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Network Security Know It All, Morgan Kaufman Publishers

Network Security Know It All, Morgan Kaufman Publishers

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Network Security Know It All

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Publisher: Denise E. M. Penrose
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Morgan Kaufmann Publishers is an imprint of Elsevier.
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About The Author

Saurabh Bagchi (Chapter 10) is an assistant professor in the School of Electrical
and Computer Engineering at Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana. He is a faculty
fellow of the Cyber Center and has a courtesy appointment in the Department
of Computer Science at Purdue University. He received his M.S. and Ph.D. from
the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign in 1998 and 2001, respectively.
At Purdue, he leads the Dependable Computing Systems Lab (DCSL), where he and a
group of wildly enthusiastic students try to make and break distributed systems for
the good of the world. His work is supported by NSF, Indiana 21st Century Research
and Technology Fund, Avaya, and Purdue Research Foundation, with equipment
grants from Intel and Motorola. His papers have been runner-ups for best paper
in HPDC (2006), DSN (2005), and MTTS (2005). He has been an Organizing
Committee member and Program Committee member for the Dependable Systems
and Networks Conference (DSN) and the Symposium on Reliable Distributed
Systems (SRDS). He also contributed to Information Assurance: Dependability
and Security in Networked Systems, published by Elsevier, 2007.

Bruce S. Davie (Chapter 1) joined Cisco Systems in 1995, where he is a Cisco
Fellow. For many years, he led the team of architects responsible for Multiprotocol
Label Switching and IP Quality of Service. He recently joined the Video and
Content Networking Business Unit in the Service Provider group. He has 20 years
of networking and communications industry experience and has written numerous
books, RFCs, journal articles, and conference papers on IP networking.
He is also an active participant in both the Internet Engineering Task Force and the
Internet Research Task Force. Prior to joining Cisco, he was director of internetworking
research and chief scientist at Bell Communications Research. Bruce
holds a Ph.D. in computer science from Edinburgh University and is a visiting
lecturer at M.I.T. His research interests include routing, measurement, quality
of service, transport protocols, and overlay networks. He is also a co-author of
Computer Networks: A Systems Approach, published by Elsevier, 2007.

Adrian Farrel (Chapter 5) has over two decades of experience designing and
developing communications protocol software. As Old Dog Consulting, he is an
industry-leading freelance consultant on MPLS, GMPLS, and Internet routing, formerly
working as MPLS Architect for Data Connection Ltd., and as director of
Protocol Development for Movaz Networks, Inc. He is active within the Internet
Engineering Task Force, where he is co-chair of the CCAMP working group
responsible for GMPLS, the Path Computation Element (PCE) working group, and
the Layer One VPN (L1VPN) working group. Adrian has co-authored and contributed
to numerous Internet drafts and RFCs on MPLS, GMPLS, and related technologies.
He is also the author of The Internet and Its Protocols: A Comparative
Approach, published by Elsevier, 2004.

Bingrui Foo (Chapter 10) is a Ph.D. student in the School of Electrical and
Computer Engineering at Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana. Presently,
he is involved in two research projects: one in the fi eld of network security, specifi
cally the design of intrusion-tolerant systems and automated response mechanisms,
and one in the fi eld of statistical modeling, which consists of extending
mixture models by adding hierarchal structure to images and videos. His papers
have appeared in DSN and ACSAC. He also contributed to Information Assurance:
Dependability and Security in Networked Systems, published by Elsevier, 2007.

Vijay K. Garg (Chapter 7) has been a professor in the Electrical and Computer
Engineering Department at the University of Illinois at Chicago since 1999,
where he teaches graduate courses in Wireless Communications and Networking.
Dr. Garg was a Distinguished Member of Technical Staff at the Lucent Technologies
Bell Labs in Naperville, Illinois, from 1985 to 2001. He received his Ph.D. from
the Illinois Institute of Technologies, Chicago, Illinois, in 1973, and he received an
M.S. from the University of California at Berkeley, California, in 1966. Dr. Garg has
co-authored several technical books, including fi ve in wireless communications. He
is a fellow of ASCE and ASME, and a senior member of IEEE. Dr. Garg is a registered
professional engineer in the states of Maine and Illinois. He is an academic member
of the Russian Academy of Transport. Dr. Garg was a feature editor of Wireless/PCS
Series in IEEE Communication Magazine from 1996 to 2001. He is also the author
of Wireless Communications & Networking, published by Elsevier, 2007.

