1 DYNAMIC KEY EXCHANGE 157
6.4.2 OVERVIEW 157
6.4.3 LIMITATIONS 157
6.4.4 WEAK KEY AVOIDANCE 158
6.4.5 OVERVIEW 158
6.4.6 LIMITATIONS 158
6.5 PROTECTINGWIRELESS CLIENTS FROM THE PUBLIC NETWORK 158
6.5.1 OVERVIEW 159
6.5.2 CISCO ACCESS LISTS 159
6.5.3 SMC NETWORKS BARRICADE PACKET FILTERING 161
6.5.4 LIMITATIONS 163
6.5.5 SUMMARY 165
6.6 ANTENNA ORIENTATION AND SHIELDING 166
6.6.1 OVERVIEW 166
6.6.2 ALTERING SIGNAL STRENGTH 166
6.6.3 LIMITATIONS 167
6.7 MINIMIZING TRANSMIT POWER AND ANTENNA CONTROL 168
6.7.1 POWERMANAGEMENT 168
6.7.2 ANTENNA CONTROL 170
6.7.3 POWER LEVEL CONTROL 170
6.7.4 LIMITATIONS 171
6.8 WIRELESS INTRUSION DETECTION 172
6.8.1 OVERVIEW 172
6.8.2 LIMITATIONS 172
6.9 LEAP 173
6.9.1 OVERVIEW 173
6.9.2 OPERATION 174
6.9.3 CONFIGURATION 174
6.9.4 CONFIGURING THE ACCESS POINT 175
6.9.5 CLIENT CONFIGURATION 175
6.9.6 ENABLING WEP 177
6.9.7 LIMITATIONS 181
      Chapter 7 Standards Based Security
7.1 THE IEEE 802.1X STANDARD 183
7.1.1 OVERVIEW 183
7.1.2 GENERAL OPERATION 184
7.1.3 DATA FLOW 185
7.1.4 THE EAP PROTOCOL 187
7.1.5 MESSAGE TYPES 188
7.1.6 EAP PACKET FORMAT 188
7.1.7 THE DUAL-PORT AUTHENTICATIONMODEL 189
7.1.8 SECURITY LIMITATIONS 189
7.1.9 USING THE CISCO AIRONET 350 193
7.1.10 CLIENT SETUP 193
7.1.11 NETWORK SECURITY 198
7.1.12 USINGWINDOWS XP 200
7.1.13 ACCESS POINT SETUP 203
7.1.14 SECURITY SETUP 209
7.1.15 ACCESS 209
7.1.16 SECURITY SETUP OPTIONS 211
7.1.17 CLOSING THOUGHTS 219
7.2 EVOLVING ENCRYPTION 220
7.2.1 TKIP 221
7.2.2 AES 222
7.3 VPNS AND TUNNELING PROTOCOLS 224
7.3.1 VPN OVERVIEW 224
7.3.2 NEED FOR SECURITY 225
7.3.3 TYPES OF VPNS 226
7.3.4 APPLICABILITY TOWIRELESS LANS 228
7.3.5 VPN PROTOCOLS 229
7.3.6 PPTP 229
7.3.7 L2TP AND IPSEC 232
7.3.8 VPN OPERATIONS 234
Appendix A Wireless LAN Security Checklist 245
Index 249

 Screenshot 

E-books Shop

Purchase Now !
Just with Paypal



Product details
 Price
 File Size
 5,218 KB
 Pages
 275 p
 File Type
 PDF format
 ISBN
 0-470-85127-9
 Copyright
 2003 by John Wiley & Sons Ltd 
●▬▬▬▬▬❂❂❂▬▬▬▬▬●
●▬▬❂❂▬▬●
●▬❂▬●


═════ ═════