Matthew W. Glause (Chapter 10) Center for Education and Research in
Information Assurance and Security (CERIAS), Dependable Computing Systems
Laboratory, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University.
He also contributed to Information Assurance: Dependability and Security in
Networked Systems, published by Elsevier, 2007.

Gaspar Modelo-Howard (Chapter 10) is a Ph.D. student in the Department of
Electrical and Computer Engineering and a member of the Center for Education
and Research in Information Assurance and Security (CERIAS) at Purdue University,
West Lafayette, Indiana. He came to Purdue after spending seven years as an information
security offi cer for the Panama Canal Authority and fi ve years as a college
professor for network security courses. His current research interests include
machine-learning techniques for intrusion response and the convergence
between security and dependability. He has an M.S. in information security from
Royal Holloway, University of London, and a B.S. in electrical engineering from
Universidad Tecnologica de Panama. He also contributed to Information Assurance:
Dependability and Security in Networked Systems, published by Elsevier, 2007.

James Joshi (Chapter 2) is an assistant professor in the School of Information
Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He is a cofounder and
the director of the Laboratory of Education and Research on Security Assured
Information Systems (LERSAIS). At Pitt, he teaches several information assurance
(IA) courses and coordinates the IA program. His research interests include access
control models, security and privacy of distributed multimedia systems, trust management,
and information survivability. His research has been supported by the
National Science Foundation, and he is a recipient of the NSF-CAREER award in
2006. He received his M.S. in computer science and a Ph.D. in electrical and computer
engineering from Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, in 1998 and
2003, respectively. He is also a co-author of Information Assurance: Dependability
and Security in Networked Systems, published by Elsevier, 2007.

Prashant Krishnamurthy (Chapter 2) is an associate professor with the
graduate program in Telecommunications and Networking at the University of
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. At Pitt, he regularly teaches courses on wireless communication
systems and networks, cryptography, and network security. His research
interests are wireless network security, wireless data networks, position location
in indoor wireless networks, and radio channel modeling for indoor wireless
networks. His research has been funded by the National Science Foundation
and the National Institute of Standards and Technology. He is the co-author of the
books Principles of Wireless Networks: A Unifi ed Approach and Physical Layer
of Communication Systems (Prentice Hall; 1st edition, December 11, 2001). He
served as the chair of the IEEE Communications Society, Pittsburgh Chapter, from
2000 to 2005. He obtained his Ph.D. in 1999 from Worcester Polytechnic Institute,
Worcester, Massachusetts. He is also a co-author of Information Assurance:
Dependability and Security in Networked Systems, published by Elsevier, 2007.

Pete Loshin (Chapter 6) writes and consults about Internet protocols and
open source network technologies. Formerly on the staff of BYTE Magazine,
Information Security Magazine, and other publications, his work appears regularly
in leading trade publications and websites, including CPU,Computerworld,PC
Magazine, EarthWeb, Internet.com, and CNN. He is also the author of IPv6: Theory,
Protocol, and Practice, published by Elsevier, 2003.

James D. McCabe (Chapter 3) was an advisor on networking to NASA and the
Department of Commerce OCIOs. He is the recipient of multiple NASA awards
and holds patents in supercomputer network research. He has been architecting,
designing, and deploying high-performance networks for over 20 years. He
also consults, teaches, and writes about network analysis, architecture, and design.
McCabe holds degrees in chemical engineering and physics from Georgia Institute
of Technology and Georgia State University. He is also the author of Network
Analysis, Architecture, and Design, published by Elsevier, 2007.

Lionel M. Ni (Chapter 8) is a professor and head of the Computer Science
Department at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. Dr. Ni
earned his Ph.D. in electrical and computer engineering from Purdue University,
West Lafayette, Indiana, in 1981. He was a professor in the Computer Science
and Engineering Department at Michigan State University, where he started his
academic career in 1981. He has been involved in many projects related to wireless
technologies, 2.5G/3G cellular phones, and embedded systems. He is also a
co-author of Smart Phone and Next Generation Mobile Computing, published
by Elsevier, 2005.

Larry L. Peterson (Chapter 1) is a professor and chair of Computer Science
at Princeton University. He is the director of the Princeton-hosted PlanetLab
Consortium and chair of the planning group for NSF’s GENI Initiative. His research
focuses on the design and implementation of networked systems. Peterson is a fellow
of the ACM. He received his Ph.D. from Purdue University in 1985. He is also a
co-author of Computer Networks: A Systems Approach, published by Elsevier, 2007.

Rajiv Ramaswami (Chapter 9) leads a group in planning and designing photonic
switching products at Nortel Networks. He has worked on optical networks
since 1988, from early research to product development, that includes stints at
IBM research, Tellabs, and Xros (now part of Nortel). He is an IEEE Fellow and a
recipient of the IEEE W.R.G. Baker and W.R. Bennett prize paper awards, as well
as an Outstanding Innovation award from IBM. Rajiv received a Ph.D. in electrical
engineering and computer science from the University of California at Berkeley.
He is also a co-author of Optical Networks: A Practical Perspective, published by
Elsevier, 2001.

Kumar N. Sivarajan (Chapter 9) is cofounder and chief technology offi cer at
Tejas Networks, an optical networking start-up in Bangalore, India. He has worked
on optical, wireless, ATM, and Internet networking technologies for over a decade,
fi rst at IBM Research and then at the Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore. He
is a recipient of the IEEE W.R.G. Baker and W.R. Bennett prize paper awards.
Kumar received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the California Institute of
Technology. He is also a co-author of Optical Networks: A Practical Perspective,
published by Elsevier, 2001.

Eugene H. Spafford (Chapter 10) is one of the most senior and recognized leaders
in the fi eld of computing. He has an ongoing record of accomplishments as
a senior advisor and consultant on issues of security, education, cyber crime, and
computing policy to a number of major companies, law enforcement organizations,
and academic and government agencies, including Microsoft, Intel, Unisys,
the U.S. Air Force, the National Security Agency, the GAO, the Federal Bureau of
Investigation, the National Science Foundation, the Department of Energy, and for
two presidents of the United States. With nearly three decades of experience as
a researcher and instructor, Dr. Spafford has worked in software engineering, reliable
distributed computing, host and network security, digital forensics, computing
 policy, and computing curriculum design. He is responsible for a number of “fi rsts ”
in several of these areas. Dr. Spafford is a professor with a joint appointment in computer
science and electrical and computer engineering at Purdue University, West
Lafayette, Indiana, where he has served on the faculty since 1987. He is also a professor
of philosophy (courtesy) and a professor of communication (courtesy). He is
the executive director of the Purdue University Center for Education and Research
in Information Assurance and Security (CERIAS). As of 2007, Dr. Spafford is also an
adjunct professor of computer science at the University of Texas at San Antonio,
and is executive director of the Advisory Board of the new Institute for Information
Assurance there. Dr. Spafford serves on a number of advisory and editorial boards,
and he has been honored several times for his writing, research, and teaching on
issues of security and ethics. He also contributed to Information Assurance:
Dependability and Security in Networked Systems, published by Elsevier, 2007.

George Varghese (Chapter 4) is a widely recognized authority on the art of
network protocol implementation. Currently a professor in the Department
of Computer Science at UC–San Diego, he has previously worked for Digital
Equipment Corporation and taught at Washington University. Elected a fellow
of the ACM in 2002, he holds (with colleagues) 14 patents in the general fi eld
of network algorithmics. Several algorithms that he helped develop have found
their way into commercial systems, including Linux (timing wheels), the Cisco
GSR (DRR), and MS Windows (IP lookups). He is also the author of Network
Algorithmics: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Designing Fast Networked
Devices, published by Elsevier, 2004.

Yu-Sung Wu (Chapter 10) is a Ph.D. student in the School of Electrical and
Computer Engineering at Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, since 2004. His
primary research areas are information security and fault tolerance in computer systems.
He is a member of the Dependable Computing Systems Laboratory at Purdue,
where he participates in the research projects for ADEPTS (an intrusion response
system) and CIDS (a correlation framework for intrusion detection). Yu-Sung also
has been working closely with researchers at Avaya Labs on building the IDS/IPS
solutions for voiceover IP systems. He also contributed to Information Assurance:
Dependability and Security in Networked Systems, published by Elsevier, 2007.

Pei Zheng (Chapter 8) was an assistant professor in the Computer Science
Department at Arcadia University and a consultant working in the areas of mobile
computing and distributed systems during the writing of this book. Dr. Zheng
received his Ph.D. in computer science from Michigan State University in 2003. He
was a member of the technical staff in Bell Laboratories/Lucent Technologies. He
joined Microsoft in 2005. His research interests include distributed systems, network
simulation and emulation, and mobile computing. He is also a co-author of Smart
Phone and Next Generation Mobile Computing, published by Elsevier, 2005.
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Table of Contents
About the Authors
1.1 Cryptographic Tools
1.2 Key Predistribution
1.3 Authentication Protocols
1.4 Secure Systems 
1.5 Firewalls 
1.6 Conclusion 
Further Reading
CHAPTER 2 Network Attacks
2.1 Introduction
2.2 Network Attacks and Security Issues
2.3 Protection and Prevention 
2.4 Detection 
2.5 Assessment and Response
2.6 Conclusion 
References
CHAPTER 3 Security and Privacy Architecture
3.1 Objectives 
3.2 Background 
3.3 Developing a Security and Privacy Plan 
3.4 Security and Privacy Administration 
3.5 Security and Privacy Mechanisms
3.6 Architectural Considerations 
3.7 Conclusion
CHAPTER 4 Network Security Algorithms
4.1 Searching for Multiple Strings in Packet Payloads 
4.2 Approximate String Matching
4.3 IP Traceback via Probabilistic Marking
4.4 IP Traceback via Logging
4.5 Detecting Worms
4.6 Conclusion
CHAPTER 5 Concepts in IP Security
5.1 The Need for Security 
5.2 Choosing Where to Apply Security
5.3 Components of Security Models 
5.4 IPsec
5.5 Transport-Layer Security
5.6 Securing the Hypertext Transfer Protocol 
5.7 Hashing and Encryption: Algorithms and Keys
5.8 Exchanging Keys 
Further Reading 
CHAPTER 6 IP Security in Practice
6.1 IP Security Issues
6.2 Security Goals
6.3 Encryption and Authentication Algorithms
6.4 IPsec: The Protocols
6.5 IP and IPsec 
6.6 Implementing and Deploying IPsec 
6.7 Conclusion 
CHAPTER 7 Security in Wireless Systems
7.1 Introduction 
7.2 Security and Privacy Needs of a Wireless System 
7.3 Required Features for a Secured Wireless Communications System 
7.4 Methods of Providing Privacy and Security in Wireless Systems
7.5 Wireless Security and Standards
7.6 IEEE 802.11 Security 
7.7 Security in North American Cellular/PCS Systems
7.8 Security in GSM, GPRS, and UMTS
7.9 Data Security
7.10 Air Interface Support for Authentication Methods 
7.11 Summary of Security in Current Wireless Systems
7.12 Conclusion
References
CHAPTER 8 Mobile Security and Privacy
8.1 Security Primer
8.2 Cellular Network Security 
8.3 Wireless LAN Security
8.4 Bluetooth Security
8.5 Ad Hoc Network Security
8.6 Mobile Privacy 
8.7 Conclusion 
Further Reading
References 
CHAPTER 9 Optical Network Survivability
9.1 Basic Concepts
9.2 Protection in SONET/SDH
9.3 Protection in IP Networks
9.4 Why Optical Layer Protection 
9.5 Optical Layer Protection Schemes 
9.6 Interworking between Layers
9.7 Conclusion
Further Reading
References
CHAPTER 10 Intrusion Response Systems: A Survey
10.1 Introduction
10.2 Static Decision-Making Systems
10.3 Dynamic Decision-Making Systems
10.4 Intrusion Tolerance through Diverse Replicas
10.5 Responses to Specifi c Kinds of Attacks
10.6 Benchmarking Intrusion Response Systems
10.7 Thoughts on Evolution of IRS Technology
10.8 Conclusion
References
Index 


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Product details
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 File Size
 3,322 KB
 Pages
 365 p
 File Type
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 ISBN
 978-0-12-374463-0
 Copyright
 2008 by Elsevier Inc    
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